“senior male unintended weight loss -sudden senior weight loss”

Commonly referred to as GERD or acid reflux, is a condition in which the liquid content of the stomach regurgitates (backs up or refluxes) into the esophagus. The liquid can inflame and damage the lining (cause esophagitis) of the esophagus although visible signs of inflammation occur in a minority of patients.
26. Yeh SS, Wu SY, Lee TP, et al. Improvement in quality-of-life measures and stimulation of weight gain after treatment with megestrol acetate oral suspension in geriatric cachexia: results of a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. J Am Geriatr Soc 2000;48:485–92 [PubMed]
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Obesity is a complex disorder involving an excessive amount of body fat. Obesity isn’t just a cosmetic concern. It increases your risk of diseases and health problems, such as heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure.
Taking a walk everyday is good for the body and the mind. Walking outside is a quiet time for the mind to relax and unwind, while giving your body low impact exercise. Walking just a mile every day keeps your muscles and joints engaged so that they maintain and improve their strength.
In 1850, the average man had a normal body mass index (BMI) of 23. Fast forward to 2000, and the male frame elongated and ballooned to a BMI of 28.2, teetering on the brink of obesity [source: Kolata]. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), adults aged 40 to 59 — aka baby boomers — have the highest prevalence of obesity. Of that group, 40 percent of men and 41 percent of women were obese in 2007 [source: CDC]. Their parents, however, had a lower overall obesity rate.
According to a recent study, Americans get 11 percent of their calories, on average, from fast food—a number that’s almost certainly much higher among the less affluent overweight. As a result, the fast-food industry may be uniquely positioned to improve our diets. Research suggests that calorie counts in a meal can be trimmed by as much as 30 percent without eaters noticing—by, for example, reducing portion sizes and swapping in ingredients that contain more fiber and water. Over time, that could be much more than enough to literally tip the scales for many obese people. “The difference between losing weight and not losing weight,” says Robert Kushner, the obesity scientist and clinical director at Northwestern, “is a few hundred calories a day.”
Health problems associated with obesity are classified as either nonfatal or life threatening by the World Health Organization (2005). This section will discuss the consequences of obesity on both nonfatal and life-threatening health problems. Interventions to address these particular consequences will be discussed as each consequence is presented. Specific interventions to decrease obesity will be discussed in the following section titled, “Interventions to Address Obesity.”
These include lower intensity and mildly stressful exercises like water walking, swimming, walking on treadmill and lifting lesser amount of free weights. These cardiovascular workouts can keep the seniors fit and healthy. Slow aerobics and stretching exercises can also be incorporated in senior weight loss programs.
It is also easy to understand why many senior men and women are debilitated by obesity—nonexercising adults lose over 5 pounds (2.3 kg) of muscle and add about 15 pounds (6.8 kg) of fat each decade, bringing about an increase in body fat that may be 50 percent greater than the increase in bodyweight (Evans and Rosenberg 1992). Thus, older clients may come to you with simply too much fat and too little muscle, which makes every one of their physical tasks more strenuous, almost as if they are driving a semitrailer truck with a motor scooter engine. Fortunately, sensible strength training can remediate this situation (Campbell et al. 1994; Westcott 2009).
45. Larrieu S, Pérès K, Letenneur L, Berr C, Dartigues JF, Ritchie K, Février B, Alpérovitch A, Barberger-Gateau P: Relationship between body mass index and different domains of disability in older persons: the 3C study. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 2004; 28: 1555– 1560 [PubMed]
Boomers have a lot to gain by losing a little. Many already have obesity-related health conditions, such as diabetes or high blood pressure. Recent research indicates that an average reduction of 3.74 pounds (1.7 kilograms) per person would result in 178,000 fewer cases of coronary heart disease and 890,000 fewer diabetics [source: Goodwin].
While losing weight is a simple concept in theory — expend more calories than you take in — it is a more complex process in reality. But for seniors, the “battle of the bulge” can be even harder to the natural slowing down of the metabolism. In other words, a 65-year-old might eat the same meal he ate at age 20 and yet burn calories at a slower rate. This can be confusing and frustrating for seniors as they watch the pounds creep up on the scale.
Adding to the problem is the fact that baby boomers weren’t raised with deprivation. To the contrary, an abundance of food – frozen food, canned food, soft drinks and snack food – filled many boomers’ childhood kitchens. The generation embraced fast food culture in their teens and 20s. The question for many of them now, in their 50s and 60s, is why they’re still eating like kids.
Liver cancer: People who are overweight or obese are up to twice as likely as normal-weight people to develop liver cancer. The association between overweight/obesity and liver cancer is stronger in men than women (11, 12).
The good news is that losing a small amount of weight can reduce your chances of developing heart disease or a stroke. Reducing your weight by 10% can decrease your chance of developing heart disease.
Primarily obesity is a result of an imbalance between our energy intake and our energy output. We generally take in too many calories, and burn too few. For some people, this is the simple and only answer to their dilemma.  All they need to do is adjust how much they are taking in, to the amount of activity they perform during the day. For most people though, in addition to just calorie counting, losing or maintaining a good weight involves other factors including genetics, physiology, culture, and psychological disposition.
A number of organizations exist that promote the acceptance of obesity. They have increased in prominence in the latter half of the 20th century.[222] The US-based National Association to Advance Fat Acceptance (NAAFA) was formed in 1969 and describes itself as a civil rights organization dedicated to ending size discrimination.[223]
Lack of physical activity due to high amounts of TV, computer, videogame or other screen usage has been associated with a high body mass index . Healthy lifestyle changes, such as being physically active and reducing screen time, can help you aim for a healthy weight.
Hu, F., Li, T., Colditz, G., Willett, W., & Manson, J. (2003). Television watching and other Sedentary behaviors, in relation to risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus in women. JAMA, 289, 1785-1791.
Ethnicity. Ethnicity factors may influence the age of onset and the rapidity of weight gain. African-American women and Hispanic women tend to experience weight gain earlier in life than Caucasians and Asians, and age-adjusted obesity rates are higher in these groups. Non-Hispanic black men and Hispanic men have a obesity rate then non-Hispanic white men, but the difference in prevalence is significantly less than in women.
If you’re struggling to be interested in food or you’ve lost the motivation to eat, try to eat with friends or family as often as possible. Lunch clubs are also a great way to make mealtimes more social.
Overweight and obesity and their associated health problems have a significant economic impact on health systems and the medical costs associated with overweight and obesity have both direct and indirect costs – direct medical costs may include preventive, diagnostic, and treatment services related to obesity, while indirect costs relate to loss of income from decreased productivity, restricted activity, absenteeism, and bed days and the income lost by premature death.
Choose a report:2018 Health of Women and Children Report2017 Annual Report2017 Health of Women Who Have Served2017 Senior Report2016 Annual Report2016 Health of Those Who Have Served Report2016 Health of Women and Children Report2016 Senior Report2015 Annual Report
Obesity is a chronic condition. Too often it is viewed as a temporary problem that can be treated for a few months with a strenuous diet. However, as most overweight people know, weight control must be considered a lifelong effort. To be safe and effective, any weight-loss program must address the long-term approach or else the program is largely a waste of time, money, and energy.

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