“reasons for weight loss in older dogs +childhood obesity articles new york times”

Asthma and obstructive sleep apnea are two common respiratory diseases that have been linked with obesity. In a meta-analysis of seven prospective studies that included 333,000 subjects, obesity increased the risk of developing asthma in both men and women by 50 percent. (33) Obesity is also a major contributor to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which is estimated to affect approximately one in five adults; one in 15 adults has moderate or severe obstructive sleep apnea. This condition is associated with daytime sleepiness, accidents, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and premature mortality. Between 50 percent and 75 percent of individuals with OSA are obese. (32) Clinical trials suggest that modest weight loss can be helpful when treating sleep apnea. (34, 35)
We need to learn more about the causes of obesity, and then we need to change the ways we treat it. When obesity is accepted as a chronic disease, it will be treated like other chronic diseases such as diabetes and high blood pressure. The treatment of obesity cannot be a short-term “fix” but has to be an ongoing lifelong process.
A follow-up study was recently released in the American Journal of Public Health, in which Masters and his colleagues found that obesity accounts for 18 percent of deaths in people ages 40 to 85. This estimate is more than four times higher than researchers previously thought. Due to environmental factors—more sedentary lifestyle, processed foods—the study says each generation is obese for a longer period than the former, a factor not considered in previous estimates.
In people with heart failure, those with a BMI between 30.0 and 34.9 had lower mortality than those with a normal weight. This has been attributed to the fact that people often lose weight as they become progressively more ill.[76] Similar findings have been made in other types of heart disease. People with class I obesity and heart disease do not have greater rates of further heart problems than people of normal weight who also have heart disease. In people with greater degrees of obesity, however, the risk of further cardiovascular events is increased.[77][78] Even after cardiac bypass surgery, no increase in mortality is seen in the overweight and obese.[79] One study found that the improved survival could be explained by the more aggressive treatment obese people receive after a cardiac event.[80] Another found that if one takes into account chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in those with PAD, the benefit of obesity no longer exists.[75]
I’m not picking out rare, less healthy examples from these establishments. Check out their menus online: fat, sugar, and other refined carbs abound. (Café Gratitude says it uses only “healthy” fats and natural sweeteners; Akasha says its focus is not on “health food” but on “farm to fork” fare.) In fact, because the products and dishes offered by these types of establishments tend to emphasize the healthy-sounding foods they contain, I find it much harder to navigate through them to foods that go easy on the oil, butter, refined grains, rice, potatoes, and sugar than I do at far less wholesome restaurants. (These dishes also tend to contain plenty of sea salt, which Pollanites hold up as the wholesome alternative to the addictive salt engineered by the food industry, though your body can’t tell the difference.)
Having a deficiency can lead to osteoporosis, muscle weakness and arthritis. Taking a Vitamin D supplement can reduce the chances of this, and combined with exercise will help you build back your muscles to a point were you can be self-sufficient again.
Still, plenty of older adults can benefit from losing weight, particularly if they’re obese, have weight-related chronic conditions or a poor quality of life. “If a person is overweight, they [often] feel better if they’ve lost weight,” says Dr. James Powers, a geriatrician and professor in the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. “There’s less wear on the joints, greater endurance, greater ability to walk; to do normal activities without getting short of breath.”
Identify temptations. Learn what environments or social activities, such as watching TV or going out with friends, may be keeping you from meeting your goals. Once you have identified them, use creative strategies to help keep you on track.  
A constellation of conditions that place people at high risk for coronary artery disease. These conditions include type 2 diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure, and a poor lipid profile with elevated LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, low HDL (“good”) cholesterol, elevated triglycerides. All of these conditions are associated with high blood insulin levels. The fundamental defect in the metabolic syndrome is insulin resistance in both adipose tissue and muscle.
There is some debate, however, about whether it’s good for elderly people to lose weight, even if they are obese. Some studies have found an association between weight loss in seniors and mortality risk, but Villareal says many of those studies did not distinguish between voluntary weight loss and involuntary weight loss that may be related to illness.
Jump up ^ Carmienke, S; Freitag, M H; Pischon, T; Schlattmann, P; Fankhaenel, T; Goebel, H; Gensichen, J (20 March 2013). “General and abdominal obesity parameters and their combination in relation to mortality: a systematic review and meta-regression analysis”. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 67 (6): 573–85. doi:10.1038/ejcn.2013.61.
The incidence of hypertension, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome intensifies with age, and aging per se is closely linked to increased prevalence of most of the abnormalities contributing to the metabolic syndrome (3). The incidence of the metabolic syndrome rises with increasing BMI, and a broader waist circumference is more common in men older than 65 years than in younger age-groups (3). The occurrence of the metabolic syndrome reaches peak levels in the 6th decade for men and the 7th decade for women, and a decline is noted only in the 8th decade for men and for some women in different ethnic groups (3). As recently outlined by the American Heart Association Professional Education Committee of the Council for High Blood Pressure Research, older age and obesity are two of the most powerful risk factors for uncontrolled hypertension (4), and high blood pressure, in turn, is a major determinant of mortality and stroke incidence, particularly in senior years. BMI and abdominal obesity are significantly and independently associated with an increase in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and hypertension, and obesity contributes to the development of hypertension in diabetes in all ages, including old age (5). Hence, separation of abdominal adiposity from its closest sequels, i.e., the metabolic syndrome, hypertension, and diabetes, is somewhat artificial, especially later in life. Adiposity strongly influences these risk factors, which, with the passage of time, may directly dominate the occurrence of complications. The strongest support for such a sequence of events is the fact that attempted weight loss is associated with lower all-cause mortality, regardless of age (6).
The Pollanites seem confused about exactly what benefits their way of eating provides. All the railing about the fat, sugar, and salt engineered into industrial junk food might lead one to infer that wholesome food, having not been engineered, contains substantially less of them. But clearly you can take in obscene quantities of fat and problem carbs while eating wholesomely, and to judge by what’s sold at wholesome stores and restaurants, many people do. Indeed, the more converts and customers the wholesome-food movement’s purveyors seek, the stronger their incentive to emphasize foods that light up precisely the same pleasure centers as a 3 Musketeers bar. That just makes wholesome food stealthily obesogenic.
A repeatedly elevated blood pressure exceeding 140 over 90 mmHg — a systolic pressure above 140 with a diastolic pressure above 90. Chronic hypertension is a “silent” condition that can cause blood vessel changes in the back of the eye (retina), abnormal thickening of the heart muscle, kidney failure, and brain damage.
The three-decade, nationwide rise in obesity has resulted in $150 billion a year in obesity-related health care costs, according to the CDC, and researchers say that figure is projected to more than double to $344 billion before the end of the decade.
Note: The health risks associated with obesity mentioned above are just examples of some of the most common concerns, as might be included in first-level courses in health sciences e.g. A-Level Human Biology (16-18 year-olds in UK).
The benefit also can’t be used by endocrinologists, who might be managing a person’s diabetes, or by cardiologists, who monitor patients with heart disease. Both conditions can be caused or made worse by excess weight.
Another useful method is to take a waist measurement because fat in the centre of the body (apple-shaped obesity) is much more strongly linked to health risks than fat more widely distributed on the arms and legs. Women with waist of 80cm or greater and men with a waist of 94cm or greater are more likely to develop obesity-related health problems.
Preventing obesity, or losing weight if you are obese, is about having awareness of the daily choices you make. Understanding the causes and consequences of obesity is the first step towards a healthy lifestyle. The next step is up to you.
Searches of MEDLINE (and MEDLINE In-Process), EMBASE, CINAHL and AGELINE were conducted to identify relevant studies from 1980 to September 2009. Additional studies were identified from searching bibliographies of retrieved articles and by consulting a clinical expert in the area. We identified English-language articles that addressed risk factors, differential diagnosis, prognosis, investigation or treatment of unintentional weight loss among adults 65 years of age or older. Further details on the search can be found in Appendix 1, available at www.cmaj.ca/cgi/content/full/cmaj.101471/DC1. We excluded articles that specifically focused on weight loss associated with cancer or HIV infection. All types of articles were considered for inclusion except for case reports, editorials and meeting abstracts. All patients, regardless of where they lived, were included in the review. Two reviewers (S.S. and E.M.A or J.H-L) independently reviewed all identified citations to select relevant publications that met the inclusion criteria. In cases of doubt, full-text articles were retrieved for review and discussion.
44. Bacon CG, Mittleman MA, Kawachi I, Giovannucci E, Glasser DB, Rimm EB: Sexual function in men older than 50 years of age: results from the health professionals follow-up study. Ann Intern Med 2003; 139: 161– 168 [PubMed]
For many of us, life gets better—easier, even—as we get older. We get more comfortable and confident in our own skin. We weed out what doesn’t work for us and invite more of what does work into our lives. There’s a certain clarity that inspires us not to sweat the small stuff so much and to keep the big picture in mind.
[3] Ogden C, Carroll MD, Lawman, HG, Fryar CD, Kruszon-Moran D, et al. Trends in obesity among children and adolescents in the United States, 1988- 1994 through 2013- 2014. The Journal of the American Medical Association. 2016;315(21):2292–2299. Available at http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2526638 or https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27272581.
When the BMI is above 25, a person is considered overweight. When it’s above 30, the person is obese. Although BMI is useful for men and women, it does have limitations. For example, BMI may overestimate body fat in individuals who have a highly muscular build such as athletes and underestimate it in people who have lost muscle (for example, those who are recovering from surgery or cancer).
The association between obesity and cancer is not quite as clear as that for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This is due in part to the fact that cancer is not a single disease but a collection of individual diseases.
“Obesity has become the new smoking—it’s a major driver of ill health, with coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes highest on the list of preventable illnesses. Obesity also costs billions of dollars to our economy each year. Anything we can do to mitigate the damage being done to both generations of Australians by obesity will be hugely important for the future of our nation.”
Patricia Rockwood has been a professional copy editor and writer for more than 25 years. She is an avid gardener with a certified Florida backyard habitat. Rockwood has practiced yoga for more than 40 years and taught for much of that time. She is also a professional mosaic artist.
A third study examined the impact of physical training and nutrition.18 Fifty-eight older, community-dwelling individuals were randomized to one of the following four groups: a physical training program (involving aerobic, muscle strength and balance training), a nutritional intervention program (involving individually targeted advice and group sessions), a combination of the first two interventions, or a control group. At baseline and then again at 12 weeks, subjects were screened for physical performance. Intention-to-treat analysis showed a significant improvement in both training groups compared with the nutritional group. The nutritional interventions showed no significant improvement over the control group.
Choose a report:2018 Health of Women and Children Report2017 Annual Report2017 Health of Women Who Have Served2017 Senior Report2016 Annual Report2016 Health of Those Who Have Served Report2016 Health of Women and Children Report2016 Senior Report2015 Annual Report
The convenience of home-delivered meals makes them a great option to help people stay in their own home, for a longer period of time. When you are spending less time preparing meals, this allows seniors to stay socially engaged and more active on a daily basis. Senior nutrition is vital to increase quality of life and maintain health in older adults.
Obesity-related inflammation may affect other medical conditions. Researchers know obesity causes inflammation in our bodies. NHLBI is interested in how obesity-related inflammation influences other conditions, such as cardiovascular diseases or asthma.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *