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Another prospective trial randomized 29 dieticians to the provision of usual nutritional care or a new medical nutritional therapy protocol for prevention and treatment of unexplained weight loss among long-term care residents.19 The new protocol emphasized assessment; intervention (including weighing frequency); communication with staff, medical doctor, family and resident; and reassessment. Fourteen out of 364 residents (4%) admitted with significant pre-existing weight loss were successfully treated within 90 days after admission. Dieticians in both groups were equally successful at treating pre-existing weight loss when it was identified. Differences were found in nutritional care activities. Dieticians providing the new protocol reported more nutritional assessment activities, whereas dieticians providing usual care reported more interventional activities.
There are mental complications as well. Obesity affects cognition, which includes the way we process information, memory, comprehension, problem solving, and decisions. These functions are known to deteriorate with age, and studies show that they deteriorate more rapidly in the population affected by obesity. Since proper cognition help seniors to live fuller and more independent lives, this effect of obesity is more relevant than ever as we age.
The weight-loss program should be directed toward a slow, steady weight loss unless your doctor feels your health condition would benefit from more rapid weight loss. Expect to lose only about a pound a week after the first week or two. With many calorie-restricted diets there is an initial rapid weight loss during the first one to two weeks, but this loss is largely fluid.
Past research published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine has shown the baby boomer generation has its share of pervasive health problems, including high rates of cholesterol and hypertension. The authors concluded that there’s a need for policies that encourage prevention efforts and healthy-behavior promotion among boomers.
At a moment when many of his former voters believe that America is facing a genuine democratic crisis, former President Barack Obama has been largely silent about what is happening in American politics. Other than a handful of appearances—an interview with David Letterman in a new Netflix show, or an oral history project at MIT—he insists on following protocol and tradition for former presidents, resisting the temptation to jump back into the political fray.
Treatment of obesity depends primarily on how overweight a person is and his or her overall health. However, to be successful, any treatment must affect life-long behavioral changes rather than short-term weight loss. “Yo-yo” dieting, in which weight is repeatedly lost and regained, has been shown to increase a person’s likelihood of developing fatal health problems than if the weight had been lost gradually or not lost at all. Behavior-focused treatment should concentrate on:
350 pounds is the maximum weight a standard hospital bed can handle, and there is no national census to increase the weight or offer additional beds for heavier patients. Because of the expensive costs of the equipment, staffing issues and increased health problems, assisted living communities and nursing homes rarely accept more than few markedly obese patients.
Sugar drinks are the largest source of added sugar in the diets of children and adolescents. Increasing consumption of these high caloric beverages that offer little or no nutrients is associated with the increasing rates of childhood obesity.
Although people can control what they eat and how much they exercise, age comes with certain uncontrollable factors. For instance, you lose lean body mass as you age. “The more lean body mass we have, the higher our metabolic rate is and the more efficiently we burn calories,” says Carmen Roberts, clinical dietician specialist with Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. Therefore, reduced lean body mass lowers your metabolism, thus, lowering the amount of calories needed and increasing the amount of physical activity needed.
Jump up ^ McGreevy PD, Thomson PC, Pride C, Fawcett A, Grassi T, Jones B (May 2005). “Prevalence of obesity in dogs examined by Australian veterinary practices and the risk factors involved”. Vet. Rec. 156 (22): 695–702. doi:10.1136/vr.156.22.695. PMID 15923551.
A 2016 review supported excess food as the primary factor.[87] Dietary energy supply per capita varies markedly between different regions and countries. It has also changed significantly over time.[86] From the early 1970s to the late 1990s the average food energy available per person per day (the amount of food bought) increased in all parts of the world except Eastern Europe. The United States had the highest availability with 3,654 calories (15,290 kJ) per person in 1996.[86] This increased further in 2003 to 3,754 calories (15,710 kJ).[86] During the late 1990s Europeans had 3,394 calories (14,200 kJ) per person, in the developing areas of Asia there were 2,648 calories (11,080 kJ) per person, and in sub-Saharan Africa people had 2,176 calories (9,100 kJ) per person.[86][88] Total food energy consumption has been found to be related to obesity.[89]
Jump up ^ Keith SW, Redden DT, Katzmarzyk PT, Boggiano MM, Hanlon EC, Benca RM, Ruden D, Pietrobelli A, Barger JL, Fontaine KR, Wang C, Aronne LJ, Wright SM, Baskin M, Dhurandhar NV, Lijoi MC, Grilo CM, DeLuca M, Westfall AO, Allison DB (2006). “Putative contributors to the secular increase in obesity: Exploring the roads less traveled”. Int J Obes (Lond) (Review). 30 (11): 1585–94. doi:10.1038/sj.ijo.0803326. PMID 16801930.
Several areas of research are exploring mechanisms that link obesity and cancer (29, 46). One research area involves understanding the role of the microbes that live in the human gastrointestinal tract (collectively called the gut microbiota, or microbiome) in both type 2 diabetes and obesity. Both conditions are associated with dysbiosis, an imbalance in the collection of these microbes. For example, the gut microbiomes of obese people are different from, and less diverse than, those of non-obese people. Imbalances in the gut microbiota are associated with inflammation, altered metabolism, and genotoxicity, which may in turn be related to cancer. Experiments in mice show that the microbiome may influence the efficacy of some types of cancer treatment, particular immunotherapy (47, 48). Researchers are beginning to think about ways to change the microbiota of cancer patients to improve their outcomes.
Christensen’s past weight-loss efforts didn’t last, but the latest one did in part because she committed to Weight Watchers and works with a personal trainer. Meanwhile, the Acostas attribute much of their success to the structure of the YMCA program. “It really showed me what I should and should not do,” Elena Acosta says.
The Sony World Photography Awards, an annual competition hosted by the World Photography Organisation, just announced its shortlist of winners for 2018. This year’s contest attracted nearly 320,000 entries from more than 200 countries. The organizers have again been kind enough to share some of their shortlisted and commended images with us, gathered below. Overall winners are scheduled to be announced on April 19. All captions below come from the photographers.
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Bittman is hardly alone in his reflexive dismissals. No sooner had McDonald’s and Burger King rolled out their egg-white sandwich and turkey burger, respectively, than a spate of articles popped up hooting that the new dishes weren’t healthier because they trimmed a mere 50 and 100 calories from their standard counterparts, the Egg McMuffin and the Whopper. Apparently these writers didn’t understand, or chose to ignore, the fact that a reduction of 50 or 100 calories in a single dish places an eater exactly on track to eliminate a few hundred calories a day from his or her diet—the critical threshold needed for long-term weight loss. Any bigger reduction would risk leaving someone too hungry to stick to a diet program. It’s just the sort of small step in the right direction we should be aiming for, because the obese are much more likely to take it than they are to make a big leap to wholesome or very-low-calorie foods.
“The growth in the older population is fundamentally a success story from a public health perspective—new advances in medicine and living standards have led to longer life expectancies,” says Mark Mather, associate vice president for U.S. programs at PRB and principal author of the new report.
While there are other measures of obesity, including abdominal fat and waist circumference, researchers generally define it according to body mass index, or BMI. The BMI formula divides an individual’s weight by the square of height, then multiplies the result by 703. The math is not without controversy: Some health experts charge that for people with large muscle mass, the calculations may unfairly skew them into overweight or obese categories.
Overweight and obesity are major risk factors for a number of chronic diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer and while it was once an issue only in high income countries, overweight and obesity has now dramatically risen in low- and middle-income countries.Such countries are now facing a “double burden” of disease, for while they continue to deal with the problems of infectious disease and under-nutrition, they are also experiencing a rapid upsurge in chronic disease risk factors such as obesity and overweight, particularly in urban settings.
Shah et al. (2009) recruited 18 obese older adults. The participants were sedentary (≤ 2 exercise sessions per week), and were weight and medication stable. The intervention energy deficit was 500–1000 kcal per day, with three exercise sessions per week progressing to moderate intensity (~85% of peak heart rate). Intra hepatic fat (IHF) content was measured by Occipital Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1H-MRS). There was a 50% reduction in IHF with 9% weight loss that was consistent with findings in younger subjects (Petersen 2005; Sato 2007). The investigators reported that the liver appeared to readily mobilize intrahepatic triglycerides in response to negative energy balance. However, exercise training plus diet did not have an additive effect, consistent with previous reports (Tamura 2005; Larson-Meyer 2006).

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