“obesity statistics ons obesity in america national geographic”

This first step is an obvious one that you’ve probably heard or tried more times than you’d like to remember.  But it’s a necessary first step that, if achieved, will be the most rewarding and healthy weight loss option.
Diet modification incorporating patient preferences, softer food consistency to accommodate for chewing or swallowing disabilities, and assisted feeding may lead to weight gain and improved laboratory parameters; however, study results of this approach are mixed.28–30 Creating a more leisurely eating environment simulating an in-home dining experience may improve nutrition in nursing home residents.31
For the better part of 71 years, Joe Acosta ate what he wanted or what his wife prepared for him – often, large portions of fried foods. As a result, he carried 30-some pounds of extra weight and flirted with diabetes. “I was having problems watching what I put in my body,” says Acosta, a retired U.S. Postal Service employee in Brooklyn, New York.
When a person’s heart beats, it creates a force to pump blood, pushing it against arterial walls. That force is called blood pressure. Low blood pressure helps the body function normally, but sustained high blood pressure can damage it in many ways. For one, it can lead to hardening of the arteries, which decreases the flow of blood and oxygen to the heart. When the heart isn’t receiving enough blood or oxygen, the risk for chest pain (angina), heart failure, or heart attack increases. High blood pressure is also a risk factor for kidney disease, aneurysms, and bursting or bleeding of blood vessels in the eyes, which can lead to vision changes or blindness. Your chances of having high blood pressure increase if you’re overweight or obese.
Gordon’s team then repeated the experiment with one small twist: after giving the baby mice microbes from their respective twins, they moved the animals into a shared cage. This time both groups remained lean. Studies showed that the mice carrying microbes from the obese human had picked up some of their lean roommates’ gut bacteria—especially varieties of Bacteroidetes—probably by consuming their feces, a typical, if unappealing, mouse behavior. To further prove the point, the researchers transferred 54 varieties of bacteria from some lean mice to those with the obese-type community of germs and found that the animals that had been destined to become obese developed a healthy weight instead. Transferring just 39 strains did not do the trick. “Taken together, these experiments provide pretty compelling proof that there is a cause-and-effect relationship and that it was possible to prevent the development of obesity,” Gordon says.
Unintentional or involuntary weight loss is a common phenomenon among older adults, with an annual incidence of approximately 13%.1 Problematic weight loss in the older adult is defined by the United States Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987 (Title IV: subtitle C: Nursing Home Reform) as a loss of 5% of body weight in one month or 10% over a period of six months or longer.2,3 In review, we focus on unintentional weight loss for which no organic cause can be found, although frequently, the loss of weight may be associated with chronic conditions.3 Older patients who involuntarily lose substantial amounts of weight without an obvious cause can pose difficult diagnostic and management dilemmas for physicians.
Researchers say current life expectancy predictions were based on obesity rates in 1988-1994, which was the midpoint of the obesity epidemic and included many older adults born in 1885-1976 who had much lower obesity rates over their lifetimes.
Acupressure and acupuncture can also suppress food cravings. Visualization and meditation can create and reinforce a positive self-image that enhances the patient’s determination to lose weight. By improving physical strength, mental concentration, and emotional serenity, yoga can provide the same benefits. Also, patients who play soft, slow music during meals often find that they eat less food but enjoy it more.
Use a scale of 1 to 10 to judge your activity level, with 10 as the most vigorous activity. For moderate activity, you are at a 5 or 6 and can still talk or sing a song. Vigorous activity is a 7 or 8 on the intensity scale; your heart rate is high and you aren’t able to talk more than a few words. Always check with your doctor before starting a new fitness program.
Weight loss through calorie reduction or exercise is generally good for most people as an intervention in obesity, although the appropriateness of these methods has historically been a matter of controversy in older adults who are overweight.
Skin conditions. Brown, Wimpenny, and Maughan (2004) found skin problems, including itching, skin breakdown, redness, and rashes, in 75% of the obese population they sampled. The two main causes of the reported skin problems were perspiration and friction. Groin, limbs, and under breasts were identified as the most troubling areas. Older adults who are obese and have skin problems face additional complications because their skin naturally loses about 20% of its dermal thickness with age (Baranoski, 2001). This combination of older age, fragile skin, and obesity increases the risk for pressure sores (Flood & Newman, 2007).
The BMI does not tke count for mass of muscle versus mass of fat. A BMI both below and above the so-called normal values can be healthy if there is little fat, but well developed muscle mass. And a person with a BMI less that 18.5 can be too fat if the muscle mass is very scant, but much fat.
According to a recent study, Americans get 11 percent of their calories, on average, from fast food—a number that’s almost certainly much higher among the less affluent overweight. As a result, the fast-food industry may be uniquely positioned to improve our diets. Research suggests that calorie counts in a meal can be trimmed by as much as 30 percent without eaters noticing—by, for example, reducing portion sizes and swapping in ingredients that contain more fiber and water. Over time, that could be much more than enough to literally tip the scales for many obese people. “The difference between losing weight and not losing weight,” says Robert Kushner, the obesity scientist and clinical director at Northwestern, “is a few hundred calories a day.”
Doctors may also note how a person carries excess weight on his or her body. Studies have shown that this factor may indicate whether or not an individual has a predisposition to develop certain diseases or conditions that may accompany obesity. “Apple-shaped” individuals who store most of their weight around the waist and abdomen are at greater risk for cancer, heart disease, stroke, and diabetes than “pear-shaped” people whose extra pounds settle primarily in their hips and thighs.

One Reply to ““obesity statistics ons obesity in america national geographic””

  1. For those who don’t have the time to make it to support groups, there are now many free or low-cost apps available for the iPhone, iPad, or Android, which help determine and track calories, nutrition, and calorie expenditure. Try LoseIt!, Weight Watchers Mobile, Restaurant Nutrition, 40:30:30, Diet Point, Noom Weight Loss Coach, FitBit, Fooducate, Diet Assistance, Calorie Counter PRO MyNet Diary, Amwell, MyFitnessPal, or 7-Minute Workout.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *