“obesity statistics local authority |obesity definition and epidemiology”

Davidson says people with high cholesterol do better with low-saturated fat diets that call for low-fat dairy sources, lean red meats and fish. It’s important for seniors with high cholesterol to avoid sweet baked goods with trans fats, he says: “We now recognize that trans fats as especially bad among all the fats we can consume.”
The good news is that losing a small amount of weight can reduce your chances of developing heart disease or a stroke. Reducing your weight by 10% can decrease your chance of developing heart disease.
We fund research. Our Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, which includes our Clinical Applications and Prevention Branch, funds research to understand how overweight and obesity relate to heart disease. Our Division of Lung Diseases funds research on the impact of overweight and obesity on sleep disordered breathing. The research we fund today will help improve our future health. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) to learn about research NHLBI is funding on overweight and obesity.
NIH task force to develop first nutrition strategic plan. We will collaborate with other institutes to develop a ten-year plan to increase research in nutrition, including experimental design and training. Visit NIH task force formed to develop first nutrition strategic plan for more information.
Apple-shaped people whose fat is concentrated mostly in the abdomen are more likely to develop many of the health problems associated with obesity. They are at increased health risk because of their fat distribution. While obesity of any kind is a health risk, it is better to be a pear than an apple.
“Weight gain is occurring, but it’s not just because of aging,” says Wojtek Chodzko-Zajko, head of the Department of Kinesiology and Community Health at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. “It’s what we eat, our lifestyle habits, how much screen time we get … all of those kinds of factors are having an impact.”
Your doctor may diagnose overweight and obesity based on your medical history, physical exams that confirm you have a high body mass index (BMI) and possibly a high waist circumference, and tests to rule out other medical conditions.
The most likely culprits for weight gain and obesity are food intake and sedentary lifestyles, though genetic factors can also play a role. Sweetened beverages (sodas and juices) and potato chips are two of the biggest contributors, along with our alarmingly-large portion sizes. Ever-increasing access to fast food and processed foods also play a major role.Sedentary lifestyles are also a major cause of obesity and weight gain. And while our society has become more sedentary as a whole, seniors – already less active than other age groups –feel the impact on their waistlines even more.
The branch of medicine that deals with the study and treatment of obesity is known as bariatrics. As obesity has become a major health problem in the United States, bariatrics has become a separate medical and surgical specialty.
Obesity and Stroke. Ischemic (clot-caused) stroke and coronary artery disease share many of the same disease processes and risk factors. A meta-analysis of 25 prospective cohort studies with 2.3 million participants demonstrated a direct, graded association between excess weight and stroke risk. Overweight increased the risk of ischemic stroke by 22 percent, and obesity increased it by 64 percent. There was no significant relationship between overweight or obesity and hemorrhagic (bleeding-caused) stroke, however. (10) A repeat analysis that statistically accounted for blood pressure, cholesterol, and diabetes weakened the associations, suggesting that these factors mediate the effect of obesity on stroke.
The BMI is a measure of your weight in relation to your height, and your waist circumference measures your abdominal fat. Combining these with information about your additional risk factors will give you an idea of your risk for developing obesity-associated diseases.
Non-prescription orlistat (Alli). Orlistat inhibits fat absorption in the intestine. Until recently, this medication was only available by prescription (Xenical). The over-the-counter medicine is sold at a lower dose than Xenical. But the active ingredient is the same.
1. Ogden CL, Carroll MD, McDowell MA, Flegal KM. Obesity among adults in the United States— no change since 2003–2004. NCHS data brief no 1. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2007 http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/index.html
Heart attack. A prospective study found that the risk of developing coronary artery disease increased three to four times in women who had a BMI greater than 29. A Finnish study showed that for every 1 kilogram (2.2 pounds) increase in body weight, the risk of death from coronary artery disease increased by 1%. In patients who have already had a heart attack, obesity is associated with an increased likelihood of a second heart attack.
It is not necessary to achieve an “ideal weight” to derive health benefits from obesity treatment. Instead, the goal of treatment should be to reach and hold to a “healthier weight.” The emphasis of treatment should be to commit to the process of lifelong healthy living, including eating more wisely and increasing physical activity.
Another dynamic may be at work, said Martin. Not only could the reported increases in disability reflect actual deteriorating health, but it could also reflect greater awareness of health conditions in the wake of more widespread diagnosis and treatment.
Jump up ^ Flegal, Katherine M.; Kit, Brian K.; Orpana, Heather; Graubard, Barry I. (2 January 2013). “Association of All-Cause Mortality With Overweight and Obesity Using Standard Body Mass Index Categories”. JAMA. 309 (1): 71–82. doi:10.1001/jama.2012.113905. PMID 23280227.
The reason it’s vitally important for you to take alongside exercising is it’s role in wound repair. Vitamin C creates collagen, a component necessary for healing. If there’s any risk of your damaging yourself with exercise, you’ll want to make sure you’re healthy enough to repair it.
Another great source for senior nutrition and weight loss is the National Institute of Health’s article, entitled Healthy Eating after 50, which provides answers to questions like, “How much food should I eat?” and “Should I cut back on salt or fat?” This article provides two optional meal plan ideas, and a guide for water, a guide for increasing fiber intake, and what to do if your senior is having problems with food intake.
Researchers say current life expectancy predictions were based on obesity rates in 1988-1994, which was the midpoint of the obesity epidemic and included many older adults born in 1885-1976 who had much lower obesity rates over their lifetimes.
Goodpaster BH, Carlson CL, Visser M, Kelley DE, Scherzinger A, Harris TB, Stamm E, Newman AB. Attenuation of skeletal muscle and strength in the elderly: The Health ABC Study. J Appl Physiol. 2001;90:2157–2165. [PubMed]
Begin increasing your activity level. Try to get up and move around your home more frequently. Start gradually if you aren’t in good shape or aren’t used to exercising. Even a 10-minute daily walk can help. If you have any health conditions, or if you’re a man over age 40 or a woman over age 50, wait until you’ve talked to your doctor or health care provider before you start a new exercise program.
Mirtazapine (Remeron), a serotonin antagonist used to treat depression, has gained interest as a possible treatment for unintentional weight loss in older patients because 12% of patients who take this drug for depression report weight gain.36 Although no literature exists to support its use for unintentional weight loss, mirtazapine may be an option for older patients with depression who also have unintentional weight loss. Because dizziness and orthostatic hypotension are possible adverse effects of mirtazapine, caution is warranted in patients at risk of falls.36,37
Jensen, M.D., D.H. Ryan, C.M. Apovian, et al. “2013 AHA/ACC/TOS guideline for the management of overweight and obesity in adults: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines and the Obesity Society.” Circulation 129 (2014): S102.
“In older, obese people, it may be more important to improve physical function and quality of life, rather than to reverse or treat risk factors for cardiovascular disease,” says Villareal, now chief of geriatrics at the New Mexico Veterans Affairs Health Care System and professor of medicine at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine, both in Albuquerque. “Combining exercise and weight loss isn’t designed so much to extend their life expectancy as it is to improve their quality of life during their remaining years and to help seniors avoid being admitted to a nursing home.”
“Of the ranked diets, both DASH and the Mediterranean diet can help people with both diabetes prevention and management,” Campbell says. They work because they encourage a variety of foods and make people aware of the carbs they consume, she adds. Both diets are mentioned in the latest nutrition guidelines ​from the American Diabetes Association.
Bittman is hardly alone in his reflexive dismissals. No sooner had McDonald’s and Burger King rolled out their egg-white sandwich and turkey burger, respectively, than a spate of articles popped up hooting that the new dishes weren’t healthier because they trimmed a mere 50 and 100 calories from their standard counterparts, the Egg McMuffin and the Whopper. Apparently these writers didn’t understand, or chose to ignore, the fact that a reduction of 50 or 100 calories in a single dish places an eater exactly on track to eliminate a few hundred calories a day from his or her diet—the critical threshold needed for long-term weight loss. Any bigger reduction would risk leaving someone too hungry to stick to a diet program. It’s just the sort of small step in the right direction we should be aiming for, because the obese are much more likely to take it than they are to make a big leap to wholesome or very-low-calorie foods.
If you’re struggling to be interested in food or you’ve lost the motivation to eat, try to eat with friends or family as often as possible. Lunch clubs are also a great way to make mealtimes more social.
This study will see if vitamin D supplements improve vascular health and reduce risk factors for cardiovascular disease in overweight or obese children who have vitamin D deficiency. Children must be 10 years or older to participate. Visit Vitamin D and Vascular Health in Children for more information and to learn how to participate in the study.
If a person’s bodyweight is at least 20% higher than it should be, he or she is considered If your Body Mass Index (BMI) is between 25 and 29.9 you are considered overweight. If your BMI is 30 or over you are considered obese. If you’re wondering what your ideal weight might be, take a look at our article, how much should I weigh?
In Sacramento, 56 percent of obese baby boomers have high blood pressure, the UCLA figures show, compared with 23 percent of boomers with a normal body weight. More than one-fifth of obese baby boomers in the region have diabetes. Forty percent suffer from arthritis: Not surprisingly, the number of boomers using assistive devices, such as canes and walkers, is on the rise, as well. Almost 20 percent of obese boomers can’t work due to disability.
Follow a healthy eating plan. Focus on low-calorie, nutrient-dense foods, such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Avoid saturated fat and limit sweets and alcohol. Eat three regular meals a day with limited snacking. You can still enjoy small amounts of high-fat, high-calorie foods as an infrequent treat. Just be sure to choose foods that promote a healthy weight and good health most of the time.
20. Wei Hing, Young K. Responses to nutrition interventions aimed at increasing food intake in seniors with Alzheimer’s disease and their associations with body mass index, cognitive impairment and behavioral difficulties. Toronto (ON): University of Toronto; 2004
Jump up ^ Oreopoulos A, Padwal R, Norris CM, Mullen JC, Pretorius V, Kalantar-Zadeh K (February 2008). “Effect of obesity on short- and long-term mortality postcoronary revascularization: A meta-analysis”. Obesity (Silver Spring) (Meta-analysis). 16 (2): 442–50. doi:10.1038/oby.2007.36. PMID 18239657.
Unintentional weight loss of more than 4% in a year appears to be an independent predictor of increased mortality (relative risk [RR] 2.43, 95% CI 1.34–4.41).4 In a prospective study of 41 836 women, conducted in the United States as part of the Iowa Women’s Health Study, one or more episodes of unintentional weight loss of more than 20 pounds during adulthood was associated with a 46%–57% higher rate of death.29 A prospective study of 4869 male patients older than 65 years from general practices in 24 towns across the United Kingdom found that unintentional weight loss was associated with higher mortality risk only among those with cancer (adjusted relative risk [ARR] 1.71, 95% CI 1.33–2.19) after adjustment for lifestyle characteristics and pre-existing disease.30 A retrospective chart review of 148 long-term care residents residing in the southeastern United States found that those who lost 5% or more of their body weight within one month were 4.6 times more likely to die within one year.31

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