“obesity rates in america by gender |obesity articles cnn”

Papadakis MA, et al. Nutritional disorders. Current Medical Diagnosis & Treatment 2014. 53rd ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2014. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed March 9, 2015
Assessment for depression and dementia is also vital because both have been shown to contribute to unintentional weight loss in older adults.1 The two-question Patient Health Questionnaire (available at https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0715/p244.html) and the Geriatric Depression Scale (available at https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/1115/p1149.html) are validated screening tools for depression in older adults.24,25 The Mini-Cognitive Assessment Instrument (Mini-Cog; available at https://www.aafp.org/afp/2009/0315/p497.html) is the preferred screening tool for dementia because of its ease of use.26
Nicki Howell started her professional writing career in 2002, specializing in areas such as health, fitness and personal finance. She has been published at health care websites, such as HealthTree, and is a ghostwriter for a variety of small health care organizations. She earned a Bachelor of Science in business administration from Portland State University.
A cross-sectional study of 68 community-dwelling older adults in the midwestern United States (with an average age of 86 years and 51 of whom were women) showed that depression (using the Geriatric Depression Scale) was independently associated with weight loss (OR 1.65, 95% CI 1.12–2.43).12 Another prospective study (n = 309) found that psychiatric and psychological diseases are one of the primary reasons for unexplained weight loss.9
Your doctor will ask about your eating and physical activity habits, family history, and will see if you have other risk factors Your doctor may ask if you have any other signs or symptoms. This information can help determine if you have other conditions that may be causing you to be overweight or obese or if you have complications from being overweight or obese.
If you think you may be obese, and especially if you’re concerned about weight-related health problems, see your doctor or health care provider. You and your provider can evaluate your health risks and discuss your weight-loss options.
Physical activity. Many health benefits are associated with physical activity and getting the recommended amount of physical activity needed each week. Physical activity is an important factor in determining whether a person can maintain a healthy body weight, lose excess body weight, or maintain successful weight loss. Before starting any exercise program, ask your doctor about what level of physical activity is right for you. Visit Physical Activity Has Many Health Benefits for more information.
van Geel M, Vedder P, Tanilon J. Are overweight and obese youths more often bullied by their peers? A meta-analysis on the correlation between weight status and bullying. Int J Obes (Lond). 2014;38(10):1263–1267.
Excess of subcutaneous fat in proportion to lean body mass. Excess fat accumulation is associated with increase in size (hypertrophy) as well as number (hyperplasia) of adipose tissue cells. Obesity is variously defined in terms of absolute weight, weight:height ratio, distribution of subcutaneous fat, and societal and esthetic norms. Although faulty eating habits related to failure of normal satiety feedback mechanisms may be responsible for some cases, many obese people neither consume more calories nor eat different proportions of foodstuffs than nonobese people. Contrary to popular belief, obesity is not caused by disorders of pituitary, thyroid, or suprarenal gland metabolism. However, it is often associated with hyperinsulinism and relative insulin resistance. Studies of obese twins strongly suggest the presence of genetic influences on resting metabolic rate, feeding behavior, changes in energy expenditures in response to overfeeding, lipoprotein lipase activity, and basal rate of lipolysis. Environmental factors associated with obesity include socioeconomic status, race, geographic region of residence, season, urban, or rural residence, and being a member of a smaller family. Prevalence is greater when weight is measured during winter rather than summer; is much more common in the southeastern U.S., although northeastern and midwestern states also have high rates, a phenomenon independent of race, population density, and season.
The World Health Organization (2005) has noted that life-threatening illnesses related to obesity include cardiovascular disease; conditions associated with insulin resistance, such as type 2 diabetes; certain types of cancers, especially hormonally related and large-bowel cancer; and gallbladder disease. The next few sections will discuss these illnesses.
Gallbladder cancer: Compared with normal-weight people, people who are overweight have a slight (about 20%) increase in risk of gallbladder cancer, and people who are obese have a 60% increase in risk of gallbladder cancer (19, 20). The risk increase is greater in women than men.
In people with heart failure, those with a BMI between 30.0 and 34.9 had lower mortality than those with a normal weight. This has been attributed to the fact that people often lose weight as they become progressively more ill.[76] Similar findings have been made in other types of heart disease. People with class I obesity and heart disease do not have greater rates of further heart problems than people of normal weight who also have heart disease. In people with greater degrees of obesity, however, the risk of further cardiovascular events is increased.[77][78] Even after cardiac bypass surgery, no increase in mortality is seen in the overweight and obese.[79] One study found that the improved survival could be explained by the more aggressive treatment obese people receive after a cardiac event.[80] Another found that if one takes into account chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in those with PAD, the benefit of obesity no longer exists.[75]
Strength training targets two vital components that gain vulnerability with age: bones and muscles. Dr. Cheskin recommends beginning with a set of light weights, such as 5 lb. weights. Legs, arms, and core are the key areas to work.
One problem with using weight-for-height tables is that doctors disagree over which is the best table to use. Several versions are available. Many have different weight ranges, and some tables account for a person’s frame size, age and sex, while other tables do not.
Adapted with permission from The clinical and cost-effectiveness of medical nutrition therapies: evidence and estimates of potential medical savings from the use of selected nutritional intervention. June 1996. Summary report prepared for the Nutrition Screening Initiative, a project of the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Dietetic Association, and the National Council on Aging, Inc.
To help the nation’s 13 million obese seniors, the Affordable Care Act included a new Medicare benefit offering face-to-face weight loss counseling in primary care doctors’ offices. It is free for patients, with no copay. But while Medicare now pays doctors to counsel their obese patients, only 50,000 people participated in 2013, the latest year for which data is available.
A disorder of lipoprotein metabolism, including lipoprotein overproduction or deficiency. Dyslipidemias may be manifested by elevation of the total cholesterol, the “bad” low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and the triglyceride concentrations, and a decrease in the “good” high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentration in the blood. Dyslipidemia comes under consideration in many situations including diabetes, a common cause of lipidemia. For adults with diabetes, it has been recommended that the levels of LDL, HDL, and total cholesterol, and triglyceride be measured every year. Optimal LDL cholesterol levels for adults with diabetes are less than 100 mg/dL (2.60 mmol/L), optimal HDL cholesterol levels are e4qual to or greater than 40 mg/dL (1.02 mmol/L), and desirable triglyceride levels are less than 150 mg/dL (1.7 mmol/L).
Genetics. Your genes may affect the amount of body fat you store, and where that fat is distributed. Genetics may also play a role in how efficiently your body converts food into energy and how your body burns calories during exercise.
Eat less “energy dense foods.” Energy dense foods are high in fats and simple sugars. They generally have a high calorie value in a small amount of food. The United States government currently recommends that a healthy diet should have less than 30% fat. Fat contains twice as many calories per unit weight than protein or carbohydrates. Examples of high-energy dense foods include red meat, egg yolks, fried foods, high fat/sugar fast foods, sweets, pastries, butter, and high-fat salad dressings. Also cut down on foods that provide calories but very little nutrition, such as alcohol, non-diet soft drinks, and many packaged high-calorie snack foods.
Apple-shaped people whose fat is concentrated mostly in the abdomen are more likely to develop many of the health problems associated with obesity. They are at increased health risk because of their fat distribution. While obesity of any kind is a health risk, it is better to be a pear than an apple.
With the American Medical Association’s 2013 classification of obesity as a chronic disease,[16] it is thought that health insurance companies will more likely pay for obesity treatment, counseling and surgery, and the cost of research and development of fat treatment pills or gene therapy treatments should be more affordable if insurers help to subsidize their cost.[217] The AMA classification is not legally binding, however, so health insurers still have the right to reject coverage for a treatment or procedure.[217]
Increased pressure within the brain in the absence of a tumor. Symptoms may include headache, nausea, vomiting, pulsating intracranial noises, singing in the ears, double vision, loss of visual accuracy, and even blindness.
Frimel et al. (2008) reported on a cohort of 30 community-living frail older adults. The participants were sedentary (≤ 2 exercise sessions per week); had stable medications and stable weight (± 2 kg over the past year); and met two out of three criteria for mild–moderate physical frailty. The intervention used was similar to the previously included Villareal studies (Villareal 2006a; Villareal 2006b; Villareal 2008) with a slightly higher daily energy deficit (750 kcal per day versus 500–700 kcal/day). The goal was 10% loss of body weight over six months. Combined aerobic and resistance exercise sessions were 90 minutes three times per week and resistance exercises focused on upper extremity (UE) and lower extremity (LE) muscle groups. The loss of lean body mass was completely prevented in the UE, but not LE. Despite LE lean body mass loss, strength improved. It was proposed that muscle quality improved due to a decrease in muscle fat infiltration and inflammation due to weight loss, as previously reported (Goodpaster 2001; Nicklas 2004). It was also suggested that retention of lean body mass in the UE but not the LE was attributed to UE muscle being more responsive to high-intensity training because these muscle groups are not used regularly for daily activities such as walking and climbing stairs.
First, these surgeries reduce the amount of food stored in the stomach and the amount of calories your body can take in. This can help your body restore energy balance. Second, these surgeries change the levels of certain hormones and the way the brain responds to these hormones to control hunger urges. After surgery, some people are less interested in eating or they prefer to eat healthier foods. In some cases, genetic differences may affect how much weight loss patients experience after bariatric  surgery.
Improved medical care also could be contributing to rising disability, Martin suggested. People whose disabilities began early in life are now living longer. “It could be seen as good news: improved survival for people with Down syndrome or spinal cord injuries who might have not reached middle age in the past,” she said.
They found Generation X had significantly poorer levels of self-rated health, and higher levels of obesity and diabetes compared with Boomers, with no real difference in physical activity between the two groups.
Armamento-Villareal R, Sadler C, Napoli N, Shah K, Chode S, Sinacore DR, Qualls C, Villareal DT. Weight loss in obese older adults increases serum sclerostin and impairs hip geometry but both are prevented by exercise training. J Bone Miner Res. 2012;27:1215–1221. [PMC free article] [PubMed]
Women in the baby boomer generation are somewhat more likely than men of the same age to feel that they are overweight, and less likely to feel that their weight is “about right.” Fifty-nine percent of baby boomer women say they are overweight, compared with 48% of baby boomer men. This is particularly interesting given that according to CDC estimates, men are slightly more likely to be overweight (67%) than women (62%).
12. Uretsky S, Messerli FH, Bangalore S, Champion A, Cooper-Dehoff RM, Zhou Q, Pepine CJ: Obesity paradox in patients with hypertension and coronary artery disease. Am J Med 2007; 120: 863– 870 [PubMed]
During 12 years of follow-up, we observed 1035 incident CVD events and 1902 overall deaths. Obesity was associated with an increased risk of CVD among men (HR 1.57 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17, 2.11)) and women (HR 1.49 (95% CI 1.19, 1.86)), compared with normal weight individuals. Overweight and obesity were not associated with mortality in men and women without CVD. Among men with CVD, obesity compared with normal weight, was associated with a lower risk of mortality (HR 0.67 (95% CI 0.49, 0.90)). Overweight and obesity did not influence total life expectancy. However, obesity was associated with 2.6 fewer years (95% CI −4.8, −0.4) lived free from CVD in men and 1.9 (95% CI −3.3, −0.9) in women. Moreover, men and women with obesity lived 2.9 (95% CI 1.1, 4.8) and 1.7 (95% CI 0.6, 2.8) more years suffering from CVD compared with normal weight counterparts.
In part, it’s because big has become the new normal: big portions, big containers of sugary sodas, big clothing sizes, big people who have established the habit of eating way too much. Just as the culture gradually shifted away from tobacco consumption starting in the 1960s, experts say, it now needs to shift beyond the consumption of too much food.
According to Jesse Slome, executive director of the American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance, a  baby boomer is somebody born between 1946 and about 1965.  “Boomers make up almost one in five U.S. citizens and have a significant impact on the economy,” Slome explains.  “Their impact of health care and long-term care costs could be more than this nation can bear.”

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