“obesity questionnaire for adults |obesity medicine cme”

Performing stretching exercises regularly can help improve flexibility and increase freedom of movement. Every workout should begin and end with proper stretching exercises to help warm up and soothe the muscles. Stretching, along with strength exercises, can also improve balance, which can help reduce the risk of falling, particularly important for elderly individuals.
Unhealthy diet and eating habits. Weight gain is inevitable if you regularly eat more calories than you burn. And most Americans’ diets are too high in calories and are full of fast food and high-calorie beverages.
Despite the positive effect of bariatric surgery on weight and obesity health problems, it is not the right solution for everyone.  In addition to preparing for and going through with surgery, big sacrifices must be made in life after weight loss surgery for patients to be successful.
Social and economic issues. Research has linked social and economic factors to obesity. Avoiding obesity is difficult if you don’t have safe areas to exercise. Similarly, you may not have been taught healthy ways of cooking, or you may not have money to buy healthier foods. In addition, the people you spend time with may influence your weight — you’re more likely to become obese if you have obese friends or relatives.
The number of obese Americans ages 65 and older will increase from 10.3 million to 14.3 million by 2010, averaging 400,000 new obese adults per year (Arteburn, Crane, & Sullivan, 2004). Today, more than 65% of adults in the United States are overweight or obese. Obesity puts people at risk for heart disease, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, stroke, and some types of cancer.
Calculating your BMI. Your doctor will check your body mass index (BMI) to determine your level of obesity. This should be done at least once a year. Your BMI also helps determine your overall health risk and what treatment may be appropriate.
As a start, aim to lose 1-2 pounds a week. Adults who are overweight or obese should try to lose 5% to 10% of their current weight over 6 months, according to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.
Nevertheless, when the evidence from multiple observational studies is consistent, the association is more likely to be real. Many observational studies have provided consistent evidence that people who have lower weight gain during adulthood have lower risks of colon cancer, kidney cancer, and—for postmenopausal women—breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers (34). 
If the most-influential voices in our food culture today get their way, we will achieve a genuine food revolution. Too bad it would be one tailored to the dubious health fantasies of a small, elite minority. And too bad it would largely exclude the obese masses, who would continue to sicken and die early. Despite the best efforts of a small army of wholesome-food heroes, there is no reasonable scenario under which these foods could become cheap and plentiful enough to serve as the core diet for most of the obese population—even in the unlikely case that your typical junk-food eater would willing and able to break lifelong habits to embrace kale and yellow beets. And many of the dishes glorified by the wholesome-food movement are, in any case, as caloric and obesogenic as anything served in a Burger King.
If you have too much body fat, you are obese, just like over 70 million other Americans. It happens because you eat more calories than you use, and your body converts the excess to fat. There are lots of reasons that this can happen. Our lifestyle may lack exercise, we are given portions that are too big and too caloric when we eat, and some of us are just more efficient genetically at converting food into fat.
Campbell says a very low-fat plan like the Ornish diet might be less appropriate and harder for seniors to follow. Similarly, she says, the Biggest Loser diet would not be ideal, and the phases could be hard to comprehend.
Low levels of spontaneous physical activity is a major predictor of adipose tissue accumulation in humans, and total body movement, most of which is related to ambulation, is negatively correlated with fat mass (32).
Being overweight or obese can cause plaque to accumulate in your arteries. If that plaque breaks free from an artery, it can create a blood clot, and if that clot is close to your brain, it can prevent blood and oxygen from reaching your brain, causing a stroke. The risk of having a stroke corresponds to BMI: high BMI = high risk, and low BMI = low risk. That’s one more good reason for losing excess weight.
Beige fat tissue is seen in the neck, shoulders, back, chest and abdomen of adults and resembles brown fat tissue. This fat type, which uses carbohydrates and fats to produce heat, increases when children and adults are exposed to cold.
Commonly referred to as GERD or acid reflux, is a condition in which the liquid content of the stomach regurgitates (backs up or refluxes) into the esophagus. The liquid can inflame and damage the lining (cause esophagitis) of the esophagus although visible signs of inflammation occur in a minority of patients.
Obesity is the most important risk factor for sleep apnea. A person who is overweight may have more fat stored around his or her neck. This may make the airway smaller. A smaller airway can make breathing difficult or loud (because of snoring), or breathing may stop altogether for short periods of time. In addition, fat stored in the neck and throughout the body may produce substances that cause inflammation. Inflammation in the neck is a risk factor for sleep apnea.
Overweight and obesity may increase the risk of many health problems, including diabetes, heart disease, and certain cancers. If you are pregnant, excess weight may lead to short- and long-term health problems for you and your child.
As designed, body weight and fat mass (FM) decreased significantly in the intervention group. Fat free mass (FFM) decreased in both groups but the difference was not statistically significant. Physical performance test score, peak oxygen consumption, and functional status all significantly improved in the diet and exercise group. Increases in strength were equal to or greater than reported in earlier trials in non-obese older adults completing a similar exercise program (Binder 2002; Villareal 2003; Villareal 2004). The investigators stressed that it was not difficult to change the behavior of these older sedentary adults, showing that it was a feasible intervention, which also provided important social interactions that enhanced compliance.

One Reply to ““obesity questionnaire for adults |obesity medicine cme””

  1. Body composition changes with age. Lean body mass begins to decrease up to 0.7 lb (0.3 kg) per year in the third decade. This loss is offset by gains in fat mass that continue until 65 to 70 years of age. Total body weight usually peaks at 60 years of age with small decreases of 0.2 to 0.4 lb (0.1 to 0.2 kg) per year after 70 years of age. Therefore, substantial weight changes should not be attributed to normal anorexia of aging.10
    The opinions and assertions contained herein are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of the U.S. Air Force Medical Department or the U.S. Air Force at large.
    Vagal blockade involves surgically implanting a device that stimulates the abdominal vagal nerve, thereby sending signals to the brain that say you are full, which can reduce hunger. Short-term studies have shown modest weight loss (about 18 pounds). No long-term studies have been done yet, and some patients develop pain at the implantation site as well as nausea, vomiting, heartburn, and burping.
    The reason it’s vitally important for you to take alongside exercising is it’s role in wound repair. Vitamin C creates collagen, a component necessary for healing. If there’s any risk of your damaging yourself with exercise, you’ll want to make sure you’re healthy enough to repair it.

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