“obesity not a disease |obesity epidemic stats”

Adults: A healthy weight for adults is usually when your BMI is 18.5 to less than 25. To figure out your BMI, use the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute’s online BMI calculator and compare it with the table below. You can also download the BMI calculator app for iPhone and Android.
Gallup data indicate that more than half (53%) of today’s baby boomers (U.S. adults aged 39 to 57) perceive themselves to be either “very” or “somewhat” overweight. This percentage is significantly higher than it is for either the 18- to 39-year-old cohort (30%) or the 75+ year-old cohort (30%), although it is very similar to the percentage for the 58- to 74-year-old category (56%).
Jebb S. and Wells J. Measuring body composition in adults and children In:Peter G. Kopelman; Ian D. Caterson; Michael J. Stock; William H. Dietz (2005). Clinical obesity in adults and children: In Adults and Children. Blackwell Publishing. pp. 12–28. ISBN 1-4051-1672-2.
In some cases, weight-loss surgery, also called bariatric surgery, is an option. Weight-loss surgery limits the amount of food you’re able to comfortably eat or decreases the absorption of food and calories or both. While weight-loss surgery offers the best chance of losing the most weight, it can pose serious risks.
Another useful method is to take a waist measurement because fat in the centre of the body (apple-shaped obesity) is much more strongly linked to health risks than fat more widely distributed on the arms and legs. Women with a waist of 80cm or greater and men with a waist of 94cm or greater are more likely to develop obesity-related health problems.
Much concern has been generated about the increasing incidence of obesity among Americans. Some studies have noted an increase from 12% to 18% occurring between 1991 and 1998. Other studies have actually estimated that a full 50% of all Americans are overweight. The World Health Organization terms obesity a worldwide epidemic, and the diseases which can occur due to obesity are becoming increasingly prevalent.
Professor Cappuccio explains that sleep deprivation may lead to obesity through increased appetite as a result of hormonal changes. If you do not sleep enough you produce Ghrelin, a hormone that stimulates appetite. Lack of sleep also results in your body producing less Leptin, a hormone that suppresses appetite.
Diet is an important factor in shaping the gut ecosystem. A diet of highly processed foods, for example, has been linked to a less diverse gut community in people. Gordon’s team demonstrated the complex interaction among food, microbes and body weight by feeding their humanized mice a specially prepared unhealthy chow that was high in fat and low in fruits, vegetables and fiber (as opposed to the usual high-fiber, low-fat mouse kibble). Given this “Western diet,” the mice with obese-type microbes proceeded to grow fat even when housed with lean cagemates. The unhealthy diet somehow prevented the virtuous bacteria from moving in and flourishing.
Science shows that genetics play a role in obesity. Genes can cause certain disorders which result in obesity. However, not all individuals who are predisposed to obesity become affected by obesity. Research is currently underway to determine which genes contribute most to obesity.
Orlistat can be taken up to three times a day, with each fat-containing meal. The drug may be taken during the meal or up to one hour after the meal. If the meal is missed or is very low in fat content, the medications should not be taken.
NIH Obesity Research Task Force and Strategic Plan. We continue to support this larger NIH task force, that is committed to capitalizing on scientific research discoveries to develop new prevention methods and treatments for overweight and obesity. Visit NIH Obesity Research, NHLBI Obesity Research and the Strategic Plan for NIH Obesity Research for more information.
Weight-loss trials with adults 65 years and older that include mechanisms are few. These studies demonstrate that volume of exercise (particularly resistance training) appears critical in attenuating the loss of bone and muscle, along with calcium and Vitamin D supplementation. Inflammatory molecules and pathways, bone active hormones, exercise, mechanical unloading, sclerostin, and diet composition (glycemic index) all appear to be mediators in the response to weight loss.
Drink plenty of water. Sometimes, thirst masks itself as hunger. As you get older, you may not be as quick to notice when you’re thirsty, Li says. She says you should get 64 ounces of water a day. You can drink it or get part of it from foods that are naturally rich in water, such as cucumbers and tomatoes. If you’re not sure if you’re getting enough water, check your urine: It should be pale yellow.
Severe obesity afflicts between 4% and 6% of all youth in the United States, and the prevalence is increasing. Despite the serious immediate and long-term cardiovascular, metabolic, and other health consequences of severe pediatric obesity, current treatments
Baseline investigations include laboratory studies and imaging. Recommended laboratory tests include complete blood count, basic metabolic panel, liver function tests, thyroid function tests, C-reactive protein levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, glucose measurement, lactate dehydrogenase measurement, and urinalysis.1 Chest radiography and fecal occult blood testing should also be performed. Abdominal ultrasonography may be considered.1
Although cyproheptadine has been studied in patients with cancer and cachexia,38 routine use in older adults with unintentional weight loss has not been studied. Dronabinol (Marinol) and human growth hormone have been studied in small, limited trials with mixed results for short-term, small weight gains. Dronabinol has been associated with significant adverse effects, particularly central nervous system toxicity. Human growth hormone has been associated with increased mortality.17
People with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or higher are considered obese. The term “obesity” is used to describe the health condition of anyone significantly above his or her ideal healthy weight. Don’t be discouraged by the term. It simply means you are 20% or more above your ideal weight, and you are not alone.
15. Rimm EB, Stampfer MJ, Giovannucci E, Ascherio A, Spiegelman D, Colditz GA, Willett WC: Body size and fat distribution as predictors of coronary heart disease among middle-aged and older US men. Am J Epidemiol 1995; 141: 1117– 1127 [PubMed]
In a June 5 speech to the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Julie Gerberding reported that, in terms of controllable health factors, obesity is closing in on tobacco use as the leading cause of death in the United States, and needs to become a major priority for the U.S. healthcare system. Aggregated results from Gallup’s annual Health and Healthcare polls from 2000 to 2002*, reveal that obesity is a particularly serious problem among the “baby boomer” generation and those slightly older.
Jump up ^ Christakis NA, Fowler JH (2007). “The Spread of Obesity in a Large Social Network over 32 Years”. New England Journal of Medicine (Research Support). 357 (4): 370–79. doi:10.1056/NEJMsa066082. PMID 17652652.
18. Rydwik E, Lammes E, Frandin K, et al. Effects of a physical and nutritional intervention program for frail elderly people over age 75. A randomized controlled pilot treatment trial. Aging Clin Exp Res 2008;20:159–70 [PubMed]
This report issues a call for urgent action to combat the growing epidemic of obesity, which now affects developing and industrialized countries alike. Adopting a public health approach, the report responds to both the enormity of health problems associated with
Jump up ^ Neovius K, Johansson K, Kark M, Neovius M (January 2009). “Obesity status and sick leave: a systematic review”. Obes Rev (Review). 10 (1): 17–27. doi:10.1111/j.1467-789X.2008.00521.x. PMID 18778315.
Health consequences fall into two broad categories: those attributable to the effects of increased fat mass (such as osteoarthritis, obstructive sleep apnea, social stigmatization) and those due to the increased number of fat cells (diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease).[2][49] Increases in body fat alter the body’s response to insulin, potentially leading to insulin resistance. Increased fat also creates a proinflammatory state,[50][51] and a prothrombotic state.[49][52]
Obesity is a medical condition in which excess body fat has accumulated to the extent that it may have a negative effect on health.[1] People are generally considered obese when their body mass index (BMI), a measurement obtained by dividing a person’s weight by the square of the person’s height, is over 30 kg/m2, with the range 25–30 kg/m2 defined as overweight.[1] Some East Asian countries use lower values.[8] Obesity increases the likelihood of various diseases and conditions, particularly cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea, certain types of cancer, osteoarthritis and depression.[2][3]
Being overweight obese affects more than just a person’s outward appearance. In fact, excess weight and obesity can lead to many serious health risks, gradually destroying one’s quality of life. According to the National Institutes of Health, if obesity remains untreated, it can cause numerous serious, and even life-threatening, health problems:
The report notes that the number of Americans ages 65 and older is on course to more than double from 46 million today to over 98 million by 2060, while the 65-and-older age group’s share of the total population will rise to nearly 24 percent from 15 percent.
Physical inactivity, in turn, has rapid profound effects on skeletal muscle metabolism. Unlike the common association of obesity with increased lean body mass and muscle volume in young adults, obese older individuals often develop sarcopenia, reflected by reduction in lean body mass. Impaired mobility in older obese individuals is therefore hardly surprising. A recent study of 2,982 subjects, aged 70–79 years, followed up for 6.5 years, revealed that high adiposity increased the risk of new-onset mobility limitation by 40–50% (33). A cross-sectional study of 92 monozygotic and 104 dizygotic community-living pairs of twin sisters (aged 63–76 years) reared together found an inverse association between adiposity and mobility that was mostly due to the effect of shared genes (34). Larger waist circumference was a powerful predictor of new-onset disability 2 years later, associated with a 2.17-fold increase in the adjusted risk of mobility disability and a 4.77-fold higher adjusted risk of agility disability for men in the highest quintile compared with those in the lowest quintile (35).
Food that is nutrient dense – meaning food that contains a large amount of micronutrients like vitamins and minerals – are an integral part of any senior nutrition plan. With the aging process, it becomes more difficult for elderly adults to absorb and digest nutrients from the food they eat, and so choose foods that provide a variety of nutrients is vital. Examples of nutrient dense foods include sliced fruits and cooked vegetables, dairy products, and fish, chicken, and other lean proteins that are easy to chew and swallow. Sometimes, softer foods such as pudding, yogurt, or applesauce are helpful for increasing senior nutrition, and filling in calorie gaps in older adults.
Learning about your condition. Education about obesity can help you learn more about why you became obese and what you can do about it. You may feel more empowered to take control and stick to your treatment plan. Read reputable self-help books and consider talking about them with your doctor or therapist.
It is important to understand what “healthy weight” means. Healthy weight is defined as a body mass index (BMI) equal to or greater than 19 and less than 25 among all people 20 years of age or over. Generally, obesity is defined as a body mass index (BMI) equal to or greater than 30, which approximates 30 pounds of excess weight.
Jump up ^ Imaz I, Martínez-Cervell C, García-Alvarez EE, Sendra-Gutiérrez JM, González-Enríquez J (July 2008). “Safety and effectiveness of the intragastric balloon for obesity. A meta-analysis”. Obes Surg. 18 (7): 841–46. doi:10.1007/s11695-007-9331-8. PMID 18459025.

One Reply to ““obesity not a disease |obesity epidemic stats””

  1. The first step in addressing skin problems is to conduct a skin assessment of obese patients. The specificity and degree of skin problems will determine the intervention. Nurses are advised to initiate measures to decrease friction as soon as possible after hospital admission. Additionally, in older women, urinary incontinence from a large, heavy abdomen causing the valve on the bladder to weaken may result in the leaking of urine when coughing or sneezing. Nurses should educate patients about keeping the area dry so as to prevent skin problems. Strategies to keep the area dry include wearing absorption pads in their underwear and changing underwear as soon as possible when leakage occurs.
    The following medications are available in the United States by prescription. If you have been unsuccessful losing weight through diet and exercise, ask your doctor about these medications. For more information about these drugs, see Medication in the Treatment of Obesity. These are not a substitute for dietary management. Over the long term, successful long-term weight loss requires changes in overall eating patterns.

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