“obesity kills more than smoking _obesity in the usa 2017”

Any intentional weight-loss results not only in the loss of fat, but also muscle. This is especially relevant in the elderly as they have less muscle and more fat as a result of normal aging and often deconditioning. Nevertheless, there seems to be a consensus that a moderate weight-loss of 5-10 percent results in significant health benefits. Moreover, some studies show that even a weight loss of 3 percent in older adults significantly improves inflammation, blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar.
Liposuction is a surgical procedure that removes excess fat that is difficult to get rid of with diet and exercise. Liposuction does not prevent weight regain. Liposuction has a good safety record; risks of the procedure include infection and skin discoloration.
” It is well known that being overweight or being clinically obese can have an adverse impact on a woman’s fertility. … Another study, which was published at the end of 2008, agreed that male obesity and infertility were linked.” FertilityExpert.co.uk (Ref. http://bit.ly/zKSySZ).
Mind-body therapies — such as acupuncture, mindfulness meditation and yoga — may complement other obesity treatments. However, these therapies generally haven’t been well-studied in the treatment of weight loss. Talk to your doctor if you’re interested in adding a mind-body therapy to your treatment.
Cardiovascular disease, thromboembolism, cholecystitis, cholelithiasis, cholorectal cancer, abnormal GI transit, poor wound healing, atelectasis, hepatic steatosis and fibrosis, increased risk of vision loss. 
“At the same age, Gen X males have nearly double the prevalence of obesity: 18.3% compared with 9.4% for boomers. There is a smaller but still significant difference in females, with 12.7% of Gen X women being obese in 2008 and 10.4% of boomer females obese in 1989.
High-tech anti-obesity food engineering is just warming up. Oxford’s Charles Spence notes that in addition to flavors and textures, companies are investigating ways to exploit a stream of insights that have been coming out of scholarly research about the neuroscience of eating. He notes, for example, that candy companies may be able to slip healthier ingredients into candy bars without anyone noticing, simply by loading these ingredients into the middle of the bar and leaving most of the fat and sugar at the ends of the bar. “We tend to make up our minds about how something tastes from the first and last bites, and don’t care as much what happens in between,” he explains. Some other potentially useful gimmicks he points out: adding weight to food packaging such as yogurt containers, which convinces eaters that the contents are rich with calories, even when they’re not; using chewy textures that force consumers to spend more time between bites, giving the brain a chance to register satiety; and using colors, smells, sounds, and packaging information to create the belief that foods are fatty and sweet even when they are not. Spence found, for example, that wine is perceived as 50 percent sweeter when consumed under a red light.
Many poor Chileans do their food shopping at small mom-and-pop stores that sell mostly processed and packaged food and little fresh produce. Above, a store in the El Bosque neighborhood of Santiago. Credit Victor Ruiz Caballero for The New York Times
The points in this article clearly show that in the elderly population, weight classification may not always be accurate, which is one of the difficulties encountered in older adults. This is the first hurdle encountered when trying to evaluate and treat this disease in the elderly.
One of the most serious health risks of obesity is heart disease. In the United States, disease is a leading cause of death and disability for adult men and women. Excess weight is directly linked to heart disease: the higher the BMI, the higher the blood pressure, LDL “bad” cholesterol levels, and triglycerides (blood fats). All of these are key risk factors for coronary artery disease (a waxy plaque buildup in the arteries), angina (chest pain caused by decreased oxygen to the heart), heart attack, and congestive heart failure (inadequate heart function).
Studies of the effect of obesity on specific health outcomes such as diabetes or depression provide only a glimpse of the full impact of obesity on health and well-being. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) integrates the effect of obesity (or any other condition) across physical, psychological, and social functioning. Although HRQoL is a relatively young field of research, a number of studies have evaluated the overall impact of obesity on HRQoL. Among 31 studies in adults, the majority demonstrated that obesity was significantly associated with reduced HRQoL, compared with normal weight. (19) Researchers found a similar association among five HRQoL studies in children and adolescents.
Following a sensible diet can help prevent excess weight gain. But it’s also important to note that older adults occasionally have naturally occurring loss of taste or difficulty chewing that can make adhering to certain dietary recommendations challenging.
Evaluation of risks for heart disease in school children. The multigenerational Muscatine Heart Study followed children from 1970 to 1991 to study school-aged children for heart disease risk factors and to follow them throughout childhood into adulthood. The study continues to evaluate heart disease risk factors in the children of the initial study participants. Visit Muscatine Heart Study for more information about the results of this study.
Strokes: Being overweight or obese can lead to a buildup of plaque in your arteries. This causes blood clots to form, which can eventually reach the blood stream and then vital organs such as the brain or the heart, blocking blood flow and producing a stroke.

One Reply to ““obesity kills more than smoking _obesity in the usa 2017””

  1. The good news is that losing a small amount of weight can reduce your chances of developing heart disease or a stroke. Losing 5%-10% of your weight is proven to lower your chance of developing heart disease.
    About 80 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese.5 It isn’t clear why people who are overweight are more likely to develop this disease. It may be that being overweight causes cells to change, making them resistant to the hormone insulin. Insulin carries sugar from blood to the cells, where it is used for energy. When a person is insulin resistant, blood sugar cannot be taken up by the cells, resulting in high blood sugar. In addition, the cells that produce insulin must work extra hard to try to keep blood sugar normal. This may cause these cells to gradually fail.

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