“obesity in china _obesity rate in america by state”

“In older, obese people, it may be more important to improve physical function and quality of life, rather than to reverse or treat risk factors for cardiovascular disease,” says Villareal, now chief of geriatrics at the New Mexico Veterans Affairs Health Care System and professor of medicine at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine, both in Albuquerque. “Combining exercise and weight loss isn’t designed so much to extend their life expectancy as it is to improve their quality of life during their remaining years and to help seniors avoid being admitted to a nursing home.”
Just wanted to say thank you for your ebook of exercises for seniors. Lots of free things offered on the web are worthless. Your ebook has inspired me and helped me to begin an exercise program that I’ve been able to stick with. Thank you for making this resource available.”
Credentials: Diets which are created or endorsed by medical professionals are more likely to provide good advice. This does not mean any diet endorsed by a professional is good but it does have a better chance of being healthy.
Ancient Greek medicine recognizes obesity as a medical disorder, and records that the Ancient Egyptians saw it in the same way.[182] Hippocrates wrote that “Corpulence is not only a disease itself, but the harbinger of others”.[2] The Indian surgeon Sushruta (6th century BCE) related obesity to diabetes and heart disorders.[191] He recommended physical work to help cure it and its side effects.[191] For most of human history mankind struggled with food scarcity.[192] Obesity has thus historically been viewed as a sign of wealth and prosperity. It was common among high officials in Europe in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance[190] as well as in Ancient East Asian civilizations.[193] In the 17th century, English medical author Tobias Venner is credited with being one of the first to refer to the term as a societal disease in a published English language book.[182][194]
First of all, he needs to be told bluntly that wife, son and daughter are not personal servants of any healthy man. Illness is a different case. He be told to attend to all the work himself, if he does not consider his overweight as problem, and he considers himself as healthy. I suggest all of you withdraw for about half a day, watch from a distance and let him feel the pinch. His thinking needs to be shaken first of all.
Follow a healthy eating plan. Focus on low-calorie, nutrient-dense foods, such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Avoid saturated fat and limit sweets and alcohol. Eat three regular meals a day with limited snacking. You can still enjoy small amounts of high-fat, high-calorie foods as an infrequent treat. Just be sure to choose foods that promote a healthy weight and good health most of the time.
Health consequences fall into two broad categories: those attributable to the effects of increased fat mass (such as osteoarthritis, obstructive sleep apnea, social stigmatization) and those due to the increased number of fat cells (diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease).[2][49] Increases in body fat alter the body’s response to insulin, potentially leading to insulin resistance. Increased fat also creates a proinflammatory state,[50][51] and a prothrombotic state.[49][52]
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A rigorous inclusion criterion as described above was employed. Only randomized controlled trials with a minimum weight loss intervention of three months, and body composition measured by DXA, MRI, CT, or hydrostatic weighing were included. Studies which targeted specific chronic diseases or conditions (e.g. diabetes mellitus, osteoarthritis), were excluded.
An important determinant of body-fat mass is the relationship between energy intake and expenditure. Obesity occurs when a person consumes more calories than she/he burns. We need calories to sustain life and have the energy be active; yet to maintain a desirable weight, we need to balance the amount of  energy we ingest in the form of food with the energy we expend (National Institutes of Health [NIH]), 2006). Weight gain occurs when the balance is tipped and we take in more calories than we burn. Most studies indicate that how much we eat does not decline with advancing age (Gary, Hunt, VanderJagt, & Vellas, 1992). Therefore it is likely that a decrease in energy expenditure, particularly in the 50- to 65-year-old age group, contributes to the increase in body fat as we age. In those 65 years of age and older, hormonal changes that occur during aging may cause the accumulation of fat. Aging is associated with a decrease in growth hormone secretions, reduced responsiveness to thyroid hormone, decline in serum testosterone, and resistance to leptin (Corpas, Harman, & Blackman, 1993). Resistance to leptin could cause a decreased ability to regulate appetite downward (Villareal et al., 2005). Genetic, environmental and social, as well as several other factors can all contribute to obesity. These factors will be discussed below.
Children adopt the habits of their parents. A child who has overweight parents who eat high-calorie foods and are inactive will likely become overweight too. However, if the family adopts healthy food and physical activity habits, the child’s chance of being overweight or obese is reduced.
Obesity is from the Latin obesitas, which means “stout, fat, or plump”. Ēsus is the past participle of edere (to eat), with ob (over) added to it.[188] The Oxford English Dictionary documents its first usage in 1611 by Randle Cotgrave.[189]
Physical inactivity. Sedentary people burn fewer calories than people who are active. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) showed that physical inactivity was strongly correlated with weight gain in both sexes.
If current trends continue, Australia’s Generation X will overtake Baby Boomers for poor health, including rates of obesity and diabetes, which could have huge implications for healthcare and the workforce. Researchers compared the health status of Baby Boomers (born from 1946-1965) and Generation X (1966-1980) at the same age range of 25-44 years and found that Generation X had significantly poorer levels of self-rated health, and higher levels of obesity and diabetes compared with Boomers, with no real difference in physical activity between the two groups.
44. Bacon CG, Mittleman MA, Kawachi I, Giovannucci E, Glasser DB, Rimm EB: Sexual function in men older than 50 years of age: results from the health professionals follow-up study. Ann Intern Med 2003; 139: 161– 168 [PubMed]
Obesity is a chronic condition. Too often it is viewed as a temporary problem that can be treated for a few months with a strenuous diet. However, as most overweight people know, weight control must be considered a lifelong effort. To be safe and effective, any weight-loss program must address the long-term approach or else the program is largely a waste of time, money, and energy.
Asthma and obstructive sleep apnea are two common respiratory diseases that have been linked with obesity. In a meta-analysis of seven prospective studies that included 333,000 subjects, obesity increased the risk of developing asthma in both men and women by 50 percent. (33) Obesity is also a major contributor to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which is estimated to affect approximately one in five adults; one in 15 adults has moderate or severe obstructive sleep apnea. This condition is associated with daytime sleepiness, accidents, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and premature mortality. Between 50 percent and 75 percent of individuals with OSA are obese. (32) Clinical trials suggest that modest weight loss can be helpful when treating sleep apnea. (34, 35)
OK..grossly unfair to blame the Boomers for the rise in Obesity and the cost..as a nation we have been going down this road now for nearly 20 years. What has the government done? nothing….what has big food done?..not much unless people refuse to buy their crap. To blame the rising med costs just on Obesity is also a simplistic view. The American diet is crap..yes.Big Food is producing nasty foods with ingredients banned in most civilized countries…add GMO’s and we have yet another health care nightmare on the horizon…but Big Pharma is also getting more and more of us on their nasty drugs which is also causing health care problems. Obesity is the “new normal”…get over it…unless we have a proper national strategy to combat this..it is just going to get worse…and yes..I am a Boomer…but not part of the 72% of the fat / obese crowd.
A Senior Workout should start slowly with exercises that match your aging parents recent activity levels. Those moderately active can begin with relatively moderate-intensity aerobic activity. They should avoid vigorous intensity activities, such as shoveling snow or running. adults with a low level of fitness can begin with light senior exercises.

One Reply to ““obesity in china _obesity rate in america by state””

  1. One of the most serious health risks of obesity is cancer. Overweight women have increased risk of developing cancer of the uterus, gallbladder, cervix, ovary, breast, and colon. Overweight men are at higher risk for developing cancer of the colon, rectum, and prostate. One effective way to reduce the risks of these kinds of cancers is to lose weight through diet, exercise, a medical weight-loss program, or bariatric surgery.
    The prevalence of overweight and obesity is increasing globally and is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Our objective was to evaluate the impact of overweight and obesity on life expectancy and years lived with and without CVD in older adults.
    Make a plan for change. Work with your doctor to create a plan that will work for you. Ask family members and friends for help in keeping with your plan. Ask your doctor to recommend a dietitian to help you with meal planning.
    HASfit offers health, fitness and nutritional information and is designed for educational purposes only. You should not rely on this information as a substitute for, nor does it replace, professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. If you have any concerns or questions about your health, you should always consult with a physician or other health-care professional. Do not disregard, avoid or delay obtaining medical or health related advice from your health-care professional because of something you may have read on this site. The use of any information provided on this site is solely at your own risk.

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