“obesity in america compared to europe |exercise obese seniors”

A retrospective chart review of 96 residents in six intermediate care facilities in the United States found an association between anorexia and poor weight status and confusion in 42 residents.8 A prospective six-month study involving 309 residents of an intermediate nursing home in suburban midwestern United States found the primary reasons for weight changes to be acute illness, dementia and changes in the mucous membranes of the mouth and gums.9
Slow and steady changes to your dog’s diet are more likely to result in long-term success. Reducing the amount of food your dog eats per day drastically might slow your dog’s metabolism, making it more difficult to lose weight.
This “uptick in disability is something important to keep an eye on,” because of the impact it may have on America’s families (who provide most of the care for individuals with disabilities) and on public health care programs, Freedman said.
Caring.com is a leading online destination for caregivers seeking information and support as they care for aging parents, spouses, and other loved ones. We offer thousands of original articles, helpful tools, advice from more than 50 leading experts, a community of caregivers, and a comprehensive directory of caregiving services.
Metabolic syndrome – The National Cholesterol Education Program has identified metabolic syndrome as a complex risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Metabolic syndrome consists of six major components: abdominal obesity, elevated blood cholesterol, elevated blood pressure, insulin resistance with or without glucose intolerance, elevation of certain blood components that indicate inflammation, and elevation of certain clotting factors in the blood. In the US, approximately one-third of overweight or obese persons exhibit metabolic syndrome.
Being overweight or obese isn’t just a cosmetic issue. Both conditions put your health at risk and can contribute a number of diseases, including diabetes and cancer. That risk only increases in individuals who have a family history of health problems, have a sedentary lifestyle, smoke, or have an unhealthy diet.
Type 2 diabetes is among the most serious health risks of obesity. Type 2 diabetes, the most common form, means that a person’s body does not use insulin properly. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the risk of developing type 2 diabetes is doubled in overweight or obese people. Left untreated, it can lead to premature death, heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, kidney disease, stroke, and blindness. You can reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by losing weight and increasing your physical activity.
Schmitz KH, Neuhouser ML, Agurs-Collins T, et al. Impact of obesity on cancer survivorship and the potential relevance of race and ethnicity. Journal of the National Cancer Institute 2013; 105(18):1344-1354.
The UT MIST Center for Bariatric and Metabolic Surgery and UT COMMP specializes in weight-loss surgery and medical weight loss programs. Our board-certified surgeons perform traditional and minimally invasive robotic, laparoscopic, and endoscopic surgery, including gastric bypass, gastric sleeve surgery, LAP-BAND® surgery, duodenal switch, reflux surgery, hernia repair, and more. We see patients at the following UT MIST/UT COMMP locations: Houston, Bayshore, Bellaire, Katy, Missouri City, and Sugar Land, Texas.
Cardiovascular disease. Coronary heart disease is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality in older patients who are 65 years and older. It remains a leading cause of mortality in the US with 84% of persons 65 years or older dying from this disease (Hanna & Wenger, 2005).
In the second paper, all CVD risk factors significantly improved in the diet and exercise group (Villareal 2006b). Specific mechanisms were not proposed, but the discussion focused on medical care costs related to metabolic coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors that were ameliorated by the intervention (Table 1). In the third paper (Villareal 2008), bone turnover was measured by type 1 collagen C-terminal telopeptide (CTX), osteocalcin, and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase. There was a marked increase in serum CTX (~100-fold) and osteocalcin (~60-fold) concentrations in response to weight loss indicating that bone resorption and formation, respectively, were stimulated. Moreover, the increases in both CTX and osteocalcin concentrations correlated with decreases in hip bone mineral density (BMD), suggesting that weight-loss induced bone loss was due to increased bone turnover, with greater stimulation of bone resorption than bone formation. However, the clinical significance of the decrease in BMD was not clear as all participants had high baseline BMD Z-scores, and none had evidence of osteoporosis following weight loss. The investigators argued that BMD was not lost in the spine, which implies that the exercises were more effective in preserving BMD at this site. Exact mechanisms for loss of BMD with weight loss are not currently elucidated, but it was suggested that weight loss decreases the mechanical stress on the hip, without negatively impacting the spine or wrist. Weight loss was also associated with a 25% reduction in serum leptin that was highly correlated with decreased hip BMD. No such relationship was found between decreasing estradiol and changes in BMD. Leptin was discussed in the context of its inhibiting action on the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) ligand levels (Burguera 2001) and osteoblast differentiation (Cornish 2002). Levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), cortisol, and parathyroid hormone (PTH) did not change in response to weight loss, which suggests that these bone-active hormones were not involved with the loss of BMD in the hip. Vitamin D supplementation during the trial did not reach optimal serum concentrations and whether higher dose Vitamin D supplementation could have slowed bone loss, was raised by the investigators. It was also noted that bone quality was not measured and could have been positively impacted by the exercise training intervention.
A slew of start-ups are trying to find ways of producing fresh, local, unprocessed meals quickly and at lower cost. But could this food eventually be sold as cheaply, conveniently, and ubiquitously as today’s junky fast food? Not even according to Bittman, who explored the question in a recent New York Times Magazine article. Even if wholesome food caught on with the public at large, including the obese population, and even if poor and working-class people were willing to pay a premium for it, how long would it take to scale up from a handful of shops to the tens of thousands required to begin making a dent in the obesity crisis? How long would it take to create the thousands of local farms we’d need in order to provide these shops with fresh, unprocessed ingredients, even in cities?
The World Health Organization (2005) has noted that life-threatening illnesses related to obesity include cardiovascular disease; conditions associated with insulin resistance, such as type 2 diabetes; certain types of cancers, especially hormonally related and large-bowel cancer; and gallbladder disease. The next few sections will discuss these illnesses.

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