“nutrition and obesity in the us +obesity epidemic in america”

Lee JS, Visser M, Tylavsky FA, Kritchevshy SB, Schwartz AV, Sahyoun N, Harris TB, Newman AB. Weight loss and regain and effects on body composition: the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2010;65:78–83. [PMC free article] [PubMed]
I am 61 years old female. Gym with light weight reps. Watch my intake. Post menopause with complete hysterectomy. 5 ft 2 inches with 200 lb weight. All labs are normal. Taking only daily vitamins. Continue to gain weight. Doctor consulted with continue with light weights and cardio.
My husband and I went there and stayed for 4 weeks. We are both in our early 70’s and were not what I would consider to be in “working out condition”. The owners were so kind and sweet and they went out of their way to modify the program for us and to set aside time and activities outside of their standard clients.
Researchers at the University of Adelaide have confirmed that if current trends continue, Australia’s Generation X will overtake Baby Boomers for poor health, including rates of obesity and diabetes, which could have huge implications for healthcare and the workforce.
Today 72 percent of boomer men and 67 percent of boomer women are overweight or obese. By 2030, this generation will experience almost double the incident of having all three chronic conditions of hypertension, heart disease and diabetes. These three chronic health conditions are tied to this generation’s weight gain. The boomer generation is in a weight crisis that is about to go over the health care cliff.
Older women in good health need at least 150 minutes of physical activity weekly, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Another option is one 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity weekly.
Nov. 4, 2013 — Thanks to a wave of aging baby boomers, epidemics of diabetes and obesity, and the Affordable Care Act, which aims to bring health care coverage to millions more Americans, the United States faces a … read more
Apr. 1, 2016 — Lifestyle changes that include healthier diet and routine physical exercise help older overweight and obese adults with Type 2 diabetes improve glucose control, body composition, physical function … read more
Currently, 7% of the world’s population is over 65 years of age. This figure is projected to rise to 12% by 2030. In the US it is projected to rise from 12% (35 million) to 20% (71 million) by 2030 (Yan et al., 2004). These substantial increases among older adults suggest that obesity among older Americans is likely to become a greater problem in the future (Center on an Aging Society, 2003). By 2000, the prevalence of obesity in people 50 to 69 years of age had increased to 22.9%, and for those above 70 years of age to 15%, representing increases of 56% and 36% respectively, since 1991 (Villareal et al., 2005).
Vagal blockade involves surgically implanting a device that stimulates the abdominal vagal nerve, thereby sending signals to the brain that say you are full, which can reduce hunger. Short-term studies have shown modest weight loss (about 18 pounds). No long-term studies have been done yet, and some patients develop pain at the implantation site as well as nausea, vomiting, heartburn, and burping.
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Frimel TN, Sinacore DR, Villareal DT. Exercise attenuates the weight- loss-induced reduction in muscle mass in frail obese older adults. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2008;40:1213–1219. [PMC free article] [PubMed]
If you haven’t been active for most of your life, trying to start an exercise program in your senior years may seem overwhelming. But Moreno suggests that you focus on what you can do, not on what you can’t do. “Start simple,” he says. “Walking, for example, gives you every exercise benefit that you need.”
“Generation X appears to have developed both obesity and diabetes much sooner when compared with Baby Boomers, which is a major concern on a number of fronts,” says co-author and University of Adelaide PhD student Rhiannon Pilkington, who is a member of the University’s Population Research & Outcome Studies group, School of Medicine.
Talking to your health care provider openly and honestly about your weight concerns is one of the best things you can do for your health. In some cases, you may be referred to an obesity specialist — if one is available in your area. You may also be referred to a behavioral counselor, dietitian or nutrition specialist.
Participating in a non-clinical program or commercially operated program is another form of treatment for obesity. Some programs may be commercially operated, such as a privately owned weight-loss chain. Counselors, books, Web sites or support groups are all ways you can be involved in a non-clinical weight-loss program.
Preventing obesity, or losing weight if you are obese, is about having awareness of the daily choices you make. Understanding the causes and consequences of obesity is the first step towards a healthy lifestyle. The next step is up to you.
In summary, the evidence confirmed that weight loss of about 10% is achievable through caloric restriction and exercise in sedentary, frail, obese adults aged 65 years and older. However, there was loss of BMD and lean body mass, which can be attenuated, but not stopped, by the addition of exercise during the active weight loss period. The loss of skeletal muscle and bone is a common outcome in weight loss trials (Bales 2008) and one of the primary reasons that recommending weight loss for older adults remains controversial. However, the clinical relevance of this adverse effect remains to be determined due to high baseline BMD and improvements in physical function and metabolic parameters with weight loss. Although the notion that obesity is osteoprotective is now challenged by newer findings that excess adiposity could be detrimental to bone (Nielson 2011), it is possible that dietary-induced caloric restriction through its effect in reducing inflammation may preserve bone quality despite the reduction in BMD (Villareal 2011b). Moreover, it is unclear whether the beneficial effects of weight loss therapy on physical function lower the overall risk of falls and fractures, despite the low BMD.
With the arrival of televisions, computers, video games, remote controls, washing machines, dish washers and other modern convenience devices, people are commonly are leading a much more sedentary lifestyle compared to their parents and grandparents.
The data showed that Sacramento boomers are more likely to be overweight than Californians living in every other part of the state except the San Joaquin Valley, where nearly four of every five boomers were overweight.
“Apple” shape. People whose weight is concentrated around their stomachs may be at greater risk developing heart disease, diabetes, or cancer than people of the same weight who are “pear-shaped” (they carry their weight in their hips and buttocks).
For people with obesity, weight loss based solely on lifestyle changes can be very difficult to achieve and even more challenging to maintain. Supporting strategies, such as obesity medications, can be important tools for effectively treating obesity in some individuals. Given the complex nature of the disease, no single drug is likely to fix the epidemic. Additional research and development efforts are needed for obesity treatments – as there are more than 100 drugs available for related diseases, like hypertension, but only 6 medications approved for the long-term treatment of obesity.
Obesity prevention programs have been found to reduce the cost of treating obesity-related disease. However, the longer people live, the more medical costs they incur. Researchers, therefore, conclude that reducing obesity may improve the public’s health, but it is unlikely to reduce overall health spending.[207]
The percentage of overweight and obese Americans 65 and older has grown: 72% of older men and 67% of older women are now overweight or obese. Baby boomers started reaching age 65 in 2011, and the report, which was funded by the National Institutes of Health, also shows many of these older Americans are not financially prepared to pay for long-term care in nursing homes. That’s concerning, since America’s aging population, which is now around 40 million, is estimated to double by 2050.
“Obesity wreaks so much havoc on one’s long-term survival capacity that obese adults either don’t live long enough to be included in the survey or they are institutionalized and therefore also excluded. In that sense, the survey data doesn’t capture the population we’re most interested in,” says Masters, a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar at Columbia’s Mailman School and the study’s first author.
Jump up ^ Peeters A, Barendregt JJ, Willekens F, Mackenbach JP, Al Mamun A, Bonneux L (January 2003). “Obesity in adulthood and its consequences for life expectancy: A life-table analysis”. Annals of Internal Medicine. 138 (1): 24–32. doi:10.7326/0003-4819-138-1-200301070-00008. PMID 12513041.
Excessive body weight is associated with various diseases and conditions, particularly cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus type 2, obstructive sleep apnea, certain types of cancer, osteoarthritis[2] and asthma.[2][30] As a result, obesity has been found to reduce life expectancy.[2]
That brings us to the crucial question: Just how much healthier could fast-food joints and processed-food companies make their best-selling products without turning off customers? I put that question to a team of McDonald’s executives, scientists, and chefs who are involved in shaping the company’s future menus, during a February visit to McDonald’s surprisingly bucolic campus west of Chicago. By way of a partial answer, the team served me up a preview tasting of two major new menu items that had been under development in their test kitchens and high-tech sensory-testing labs for the past year, and which were rolled out to the public in April. The first was the Egg White Delight McMuffin ($2.65), a lower-calorie, less fatty version of the Egg McMuffin, with some of the refined flour in the original recipe replaced by whole-grain flour. The other was one of three new Premium McWraps ($3.99), crammed with grilled chicken and spring mix, and given a light coating of ranch dressing amped up with rice vinegar. Both items tasted pretty good (as do the versions in stores, I’ve since confirmed, though some outlets go too heavy on the dressing). And they were both lower in fat, sugar, and calories than not only many McDonald’s staples, but also much of the food served in wholesome restaurants or touted in wholesome cookbooks.
According to an article in Annals of Pharmacotherapy, some medications cause weight gain. “Clinically significant weight gain is associated with some commonly prescribed medicines. There is wide interindividual variation in response and variation of the degree of weight gain within drug classes. Where possible, alternative therapy should be selected, especially for individuals predisposed to overweight and obesity.” (The Annals of Pharmacotherapy: Vol. 39, No. 12, pp. 2046-2054. DOI 10.1345/aph.1G33)
Kitahara CM, Flint AJ, Berrington de Gonzalez A, et al. Association between class III obesity (BMI of 40-59 kg/m2) and mortality: a pooled analysis of 20 prospective studies. PLoS Medicine 2014; 11(7):e1001673.
It’s been proven that obesity puts severe strain on your dog’s body and will contribute to bone and joint problems like arthritis and hip dysplasia. Senior obese dogs are also more prone to skin and urinary tract problems. There are quite a few other diseases that are caused by being overweight, thus it’s important for you to address this problem right away and keep an eye on your dog’s weight to prevent other illnesses.
If the most-influential voices in our food culture today get their way, we will achieve a genuine food revolution. Too bad it would be one tailored to the dubious health fantasies of a small, elite minority. And too bad it would largely exclude the obese masses, who would continue to sicken and die early. Despite the best efforts of a small army of wholesome-food heroes, there is no reasonable scenario under which these foods could become cheap and plentiful enough to serve as the core diet for most of the obese population—even in the unlikely case that your typical junk-food eater would be willing and able to break lifelong habits to embrace kale and yellow beets. And many of the dishes glorified by the wholesome-food movement are, in any case, as caloric and obesogenic as anything served in a Burger King.

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