“icd 10 for obesity counseling obesity prevalence in us”

The good news is that even modest weight loss can improve or prevent the health problems associated with obesity. Dietary changes, increased physical activity and behavior changes can help you lose weight. Prescription medications and weight-loss surgery are additional options for treating obesity.
Most people have tried numerous diets without success. The dieting results in the dreaded “yo-yo” syndrome. The “yo-yo” syndrome begins when you start a diet, lose some weight, go off the diet and then gain back all of the weight you lost, sometimes even more weight. Over time it becomes more and more difficult to lose even a few pounds, despite severe caloric reduction.
Shah et al. (2009) recruited 18 obese older adults. The participants were sedentary (≤ 2 exercise sessions per week), and were weight and medication stable. The intervention energy deficit was 500–1000 kcal per day, with three exercise sessions per week progressing to moderate intensity (~85% of peak heart rate). Intra hepatic fat (IHF) content was measured by Occipital Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1H-MRS). There was a 50% reduction in IHF with 9% weight loss that was consistent with findings in younger subjects (Petersen 2005; Sato 2007). The investigators reported that the liver appeared to readily mobilize intrahepatic triglycerides in response to negative energy balance. However, exercise training plus diet did not have an additive effect, consistent with previous reports (Tamura 2005; Larson-Meyer 2006).
A diet high in simple carbohydrates. The role of carbohydrates in weight gain is not clear. Carbohydrates increase blood glucose levels, which in turn stimulate insulin release by the pancreas, and insulin promotes the growth of fat tissue and can cause weight gain. Some scientists believe that simple carbohydrates (sugars, fructose, desserts, soft drinks, beer, wine, etc.) contribute to weight gain because they are more rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream than complex carbohydrates (pasta, brown rice, grains, vegetables, raw fruits, etc.) and cause a more pronounced insulin release after meals than complex carbohydrates. This higher insulin release, some scientists believe, contributes to weight gain.
At what stage of life a person becomes obese can affect his or her ability to lose weight. In childhood, excess calories are converted into new fat cells (hyperplastic obesity), while excess calories consumed in adulthood only serve to expand existing fat cells (hypertrophic obesity). Since dieting and exercise can only reduce the size of fat cells, not eliminate them, persons who were obese as children can have great difficulty losing weight, since they may have up to five times as many fat cells as someone who became overweight as an adult.
Strokes: Being overweight or obese can lead to a buildup of plaque in your arteries. This causes blood clots to form, which can eventually reach the blood stream and then vital organs such as the brain or the heart, blocking blood flow and producing a stroke.
Slow and steady changes to your dog’s diet are more likely to result in long-term success. Reducing the amount of food your dog eats per day too drastically might slow your dog’s metabolism, making it more difficult to lose weight.
The program should provide long-term strategies for dealing with weight problems that may come up in the future. These strategies might include things like establishing a support system and establishing a physical activity routine.
For most individuals who are mildly obese, these behavior modifications entail life-style changes they can make independently while being supervised by a family physician. Other mildly obese persons may seek the help of a commercial weight-loss program (e.g., Weight Watchers). The effectiveness of these programs is difficult to assess, since programs vary widely, drop-out rates are high, and few employ members of the medical community. However, programs that emphasize realistic goals, gradual progress, sensible eating, and exercise can be very helpful and are recommended by many doctors. Programs that promise instant weight loss or feature severely restricted diets are not effective and, in some cases, can be dangerous.
Jump up ^ Poirier P, Giles TD, Bray GA, Hong Y, Stern JS, Pi-Sunyer FX, Eckel RH (May 2006). “Obesity and cardiovascular disease: pathophysiology, evaluation, and effect of weight loss”. Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol. (Review). 26 (5): 968–76. doi:10.1161/01.ATV.0000216787.85457.f3. PMID 16627822.
If you have too much body fat, you are obese, just like over 70 million other Americans. It happens because you eat more calories than you use, and your body converts the excess to fat. There are lots of reasons that this can happen. Our lifestyle may lack exercise, we are given portions that are too big and too caloric when we eat, and some of us are just more efficient genetically at converting food into fat.
For individuals who are severely obese, dietary changes and behavior modification may be accompanied by surgery to reduce or bypass portions of the stomach or small intestine. Although obesity surgery is less risky as of 2003 because of recent innovations in equipment and surgical technique, it is still performed only on patients for whom other strategies have failed and whose obesity seriously threatens their health. Other surgical procedures are not recommended, including liposuction, a purely cosmetic procedure in which a suction device is used to remove fat from beneath the skin, and jaw wiring, which can damage gums and teeth and cause painful muscle spasms.
It’s not exactly a scientific study, but we really shouldn’t need one to recognize that people aren’t going to change their ingrained, neurobiologically supercharged junk-eating habits just because someone dangles vegetables in front of them, farm-fresh or otherwise. Mark Bittman sees signs of victory in “the stories parents tell me of their kids booing as they drive by McDonald’s,” but it’s not hard to imagine which parents, which kids, and which neighborhoods those stories might involve. One study found that subsidizing the purchase of vegetables encouraged shoppers to buy more vegetables, but also more junk food with the money they saved; on balance, their diets did not improve. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently found that the aughts saw a significant drop in fruit intake, and no increase in vegetable consumption; Americans continue to fall far short of eating the recommended amounts of either. “Everyone’s mother and brother has been telling them to eat more fruit and vegetables forever, and the numbers are only getting worse,” says Steven Nickolas, who runs the Healthy Food Project in Scottsdale, Arizona. “We’re not going to solve this problem by telling people to eat unprocessed food.”
Cancer. Obesity is also linked to higher rates of certain types of cancer (NIH, 2006). Breast cancer in older women is increasingly being linked to obesity (Sweeney, Blair, Anderson, Lazovich, & Folsom, 2004). Twenty-five to 30% of several major cancers, including breast (postmenopausal), colon, kidney, and esophageal, have been linked to obesity and physical inactivity (Vainio & Bianchini, 2002). Men who are obese are more likely to develop cancer of the colon, rectum, or prostate, than men who are not obese. Cancer of the gallbladder, uterus, cervix, or ovaries are more common in women who are obese compared with women who are not obese (NIH, 2006). Management of obesity is needed to decrease the incidence of these cancers.
Jump up ^ Basen-Engquist, Karen; Chang, Maria (16 November 2010). “Obesity and Cancer Risk: Recent Review and Evidence”. Current Oncology Reports. 13 (1): 71–76. doi:10.1007/s11912-010-0139-7. PMC 3786180 . PMID 21080117.

One Reply to ““icd 10 for obesity counseling obesity prevalence in us””

  1. The next consideration is how do you actually lost the weight? Here we rely on the same tried and true method – eating less and exercising more to burn more calories. Unfortunately, this requires lifestyle changes. It takes a lot of patience, support and perseverance to make permanent changes.
    To start narrowing the differential diagnoses (see sidebar titled “Differential diagnoses for weight loss”), collect a complete history. Use open-ended questions to explore the owner’s knowledge of the cat’s diet, eating habits, and energy level: What changes have occurred regarding activity? What diet is being fed? How much, where, and how often is the cat being fed? What treats and supplements are given? How has the diet changed? How is the cat’s appetite?

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