“dr jason fung the obesity code |obesity adolescents”

Losing weight is difficult, and interventions that work in younger adults cannot be assumed to translate to older populations with co-morbidities, low muscle mass and frailty (Villareal 2004). The appropriate treatment approach for obesity remains highly contentious due to the lack of evidenced-based data demonstrating that long-term weight loss is net beneficial or harmful in this age group. There is evidence that successful weight loss is possible in adults 65 years and older (Villareal 2006a; Villareal 2006b; Villareal 2008; Frimel 2008; Lambert 2008; Shah 2009; Villareal 2011a; Armamento-Villareal 2012; Shah 2011; Kelly 2011). However, weight-loss trials have reported losses of lean body mass and bone mineral density, in addition to fat mass (Villareal 2006a; Villareal 2006b; Villareal 2008; Frimel 2008; Lambert 2008; Shah 2009; Villareal 2011a; Armamento-Villareal 2012; Shah 2011; Kelly 2011; Bales 2008). These negative outcomes discourage many geriatricians from advising weight loss to their obese older patients (Heiat 2001; Rossner 2001; Sorensen 2003; Villareal 2005; Zamboni 2005; Rolland 2006; Morley 2010), despite improvements in body composition, physical function, metabolic and cardiovascular parameters that accompany weight loss (Forsythe 2008; Anandacoomarasamy 2009; Cheung 2012; Erteck 2012). Given these positive functional and metabolic outcomes, it is somewhat surprising that advising weight loss in obese older adults is still shunned in the medical community (Houston 2009; Sommers 2011). Compounding the confusion surrounding risks versus benefits from intentional weight loss is the lack of human studies to elucidate the mechanisms associated with the loss of muscle and bone. Also lacking are trials with adequate follow-up to assess the behaviors associated with long-term maintenance of weight loss and health outcomes related to sustained weight loss.
The mechanism for excessive weight gain is clear—more calories are consumed than the body burns, and the excess calories are stored as fat (adipose) tissue. However, the exact cause is not as clear and likely arises from a complex combination of factors. Genetic factors significantly influence how the body regulates the appetite and the rate at which it turns food into energy (metabolic rate). Studies of adoptees confirm this relationship—the majority of adoptees followed a pattern of weight gain that more closely resembled that of their birth parents than their adoptive parents. A genetic predisposition to weight gain, however, does not automatically mean that a person will be obese. Eating habits and patterns of physical activity also play a significant role in the amount of weight a person gains. Recent studies have indicated that the amount of fat in a person’s diet may have a greater impact on weight than the number of calories it contains. Carbohydrates like cereals, breads, fruits, and vegetables and protein (fish, lean meat, turkey breast, skim milk) are converted to fuel almost as soon as they are consumed. Most fat calories are immediately stored in fat cells, which add to the body’s weight and girth as they expand and multiply. A sedentary lifestyle, particularly prevalent in affluent societies, such as in the United States, can contribute to weight gain. Psychological factors, such as depression and low self-esteem may, in some cases, also play a role in weight gain.
Three years ago, when Nicole Wilhelm, a public relations executive in Jacksonville, Florida, was in the throes of wedding planning, she visited her 68-year-old father in Lucerne Valley, California. It quickly became apparent that something was wrong, says Wilhelm.
Waist circumference is another widely used measurement to determine abdominal fat content. An excess of abdominal fat, when out of proportion to total body fat, is considered a predictor of risk factors related to obesity. Men with a waist measurement exceeding 40 inches are considered at risk. Women are at risk with a waist measurement of 35 inches or greater.
We need to learn more about the causes of obesity, and then we need to change the ways we treat it. When obesity is accepted as a chronic disease, it will be treated like other chronic diseases such as diabetes and high blood pressure. The treatment of obesity cannot be a short-term “fix” but has to be an ongoing lifelong process.
It is well known that obesity contributes to health problems such as diabetes and heart disease. In addition, obese individuals may suffer from hypertension, arthritis and other conditions that make movement difficult or painful. However, according to the Mayo Clinic, even modest increase in activity can help people lose weight, and yoga provides modified routines that can be a significant part of that process. According to a 2005 study published in the journal “Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine,” yoga practice resulted in weight loss most strongly in study subjects who were overweight.
Gastric bypass surgery. In gastric bypass (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass), the surgeon creates a small pouch at the top of your stomach. The small intestine is then cut a short distance below the main stomach and connected to the new pouch. Food and liquid flow directly from the pouch into this part of the intestine, bypassing most of your stomach.
There are many options for weight loss and as you’ll discover, not every option is appropriate every patient. The journey to weight loss is different for everyone based on your individual lifestyle and goals.
This study was a follow up of a one-year lifestyle intervention (Villareal 2011a). The participants remained in the community, with no contact by study personnel, until the 30-month follow-up point. The investigators recruited the first half of the participants who were randomized to the weight loss group (n=13) and diet plus exercise group (n=13) from this previously reported life-style intervention (Villareal 2011a). Of the potential participants available for recruitment, ten (38%) were lost to follow-up. The remaining sixteen participants recruited into the study were representative of the original cohort with regard to age, gender, and other demographic characteristics. Outcomes of interest in the follow-up study were changes in body weight and composition, physical function, quality of life, insulin sensitivity, BMD, and renal and liver function. Participants also completed the Block Brief 2000 Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) to quantify their average daily energy intake over the previous year. Participants were included if they completed at least three days of food records, submitted the FFQ, and had daily energy intakes of more than 500 kcal per day for women, and 800 kcal per day for men. At the 30-month follow-up compared to baseline, weight (101.5 ± 3.8 vs 94.5 ± 3.9 kg) and BMI (36.0 ± 1.7 vs 33.5 ± 1.7 kg/m2) remained significantly below baseline (all p<0.05). Fat free mass (56.7 ± 2.1 vs 56.9 ± 2.2 kg) and appendicular lean mass (24.1 ± 1.0 vs 24.1 ± 1.1kg) remained unchanged when compared to the 12-month point (end of trial) and the 30-month follow-up (all p>0.05). Improvements in the physical performance test (PPT 27 ± 0.7 vs 30.2 ± 0.6), insulin sensitivity (4.1 ± 0.8 vs 3.0 ± 0.6), and insulin area under the curve (12484 ± 2042 vs 9270 ± 1139 min.mg/dl) remained unchanged at 30 months compared to baseline (all p<0.05). Waist circumference and systolic blood pressure remained lower at 30 months compared to baseline (all p<0.05). Whole body and lumbar spine BMD did not change; however, total hip BMD progressively decreased from baseline to 30 months (0.985 ± .026 vs 0.941 ± .024 g/cm2; p<0.05). There were no adverse effects on liver or renal function. Thirteen participants met inclusion requirements for the dietary analysis. At baseline the average caloric intake was 2045 ± 178 kcal per day. At the 30-month follow-up, the FFQ estimated mean daily intake was 1427 ± 142 kcal per day. Overall, participants consumed an average of 619 ± 157 kcal per day less at 30 month follow-up compared to baseline (p<0.05). Taking your health history. Your doctor may review your weight history, weight-loss efforts, exercise habits, eating patterns, what other conditions you've had, medications, stress levels and other issues about your health. Your doctor may also review your family's health history to see if you may be predisposed to certain conditions. Sugar drinks are the largest source of added sugar in the diets of children and adolescents. Increasing consumption of these high caloric beverages that offer little or no nutrients is associated with the increasing rates of childhood obesity. Researchers interviewed over one thousand men and women who were born between 1946 and 1964.  According to their findings over a fourth (28%) said the worst thing about getting older are changes that occur in their physical ability.  Being physically independent and being able to pay for medical costs is a major concern.  Overweight and obesity may increase the risk of many health problems, including diabetes, heart disease, and certain cancers. If you are pregnant, excess weight may lead to short- and long-term health problems for you and your child. Jump up ^ Dannenberg AL, Burton DC, Jackson RJ (2004). "Economic and environmental costs of obesity: The impact on airlines". American journal of preventive medicine (Letter). 27 (3): 264. doi:10.1016/j.amepre.2004.06.004. PMID 15450642. For example, a 5-foot-7-inch person would be considered overweight, but not obese, at a weight between 160 and 190 pounds. Someone six feet tall who weighs between 185 and 220 pounds would also meet the BMI classification for overweight but not obese. Adapted with permission from The clinical and cost-effectiveness of medical nutrition therapies: evidence and estimates of potential medical savings from the use of selected nutritional intervention. June 1996. Summary report prepared for the Nutrition Screening Initiative, a project of the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Dietetic Association, and the National Council on Aging, Inc. This study will see if personalized feedback about worksite food purchases, daily calorie goals, healthy eating, and financial incentives for healthy food purchases can help employees at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) prevent weight gain, reduce cardiovascular risk factors, and make healthier long-term food choices. If successful, the approach could be used by people at other worksites and food retailers to help fight the obesity epidemic. To participate, you must be an MGH employee who is 21 years or older and uses the hospital cafeteria. Visit Promoting Employee Health Through the Worksite Food Environment (ChooseWell 365) for more information and to learn how to participate in the study. Jump up ^ Corona, G; Rastrelli, G; Filippi, S; Vignozzi, L; Mannucci, E; Maggi, M (2014). "Erectile dysfunction and central obesity: an Italian perspective". Asian Journal of Andrology. 16 (4): 581–91. doi:10.4103/1008-682X.126386. PMC 4104087 . PMID 24713832. “Obesity wreaks so much havoc on one’s long-term survival capacity that obese adults either don’t live long enough to be included in the survey or they are institutionalized and therefore also excluded. In that sense, the survey data doesn’t capture the population we’re most interested in,” says Masters, a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar at Columbia’s Mailman School and the study’s first author. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) being overweight or obese is largely preventable. To reach your ideal weight you must reach a balance of calories consumed and calories burned. According to WHO, in your diet you can: Deloitte has centered on two key areas where it can leverage its strengths as a business service provider to have a positive impact for the long term on the communities in which it operates: education and workforce development. Just as genetics plays a role in obesity, so does the environment. The environment includes the world around us; it influences access to healthy food and safe places to walk. What we eat, our level of physical activity, and our lifestyle behaviors are influenced by our environment. Our environment can prevent us from eating healthy foods and/or getting adequate exercise in a number of ways. Examples include the trend toward ‘eating out’ rather than preparing food in the home; high-fat, high-calorie foods in our workplace vending machines; neighborhoods that often lack sidewalks; and a deficit of readily accessible recreation areas. For starters, it's even more important than ever to actually follow the advice to talk to your doc before beginning any new exercise regimen. "Medical problems, such as heart disease and metabolic disease, become more common after age 60, so it becomes much more important to have a medical checkup before attempting a fat loss plan," says Huizenga. Then there's the fact that over the age of 60, your oxygen intake may be reduced by as much as one-third of what it was when you were 25, causing you to have a tougher time taking deep breaths when you're exercising at a moderate to high intensity, and making it crucial to ease in to a new plan. Finally, this is the decade when your hips, knees, and other key joints are more likely to develop arthritis, which means that your old go-to running or aerobics workouts may need to be swapped for swimming and/or gentle walking plans. To screen for overweight and obesity, doctors measure BMI using calculations that depend on whether you are a child or an adult. After reading the information below, talk to your doctor or your child’s doctor to determine if you or your child has a high or increasing BMI. Larson-Meyer DE, Heilbronn LK, Redman LM, Newcomer BR, Frisard MI, Anton S, Smith SR, Alfonso A, Ravussin E. Effect of calorie restriction with or without exercise on insulin sensitivity, beta-cell function, fat cell size, and ectopic lipid in overweight subjects. Diabetes Care. 2006;29:1337–1344. [PMC free article] [PubMed] Inflammation of the gallbladder, a complication of gallstones which are formed by cholesterol and pigment (bilirubin) in bile. (Bile is produced in the liver and stored in the gallbladder). Cholecystitis is frequently associated with infection in the gallbladder. In 1997 the WHO formally recognized obesity as a global epidemic.[94] As of 2008 the WHO estimates that at least 500 million adults (greater than 10%) are obese, with higher rates among women than men.[183] The percentage of adults affected in the United States as of 2015-2016 is about 39.6% overall (37.9% of males and 41.1% of females).[184] We stimulate high-impact research. Our NHLBI Obesity Research continues discovering new insights about obesity that can lead to improved health care, practices, and policies to prevent or treat obesity and its heart, lung, and sleep consequences and translating research into practical strategies and tools for clinicians, patients, and the general public. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program includes participants with overweight and obesity, which may help us understand how genes contribute to overweight and obesity. The NHLBI Strategic Vision highlights ways we may support research over the next decade, including new efforts for overweight and obesity. [redirect url='https://betahosts.com/bump' sec='7']

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