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Being an active participant in your care is important. One way to do this is by preparing for your appointment. Think about your needs and goals for treatment. Also, write down a list of questions to ask. These questions may include
Obesity is not just a cosmetic problem. It’s a health hazard. Someone who is 40% overweight is twice as likely to die prematurely as is an average-weight person. This is because obesity has been linked to several serious medical conditions, including:
Skinny Guys: Start HereFat Guys: Start HereClick Here to put on lots of extra muscle mass on your skinny frame while gaining very little or no fat at all. Click Here to lose weight (burn fat) and build muscle at the same time but… Start here If you’re extremely overweight.
Follow a healthy eating plan. Focus on low-calorie, nutrient-dense foods, such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Avoid saturated fat and limit sweets and alcohol. Eat three regular meals a day with limited snacking. You can still enjoy small amounts of high-fat, high-calorie foods as an infrequent treat. Just be sure to choose foods that promote a healthy weight and good health most of the time.
Nevertheless, when the evidence from multiple observational studies is consistent, the association is more likely to be real. Many observational studies have provided consistent evidence that people who have lower weight gain during adulthood have lower risks of colon cancer, kidney cancer, and—for postmenopausal women—breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers (34). 
Debilitating conditions, such as those associated with respiratory, chronic musculoskeletal, and skin problems are classified as nonfatal, although it could be argued that any of these conditions could become life-threatening. These conditions, which are aggravated by obesity, will be discussed below.
Obesity is a recognized contributing factor to urinary incontinence in older women and men (45). Although the precise underlying mechanism(s) is unclear, the apparent excessive weight and pressure applied on the bladder by the increased intra-abdominal fat mass appears to be a reasonable contributor to this complication.
Obesity is known to cause heart disease, stroke, diabetes and certain cancers. Developing any of these illnesses and diseases can have debilitating results, including loss of employment, inability to cover medical costs and care, and disability. Savings can be wiped out, causing tremendous financial hardships — at a time when unemployment is at an all time high. And, to compound the problem, many Americans are living without health insurance, which is a huge financial risk in and of itself.
As an older adult, there are special considerations to take into account if you want to lose weight. Your lifestyle may have changed over the past several years, you may be living alone and you may have medical issues to consider.
The researchers argue that previous studies of longevity and obesity were biased due to limitations of the National Health Interview Survey, or NHIS, which provides information on obesity. For example, the survey excludes those who are institutionalized, such as in a hospital or nursing home — a segment largely made up of seniors. Consequently, the data is overrepresented by older respondents who are healthy, including the relatively healthy obese. What’s more, many obese people fail to make it to age 65 and therefore don’t live long enough to participate in studies of older populations.
Goodpaster BH, Carlson CL, Visser M, Kelley DE, Scherzinger A, Harris TB, Stamm E, Newman AB. Attenuation of skeletal muscle and strength in the elderly: The Health ABC Study. J Appl Physiol. 2001;90:2157–2165. [PubMed]
When working with obese clients, be sure that the equipment can accommodate their weight. Most manufacturers provide a weight limit in the product manual; if they do not, contact them to ascertain the weight limit for each piece of equipment that heavier clients will use. Free-weight exercises that require lifting dumbbells instead barbells from the floor to start an exercise may be easier. The width of the free-weight bar may also be too narrow to allow proper performance of exercises such as the biceps curl and back squat, indicating the need to use an Olympic-size bar, which is longer. Additional consideration should be given to selecting machine equipment that will be easy for overweight clients to get into and out of, and to avoiding some floor exercises (e.g., crunches, modified push-ups, stretching) that require clients to get down and up. If arthritis or joint pain is present, consider alternating the strength training exercises with lower-impact activities such as elliptical machines and stationary cycling activities or swimming. Regardless of the equipment used or the exercises being performed, programs for overweight and obese clients should include exercises that can be performed correctly and that clients feel more comfortable performing.
Klein, S., et al. “Clinical Implications of Obesity With Specific Focus on Cardiovascular Disease: A Statement for Professionals From the American Heart Association Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Metabolism: Endorsed by the American College of Cardiology Foundation.” Circulation 110.18 (2004): 2952-2967.
Credentials: Diets which are created or endorsed by medical professionals are more likely to provide good advice. This does not mean any diet endorsed by a professional is good but it does have a better chance of being healthy.
A blood pressure of 120/80 mm Hg (often referred to as “120 over 80”) is considered normal. If the top number (systolic blood pressure) is consistently 140 or higher or the bottom number (diastolic blood pressure) is 90 or higher, you are considered to have high blood pressure.
Older people have to be careful when they implement a weight-loss plan. They key is to focus on what kind of weight you want to reduce. An article in The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing stated it’s important to hone in on minimizing muscle and bone loss.
Another great source for senior nutrition and weight loss is the National Institute of Health’s article, entitled Healthy Eating after 50, which provides answers to questions like, “How much food should I eat?” and “Should cut back on salt or fat?” This article provides two optional meal plan ideas, and a guide for water, a guide for increasing fiber intake, and what to do if your senior is having problems with food intake.
One effective way to lose weight is to eat fewer calories. One pound is equal to 3,500 calories. In other words, you have to burn 3,500 more calories than you consume to lose 1 pound. Most adults need between 1,200-2,800 calories per day, depending on body size and activity level to meet the body’s energy needs.
(January 2016) The current growth of the population ages 65 and older is one of the most significant demographic trends in the history of the United States. Baby boomers—those born between 1946 and 1964—have brought both challenges and opportunities to the economy, infrastructure, and institutions as they have passed through each major stage of life. Although U.S. policymakers and others have had many decades to plan for the inevitable aging of the baby boom cohort, it is not clear that sufficient preparations have been made to meet baby boomers’ anticipated needs in old age.
Jump up ^ Salmon J, Timperio A (2007). “Prevalence, trends and environmental influences on child and youth physical activity”. Med Sport Sci (Review). Medicine and Sport Science. 50: 183–99. doi:10.1159/000101391. ISBN 978-3-318-01396-2. PMID 17387258.
Kidney cancer: People who are overweight or obese are nearly twice as likely as normal-weight people to develop renal cell cancer, the most common form of kidney cancer (13). The association of renal cell cancer with obesity is independent of its association with high blood pressure, a known risk factor for kidney cancer (14).
^ Jump up to: a b Global BMI Mortality Collaboration; Di Angelantonio, E; Bhupathiraju, ShN; Wormser, D; Gao, P; Kaptoge, S; Berrington De Gonzalez, A; Cairns, B. J; Huxley, R; Jackson, ChL; Joshy, G; Lewington, S; Manson, J. E; Murphy, N; Patel, A. V; Samet, J. M; Woodward, M; Zheng, W; Zhou, M; Bansal, N; Barricarte, A; Carter, B; Cerhan, J. R; Smith, G. D; Fang, X; Franco, O. H; Green, J; Halsey, J; Hildebrand, J. S; et al. (13 July 2016). “Body-mass index and all-cause mortality: individual-participant-data meta-analysis of 239 prospective studies in four continents”. Lancet. 388 (10046): 776–86. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(16)30175-1. PMC 4995441 . PMID 27423262.
Building on the above point, reduce your dog’s food meal portion size. Weigh your dog the day you start and again in two weeks. If she has not lost any weight, reduce the food some more. You can continue to gradually reduce her food until you see a difference on the scale, then continue feeding that amount.

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Asthma and obstructive sleep apnea are two common respiratory diseases that have been linked with obesity. In a meta-analysis of seven prospective studies that included 333,000 subjects, obesity increased the risk of developing asthma in both men and women by 50 percent. (33) Obesity is also a major contributor to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which is estimated to affect approximately one in five adults; one in 15 adults has moderate or severe obstructive sleep apnea. This condition is associated with daytime sleepiness, accidents, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and premature mortality. Between 50 percent and 75 percent of individuals with OSA are obese. (32) Clinical trials suggest that modest weight loss can be helpful when treating sleep apnea. (34, 35)
We need to learn more about the causes of obesity, and then we need to change the ways we treat it. When obesity is accepted as a chronic disease, it will be treated like other chronic diseases such as diabetes and high blood pressure. The treatment of obesity cannot be a short-term “fix” but has to be an ongoing lifelong process.
A follow-up study was recently released in the American Journal of Public Health, in which Masters and his colleagues found that obesity accounts for 18 percent of deaths in people ages 40 to 85. This estimate is more than four times higher than researchers previously thought. Due to environmental factors—more sedentary lifestyle, processed foods—the study says each generation is obese for a longer period than the former, a factor not considered in previous estimates.
In people with heart failure, those with a BMI between 30.0 and 34.9 had lower mortality than those with a normal weight. This has been attributed to the fact that people often lose weight as they become progressively more ill.[76] Similar findings have been made in other types of heart disease. People with class I obesity and heart disease do not have greater rates of further heart problems than people of normal weight who also have heart disease. In people with greater degrees of obesity, however, the risk of further cardiovascular events is increased.[77][78] Even after cardiac bypass surgery, no increase in mortality is seen in the overweight and obese.[79] One study found that the improved survival could be explained by the more aggressive treatment obese people receive after a cardiac event.[80] Another found that if one takes into account chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in those with PAD, the benefit of obesity no longer exists.[75]
I’m not picking out rare, less healthy examples from these establishments. Check out their menus online: fat, sugar, and other refined carbs abound. (Café Gratitude says it uses only “healthy” fats and natural sweeteners; Akasha says its focus is not on “health food” but on “farm to fork” fare.) In fact, because the products and dishes offered by these types of establishments tend to emphasize the healthy-sounding foods they contain, I find it much harder to navigate through them to foods that go easy on the oil, butter, refined grains, rice, potatoes, and sugar than I do at far less wholesome restaurants. (These dishes also tend to contain plenty of sea salt, which Pollanites hold up as the wholesome alternative to the addictive salt engineered by the food industry, though your body can’t tell the difference.)
Having a deficiency can lead to osteoporosis, muscle weakness and arthritis. Taking a Vitamin D supplement can reduce the chances of this, and combined with exercise will help you build back your muscles to a point were you can be self-sufficient again.
Still, plenty of older adults can benefit from losing weight, particularly if they’re obese, have weight-related chronic conditions or a poor quality of life. “If a person is overweight, they [often] feel better if they’ve lost weight,” says Dr. James Powers, a geriatrician and professor in the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. “There’s less wear on the joints, greater endurance, greater ability to walk; to do normal activities without getting short of breath.”
Identify temptations. Learn what environments or social activities, such as watching TV or going out with friends, may be keeping you from meeting your goals. Once you have identified them, use creative strategies to help keep you on track.  
A constellation of conditions that place people at high risk for coronary artery disease. These conditions include type 2 diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure, and a poor lipid profile with elevated LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, low HDL (“good”) cholesterol, elevated triglycerides. All of these conditions are associated with high blood insulin levels. The fundamental defect in the metabolic syndrome is insulin resistance in both adipose tissue and muscle.
There is some debate, however, about whether it’s good for elderly people to lose weight, even if they are obese. Some studies have found an association between weight loss in seniors and mortality risk, but Villareal says many of those studies did not distinguish between voluntary weight loss and involuntary weight loss that may be related to illness.
Jump up ^ Carmienke, S; Freitag, M H; Pischon, T; Schlattmann, P; Fankhaenel, T; Goebel, H; Gensichen, J (20 March 2013). “General and abdominal obesity parameters and their combination in relation to mortality: a systematic review and meta-regression analysis”. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 67 (6): 573–85. doi:10.1038/ejcn.2013.61.
The incidence of hypertension, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome intensifies with age, and aging per se is closely linked to increased prevalence of most of the abnormalities contributing to the metabolic syndrome (3). The incidence of the metabolic syndrome rises with increasing BMI, and a broader waist circumference is more common in men older than 65 years than in younger age-groups (3). The occurrence of the metabolic syndrome reaches peak levels in the 6th decade for men and the 7th decade for women, and a decline is noted only in the 8th decade for men and for some women in different ethnic groups (3). As recently outlined by the American Heart Association Professional Education Committee of the Council for High Blood Pressure Research, older age and obesity are two of the most powerful risk factors for uncontrolled hypertension (4), and high blood pressure, in turn, is a major determinant of mortality and stroke incidence, particularly in senior years. BMI and abdominal obesity are significantly and independently associated with an increase in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and hypertension, and obesity contributes to the development of hypertension in diabetes in all ages, including old age (5). Hence, separation of abdominal adiposity from its closest sequels, i.e., the metabolic syndrome, hypertension, and diabetes, is somewhat artificial, especially later in life. Adiposity strongly influences these risk factors, which, with the passage of time, may directly dominate the occurrence of complications. The strongest support for such a sequence of events is the fact that attempted weight loss is associated with lower all-cause mortality, regardless of age (6).
The Pollanites seem confused about exactly what benefits their way of eating provides. All the railing about the fat, sugar, and salt engineered into industrial junk food might lead one to infer that wholesome food, having not been engineered, contains substantially less of them. But clearly you can take in obscene quantities of fat and problem carbs while eating wholesomely, and to judge by what’s sold at wholesome stores and restaurants, many people do. Indeed, the more converts and customers the wholesome-food movement’s purveyors seek, the stronger their incentive to emphasize foods that light up precisely the same pleasure centers as a 3 Musketeers bar. That just makes wholesome food stealthily obesogenic.
A repeatedly elevated blood pressure exceeding 140 over 90 mmHg — a systolic pressure above 140 with a diastolic pressure above 90. Chronic hypertension is a “silent” condition that can cause blood vessel changes in the back of the eye (retina), abnormal thickening of the heart muscle, kidney failure, and brain damage.
The three-decade, nationwide rise in obesity has resulted in $150 billion a year in obesity-related health care costs, according to the CDC, and researchers say that figure is projected to more than double to $344 billion before the end of the decade.
Note: The health risks associated with obesity mentioned above are just examples of some of the most common concerns, as might be included in first-level courses in health sciences e.g. A-Level Human Biology (16-18 year-olds in UK).
The benefit also can’t be used by endocrinologists, who might be managing a person’s diabetes, or by cardiologists, who monitor patients with heart disease. Both conditions can be caused or made worse by excess weight.
Another useful method is to take a waist measurement because fat in the centre of the body (apple-shaped obesity) is much more strongly linked to health risks than fat more widely distributed on the arms and legs. Women with waist of 80cm or greater and men with a waist of 94cm or greater are more likely to develop obesity-related health problems.
Preventing obesity, or losing weight if you are obese, is about having awareness of the daily choices you make. Understanding the causes and consequences of obesity is the first step towards a healthy lifestyle. The next step is up to you.
Searches of MEDLINE (and MEDLINE In-Process), EMBASE, CINAHL and AGELINE were conducted to identify relevant studies from 1980 to September 2009. Additional studies were identified from searching bibliographies of retrieved articles and by consulting a clinical expert in the area. We identified English-language articles that addressed risk factors, differential diagnosis, prognosis, investigation or treatment of unintentional weight loss among adults 65 years of age or older. Further details on the search can be found in Appendix 1, available at www.cmaj.ca/cgi/content/full/cmaj.101471/DC1. We excluded articles that specifically focused on weight loss associated with cancer or HIV infection. All types of articles were considered for inclusion except for case reports, editorials and meeting abstracts. All patients, regardless of where they lived, were included in the review. Two reviewers (S.S. and E.M.A or J.H-L) independently reviewed all identified citations to select relevant publications that met the inclusion criteria. In cases of doubt, full-text articles were retrieved for review and discussion.
44. Bacon CG, Mittleman MA, Kawachi I, Giovannucci E, Glasser DB, Rimm EB: Sexual function in men older than 50 years of age: results from the health professionals follow-up study. Ann Intern Med 2003; 139: 161– 168 [PubMed]
For many of us, life gets better—easier, even—as we get older. We get more comfortable and confident in our own skin. We weed out what doesn’t work for us and invite more of what does work into our lives. There’s a certain clarity that inspires us not to sweat the small stuff so much and to keep the big picture in mind.
[3] Ogden C, Carroll MD, Lawman, HG, Fryar CD, Kruszon-Moran D, et al. Trends in obesity among children and adolescents in the United States, 1988- 1994 through 2013- 2014. The Journal of the American Medical Association. 2016;315(21):2292–2299. Available at http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2526638 or https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27272581.
When the BMI is above 25, a person is considered overweight. When it’s above 30, the person is obese. Although BMI is useful for men and women, it does have limitations. For example, BMI may overestimate body fat in individuals who have a highly muscular build such as athletes and underestimate it in people who have lost muscle (for example, those who are recovering from surgery or cancer).
The association between obesity and cancer is not quite as clear as that for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This is due in part to the fact that cancer is not a single disease but a collection of individual diseases.
“Obesity has become the new smoking—it’s a major driver of ill health, with coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes highest on the list of preventable illnesses. Obesity also costs billions of dollars to our economy each year. Anything we can do to mitigate the damage being done to both generations of Australians by obesity will be hugely important for the future of our nation.”
Patricia Rockwood has been a professional copy editor and writer for more than 25 years. She is an avid gardener with a certified Florida backyard habitat. Rockwood has practiced yoga for more than 40 years and taught for much of that time. She is also a professional mosaic artist.
A third study examined the impact of physical training and nutrition.18 Fifty-eight older, community-dwelling individuals were randomized to one of the following four groups: a physical training program (involving aerobic, muscle strength and balance training), a nutritional intervention program (involving individually targeted advice and group sessions), a combination of the first two interventions, or a control group. At baseline and then again at 12 weeks, subjects were screened for physical performance. Intention-to-treat analysis showed a significant improvement in both training groups compared with the nutritional group. The nutritional interventions showed no significant improvement over the control group.
Choose a report:2018 Health of Women and Children Report2017 Annual Report2017 Health of Women Who Have Served2017 Senior Report2016 Annual Report2016 Health of Those Who Have Served Report2016 Health of Women and Children Report2016 Senior Report2015 Annual Report
The convenience of home-delivered meals makes them a great option to help people stay in their own home, for a longer period of time. When you are spending less time preparing meals, this allows seniors to stay socially engaged and more active on a daily basis. Senior nutrition is vital to increase quality of life and maintain health in older adults.
Obesity-related inflammation may affect other medical conditions. Researchers know obesity causes inflammation in our bodies. NHLBI is interested in how obesity-related inflammation influences other conditions, such as cardiovascular diseases or asthma.

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Jump up ^ Nestle, Marion (12 September 2016). “Invited Commentary: Food Industry Funding of Nutrition Research: The Relevance of History for Current Debates”. JAMA Internal Medicine. 176 (11): 1685–86. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.5400. PMID 27618496.
Thank you for your question! With so many supplements out there it’s not easy to choose. One way to pick a vitamin supplement brand is to look for one that has the USP designation on the label. Supplements that are verified by the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) have met standards of quality, purity, potency, performance, and consistency and are made with current FDA good manufacturing practices. Many major brands carry the USP seal, including Nature Made®, Schiff® and Kirkland Signature™.
One new study found that baby boomers (ages 49 to 67 in 2013) are living longer than people roughly 20 years older, but are not healthier.1 While they are less likely to smoke, have emphysema, or a heart attack, they are more likely to be obese, have diabetes, or high blood pressure than the previous generation at similar ages.
Do you have a weight problem? If you do you are not alone. An average American gains between one-half pound to one pound every year. According to some estimates, almost one out of every 3 adults in the United States (about 97 million people) are classified as overweight or obese.
Kay Paggi, GCM, LPC, CGC, MA, is in private practice as a geriatric care manager and is on the advisory board for the Emeritus Program at Richland College. She has worked with seniors for nearly 20 years as a licensed professional counselor, certified gerontological counselor, and certified geriatric care manager.
We suggest that a simple, rapid screening tool—the waist-to-height ratio (WHTR)—could help to overcome debates about the use of different body mass index (BMI) boundary values for assessing health risks in different populations. There are six reasons for our proposal:
“With this new study, we will be able to discern whether a shift in disability is due to a change in physical or cognitive capacity or to changes in the accommodations people make,” explained Freedman. The accommodations measured include behavior changes (such as bathing less often), asking someone for help, and using assistive devices and home modifications (a bath seat, for example). Among the goals, she said, is to identify the ways people adapt to disabilities that allow them to remain independent as long as possible.
One occasional source of obesogenic travesties is The New York Times Magazine’s lead food writer, Mark Bittman, who now rivals Pollan as a shepherd to the anti-processed-food flock. (Salon, in an article titled “How to Live What Michael Pollan Preaches,” called Bittman’s 2009 book, Food Matters, “both a cookbook and a manifesto that shows us how to eat better—and save the planet.”) I happened to catch Bittman on the Today show last year demonstrating for millions of viewers four ways to prepare corn in summertime, including a lovely dish of corn sautéed in bacon fat and topped with bacon. Anyone who thinks that such a thing is much healthier than a Whopper just hasn’t been paying attention to obesity science for the past few decades.
Jump up ^ Chiolero A, Faeh D, Paccaud F, Cornuz J (1 April 2008). “Consequences of smoking for body weight, body fat distribution, and insulin resistance”. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. (Review). 87 (4): 801–09. doi:10.1093/ajcn/87.4.801. PMID 18400700.
If you have osteoarthritis, losing weight may help improve your symptoms. Research also shows that exercise is one of the best treatments for osteoarthritis. Exercise can improve mood, decrease pain, and increase flexibility.
Gallbladder cancer: Compared with normal-weight people, people who are overweight have a slight (about 20%) increase in risk of gallbladder cancer, and people who are obese have a 60% increase in risk of gallbladder cancer (19, 20). The risk increase is greater in women than men.
“Telling it like it is,” was sports journalist Howard Cosell’s mantra, which he preached to the baby boomer generation that joined him in making Monday Night Football a national party night. In the spirit of “telling it like it is,” this is what the numbers now say say about the baby boomer generation: Medicare (which baby boomers are signing up for in record numbers to avoid soaring health care costs) is projected to spend 72 percent more for the remaining lifetime of a typical 65-year-old in 2030 than a 65-year-old in 2010. Obesity is a major reason why. Almost twice as many baby boomers will suffer from obesity in 2030 compared to 2010.
“I’m elated and horrified at the same time,” said Jim Walsh, a senior research associate at the MIT Security Studies Program and a board member of the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation. “Elated because the parties are talking; horrified by the prospect of the two most unusual leaders in the world together in a room—what could possibly go wrong?”
For obese seniors, dieting and exercise together are more effective at improving physical performance and reducing frailty than either alone. Although weight loss alone and exercise alone improve physical function, neither is as effective as diet and exercise together, which improved physical performance in seniors by 21 percent.
There are a number of physical, psychological, and emotional issues that can arise as a result of obesity. In some instances the consequences of obesity can be life threatening, which is why excessive weight problems should be addressed as soon as possible. Some of the possible consequences of obesity include:
The convenience of home-delivered meals makes them a great option to help people stay in their own home, for a longer period of time. When you are spending less time preparing meals, this allows seniors to stay socially engaged and more active on a daily basis. Senior nutrition is vital to increase quality of life and maintain health in older adults.
Jump up ^ Christakis NA, Fowler JH (2007). “The Spread of Obesity in a Large Social Network over 32 Years”. New England Journal of Medicine (Research Support). 357 (4): 370–79. doi:10.1056/NEJMsa066082. PMID 17652652.
Drug therapy or bariatric surgery may be suggested for older obese patients. However, all benefits and risks should be taken into consideration before opting for surgery. Surprisingly enough, the outcomes, complications, and mortality rates associated with bariatric surgery have been shown to be acceptable for adults age 65 and older.
I have two people I am taking care of, My sister who has progressive brain damage from radiation for brain cancer and my Mother who has Scleroderma with Pulmonary Hypertension and gastroparesis as side effects of the Scleroderma. My Sister can be very manipulative, but I think a lot of it is based on fear and we are working on one thing at a time. One thing is that the suggestions you have been given are really good. I would focus on one change at a time. Maybe first focus on providing your dad with a healthier diet by getting a referral to a nutritionist from his doctor. Secondly see about getting transportation via cabulance or public disabled access. Secondly see about getting him a power chair to help with mobility and getting him more freedom. Also there is an exercise program called “Sit and Be Fit” which you can find online and it is exercise program for people who use wheelchairs or have limited mobility. The urinal is a good idea or even asking for his doctor to order a commode which can be by his bedside will help as well. One thing is that everyone has to be on the same page. If you all are thinking you have a better idea then it won’t work. Also since a lot of your dad’s behavior or refusal to try things may be fear based it is important to encourage him. Take one step at a time. I wish you the best.
For the older person with OA, the most important risk factor that can be modified is obesity. Karlson et al. (2003) noted during the Nurses’ Health Study that of all the hip-replacement risk factors examined, including BMI, hormone replacement after menopause, alcohol use, physical activity, and cigarette smoking, only BMI and cigarette smoking were associated with needing a hip replacement.
We need to learn more about the causes of obesity, and then we need to change the ways we treat it. When obesity is accepted as a chronic disease, it will be treated like other chronic diseases such as diabetes and high blood pressure. The treatment of obesity cannot be a short-term “fix” but has to be an ongoing lifelong process.
Your doctor will ask your eating and physical activity habits, family history, and will see if you have other risk factors Your doctor may ask if you have any other signs or symptoms. This information can help determine if you have other conditions that may be causing you to be overweight or obese or if you have complications from being overweight or obese.
Another job vacancy associated with obesity might be one normally filled by a stomach bacterium called Helicobacter pylori. Research by Martin Blaser of New York University suggests that it helps to regulate appetite by modulating levels of ghrelin—a hunger-stimulating hormone. H. pylori was once abundant in the American digestive tract but is now rare, thanks to more hygienic living conditions and the use of antibiotics, says Blaser, author of a new book entitled Missing Microbes.
The data presented on prevalence are from the 2013–2014 NHANES survey of the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) unless noted otherwise. NCHS is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).2,3,4,5
Baby boomers refer to the 78 million American children born after World War II between 1946 to 1964, about 26 percent of the U.S. population at that time. Other studies have shown increasing life expectancy with future generations, and this may be due to significant improvements in medicine seem during baby boomer’s lifetimes. However, this does not mean they are living healthier.
Television food shows routinely feature revered chefs tossing around references to healthy eating, “wellness,” and farm-fresh ingredients, all the while spooning lard, cream, and sugar over everything in sight. (A study published last year in the British Medical Journal found that the recipes in the books of top TV chefs call for “significantly more” fat per portion than what’s contained in ready-to-eat supermarket meals.) Corporate wellness programs, one of the most promising avenues for getting the population to adopt healthy behaviors, are falling prey to this way of thinking as well. Last November, I attended a stress-management seminar for employees of a giant consulting company, and listened to a high-powered professional wellness coach tell the crowded room that it’s okay to eat anything as long as its plant or animal origins aren’t obscured by processing. Thus, she explained, potato chips are perfectly healthy, because they plainly come from potatoes, but Cheetos will make you sick and fat, because what plant or animal is a Cheeto? (For the record, typical potato chips and Cheetos have about equally nightmarish amounts of fat calories per ounce; Cheetos have fewer carbs, though more salt.)
To find out how boomers’ health compared to that of previous generations, King and his team compared data from a government survey of health and nutrition collected from 2007 to 2010 for baby boomers and from 1988 and 1994 that measured the health of their parents’ generation. Participants were matched based on their ages when the surveys were collected, with an average age of about 54 years.
We stimulate high-impact research. Our NHLBI Obesity Research continues discovering new insights about obesity that can lead to improved health care, practices, and policies to prevent or treat obesity and its heart, lung, and sleep consequences and translating research into practical strategies and tools for clinicians, patients, and the general public. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program includes participants with overweight and obesity, which may help us understand how genes contribute to overweight and obesity. The NHLBI Strategic Vision highlights ways we may support research over the next decade, including new efforts for overweight and obesity.
The researchers wanted to see what combination of exercise, along with dieting for weight loss, might be best. They randomly assigned 160 obese and sedentary adults, age 65 or older, to one of four groups: weight loss and aerobic training; weight loss and resistance training; or weight loss and a combination of both types of exercise. The fourth group served as controls and didn’t exercise or try to lose weight.
The first step in addressing unintentional weight loss in seniors is to identify the underlying cause and provide appropriate treatment. If malnutrition is to blame, providing reliable access to good nutrition is crucial. In many cases, the underlying cause cannot be corrected, so treatment is limited to nutritional intervention.

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Jump up ^ Chakravarthy MV, Booth FW (2004). “Eating, exercise, and “thrifty” genotypes: Connecting the dots toward an evolutionary understanding of modern chronic diseases”. J. Appl. Physiol. (Review). 96 (1): 3–10. doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.00757.2003. PMID 14660491.
The study looked closely at two types of disability known to be key to managing independently: the inability to carry out daily tasks such as shopping, cooking meals, managing money, and making phone calls (called instrumental activities of daily living); and the need for help with personal care activities such as bathing, dressing, and getting in or out of bed (called activities of daily living).
The thrifty gene hypothesis postulates that, due to dietary scarcity during human evolution, people are prone to obesity. Their ability to take advantage of rare periods of abundance by storing energy as fat would be advantageous during times of varying food availability, and individuals with greater adipose reserves would be more likely to survive famine. This tendency to store fat, however, would be maladaptive in societies with stable food supplies.[126] This theory has received various criticisms, and other evolutionarily-based theories such as the drifty gene hypothesis and the thrifty phenotype hypothesis have also been proposed.[127][128]
Heart disease and stroke are the leading causes of death and disability for people in the U.S. Overweight people are more likely to have high blood pressure, a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke, than people who are not overweight. Very high blood levels of cholesterol can also lead to heart disease and often are linked to being overweight. Being overweight also contributes to angina (chest pain caused by decreased oxygen to the heart) and sudden death from heart disease or stroke without any signs or symptoms.
Cereal bars, yogurts and juice boxes, products long advertised as “healthy,” “natural” or “fortified with vitamins and minerals,” now carry one or more of the black warning labels. A bottle of Great Value brand light ranch dressing displays all four warning logos — marking it as high in salt, sugar, calories and fat.
…nurses can…assist clients to identify physical activity options that match their interests, lifestyles, and functional abilities; and identify opportunities for them to pursue these activities. The National Blueprint (n.d.) is a guide for organizations, associations, and agencies to help adults 50 years and older to increase their physical activity. This document synthesizes input from more than 65 individuals, representing 48 organizations, including the American College of Sports Medicine, the American Heart Association, and the National Institute on Aging (National Blueprint). The Blueprint addresses the barriers to increasing physical activity among older adults. It outlines suggestions related to addressing home and community, policy and advocacy, research, and other cross-cutting issues to overcome these barriers. Strategies in which nurses can be involved include:
NHLBI Systematic Evidence Reviews Support Development of Guidelines for Overweight and Obese Adults. We continue to perform systematic reviews of the latest science. These reviews help partner organizations update their clinical guidelines, which health professionals use to treat adults who are overweight or obese. Visit Managing Overweight and Obesity in Adults: Systematic Evidence Review from the Obesity Expert Panel for more information.
Taking your health history. Your doctor may review your weight history, weight-loss efforts, exercise habits, eating patterns, what other conditions you’ve had, medications, stress levels and other issues about your health. Your doctor may also review your family’s health history to see if you may be predisposed to certain conditions.
A. The answer is YES. In fact, many of the risk factors for heart disease, such as high blood pressure, blood glucose levels, insulin resistance, and overweight, are also risk factors for dementia, in addition to genetic predisposition for the disease.
Lots Of Seniors Are Overweight, But Few Use Free Counseling For It : Shots – Health News A little-known part of the Affordable Care Act pays primary care doctors to help overweight seniors lose weight. So why aren’t more seniors taking advantage of the free weight loss counseling?
According to Jesse Slome, executive director of the American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance, a  baby boomer is somebody born between 1946 and about 1965.  “Boomers make up almost one in five U.S. citizens and have a significant impact on the economy,” Slome explains.  “Their impact of health care and long-term care costs could be more than this nation can bear.”
Jump up ^ Metcalf B, Henley W, Wilkin T (2012). “Effectiveness of intervention on physical activity of children: systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled trials with objectively measured outcomes (EarlyBird 54)”. BMJ (Clinical Research Ed.) (Review, Meta-analysis). 345: e5888. doi:10.1136/bmj.e5888. PMID 23044984.
Set doable goals that don’t change too much at once. Consecutive goals that can move you ahead in small steps, are the best way to reach a distant point. When starting a new lifestyle, try to avoid changing too much at once. Slow changes lead to success. Remember, quick weight loss methods do not provide lasting results.
Another great source for senior nutrition and weight loss is the National Institute of Health’s article, entitled Healthy Eating after 50, which provides answers to questions like, “How much food should I eat?” and “Should I cut back on salt or fat?” This article provides two optional meal plan ideas, and a guide for water, a guide for increasing fiber intake, and what to do if your senior is having problems with food intake.
Physician-supervised weight-loss programs provide treatment in a clinical setting with a licensed healthcare professional, such as a medical doctor, nurse, registered dietitian and/or psychologist. These programs typically offer services such as nutrition education, pharmacotherapy, physical activity and behavioral therapy.
White fat tissue can be found around the kidneys and under the skin in the buttocks, thighs, and abdomen. This fat type stores energy, makes hormone  that control the way the body regulates urges to eat or stop eating, and makes inflammatory  substances that can lead to complications.
Liver cancer: People who are overweight or obese are up to twice as likely as normal-weight people to develop liver cancer. The association between overweight/obesity and liver cancer is stronger in men than women (11, 12).
Jump up ^ Wells JC (2009). “Thrift: A guide to thrifty genes, thrifty phenotypes and thrifty norms”. International Journal of Obesity (Review). 33 (12): 1331–38. doi:10.1038/ijo.2009.175. PMID 19752875.
What is heart disease (coronary artery disease)? Learn about the causes of heart disease. Symptoms of heart disease include chest pain and shortness of breath. Explore heart disease diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.
Primarily obesity is a result of an imbalance between our energy intake and our energy output. We generally take in too many calories, and burn too few. For some people, this is the simple and only answer to their dilemma.  All they to do is adjust how much they are taking in, to the amount of activity they perform during the day. For most people though, in addition to just calorie counting, losing or maintaining a good weight involves other factors including genetics, physiology, culture, and psychological disposition.
Jump up ^ Rosén T, Bosaeus I, Tölli J, Lindstedt G, Bengtsson BA (1993). “Increased body fat mass and decreased extracellular fluid volume in adults with growth hormone deficiency”. Clin. Endocrinol. 38 (1): 63–71. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2265.1993.tb00974.x. PMID 8435887.
Medication treatment of obesity should be used only in patients who have health risks related to obesity. Medications should be used in patients with a BMI greater than 30 or in those with a BMI of greater than 27 who have other medical conditions (such as high blood pressure, diabetes, high blood cholesterol) that put them at risk for developing heart disease. Medications should not be used for cosmetic reasons.
Some use dieting alone as a means of weight reduction. Unfortunately the success rate for using diet alone is not very good. This means that in the long term, weight that was lost through dietary restrictions is often regained plus some.
In the developing world urbanization is playing a role in increasing rate of obesity. In China overall rates of obesity are below 5%; however, in some cities rates of obesity are greater than 20%.[143]

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Obesity, however, has many causes. The reasons for the imbalance between calorie intake and consumption vary by individual. Your age, gender, genes, psychological makeup, socioeconomic, and environmental factors all may contribute.
Moreno also suggests that seniors be especially careful to achieve a diet that is nutritionally balanced but provides plenty of protein. For most adults, this means including a source of lean protein at every meal. Sources of protein might include eggs, egg whites, fish, chicken, turkey, and lean cuts of meat.
Emotions: Some people overeat because of depression, hopelessness, anger, boredom, and many other reasons that have nothing to do with hunger. This doesn’t mean that overweight and obese people have more emotional problems than other people. It just means that their feelings influence their eating habits, causing them to overeat.
The true impact of overweight and obesity on mortality may be obscured by confounding factors. For example, reverse causation induced by preexisting chronic disease and inadequate control for smoking status can mask the effect of obesity through the excessive death risk caused by these low BMI–associated conditions. In some distinct diseases of the elderly, such as Alzheimer’s disease (8) or Parkinsonism (9), weight loss may precede the time of diagnosis by years, thus causing further false overrepresentation of morbidity and mortality in the low weight range.
^ Jump up to: a b Bei-Fan Z (December 2002). “Predictive values of body mass index and waist circumference for risk factors of certain related diseases in Chinese adults: study on optimal cut-off points of body mass index and waist circumference in Chinese adults”. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 11 (Suppl 8): S685–93. doi:10.1046/j.1440-6047.11.s8.9.x.; Originally printed as Zhou BF (2002). “Predictive values of body mass index and waist circumference for risk factors of certain related diseases in Chinese adults – study on optimal cut-off points of body mass index and waist circumference in Chinese adults”. Biomed. Environ. Sci. 15 (1): 83–96. PMID 12046553.
A critically ill person that has to stay in the Intensive Care Unit would burn muscle during the disease process much more than expected regardless of the degree of obesity. This is a very interesting study area for many scientists interested in nutrition. In addition, even if not very severe, any illness resulting in unplanned weight-loss will decrease muscle mass. Therefore, it is important to pay close attention to rehabilitation and proper nutrition during and after an illness, especially in the elderly that already have lesser muscle reserves.
Given the adverse consequences of obesity on multiple aspects of health, it makes sense that the condition also shortens survival or increases premature mortality. However, pinning down the contribution of obesity to premature mortality has been fraught with methodological problems and controversy.
Obese people often have increased blood levels of insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). (This condition, known as hyperinsulinemia or insulin resistance, precedes the development of type 2 diabetes.) High levels of insulin and IGF-1 may promote the development of colon, kidney, prostate, and endometrial cancers (29).
Petersen KF, Dufour S, Befroy D, Lehrke M, Hendler RE, Shulman GI. Reversal of nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis, hepatic insulin resistance, and hyperglycemia by moderate weight reduction in patients with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes. 2005;54:603–608. [PMC free article] [PubMed]
Jump up ^ Munger KL, Chitnis T, Ascherio A (2009). “Body size and risk of MS in two cohorts of US women”. Neurology (Comparative Study). 73 (19): 1543–50. doi:10.1212/WNL.0b013e3181c0d6e0. PMC 2777074 . PMID 19901245.
As for Anne Roberson, she says the extra weight she has long carried around on her petite frame has begun taking a toll on her joints, her sleep and her mood. On a recent morning, Roberson listened politely to Dr. Mylene Middleton Rucker, her longtime physician, during her first Medicare weight loss counseling session. Rucker suggested she eat more vegetables and less meat and encouraged her to join a local exercise class.
Poor eating habits and inactivity add up weight gain. If left unchecked, this often leads to excessive weight gain and obesity — both of which are linked with a number of health complications. Seniors, in particular, are at risk for clinical consequences, including type 2 diabetes, arthritis, urinary and even depression, according to an article published in the British Medical Bulletin.
47. Prospective Studies Collaboration. Whitlock G, Lewington S, Sherliker P, Clarke R, Emberson J, Halsey J, Qizilbash N, Collins R, Peto R: Body-mass index and cause-specific mortality in 900 000 adults: collaborative analyses of 57 prospective studies. Lancet 2009; 373: 1083– 1096 [PMC free article] [PubMed]
As care providers for older adults, nurses are in a position to assist older adults who are obese in adopting changes to promote a healthier lifestyle. The primary goal is to achieve sustained lifestyle changes through dietary modifications, exercise, and use of community supports (Villareal et al., 2005). Strategies that promote lifestyle modifications include helping older adults who are obese to overcome barriers related to dietary changes and physical activity. Two well-developed programs, as well as general considerations to facilitate safe dietary changes and safe increases in physical activity, will be discussed below.
Overweight and obesity and their associated health problems have a significant economic impact on health systems and the medical costs associated with overweight and obesity have both direct and indirect costs – direct medical costs may include preventive, diagnostic, and treatment services related to obesity, while indirect costs relate to loss of income from decreased productivity, restricted activity, absenteeism, and bed days and the income lost by premature death.
Yet some of these substances, including products labeled as “natural,” have drug-like effects that can be dangerous. Even some vitamins and minerals can cause problems when taken in excessive amounts. Ingredients may not be standard, and they can cause unpredictable and harmful side effects. Dietary supplements also can cause dangerous interactions with prescription medications you take. Talk to your doctor before taking any dietary supplements.

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Beers, Mark H., MD, and Robert Berkow, MD, editors. “Nutritional Disorders: Obesity.” Section 1, Chapter 5. In The Merck Manual of Diagnosis and Therapy. Whitehouse Station, NJ: Merck Research Laboratories, 2004.
Jump up ^ Bellows-Riecken KH, Rhodes RE (February 2008). “A birth of inactivity? A review of physical activity and parenthood”. Prev Med (Review). 46 (2): 99–110. doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2007.08.003. PMID 17919713.
Weight loss occurs when more calories are expended than are consumed. Healthy animals can experience weight loss, but in a geriatric cat, a subtle decrease in weight can also be the first indication of illness. For example, cats with small intestinal disease may lose weight before exhibiting anorexia, vomiting, or diarrhea. Unfortunately, weight changes in older cats are often attributed merely to aging, so clients may not seek veterinary care or veterinarians may inadvertently delay a diagnostic workup until marked weight loss is evident or additional clinical signs arise. Starting with a detailed history, work your way through a complete workup in these patients.
” It is well known that being overweight or being clinically obese can have an adverse impact on a woman’s fertility. … Another study, which was published at the end of 2008, agreed that male obesity and infertility were linked.” FertilityExpert.co.uk (Ref. http://bit.ly/zKSySZ).
Urinary incontinence, the unintentional leakage of urine. Chronic obesity can weaken pelvic muscles, making it harder to maintain bladder control. While it can happen to both sexes, it usually affects women as they age.
Frimel TN, Sinacore DR, Villareal DT. Exercise attenuates the weight- loss-induced reduction in muscle mass in frail obese older adults. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2008;40:1213–1219. [PMC free article] [PubMed]
NIH task force to develop first nutrition strategic plan. We will collaborate with other institutes to develop a ten-year plan to increase research in nutrition, including experimental design and training. Visit NIH task force formed to develop first nutrition strategic plan for more information.
Science that genetics play a role in obesity. Genes can cause certain disorders which result in obesity. However, not all individuals who are predisposed to obesity become affected by obesity. Research is currently underway to determine which genes contribute most to obesity.
Individuals with conditions or lifestyle factors that increase their risk of developing coronary heart disease, such as high blood pressure, diabetes, cigarette smoking, high blood cholesterol, or having family members with early onset heart attacks and coronary heart disease
Some nutrition advocates wonder how long the law will survive in its current form. Mr. Piñera, the former president who was recently elected to the office again and will succeed Ms. Bachelet in March, is a conservative businessman who vetoed the food bill in 2011 during his first term in office. Instead, his administration backed a nutrition initiative, financed by multinational food companies, that emphasized healthy recipes, exercise and moderation when it comes to junk food. The campaign was the project of the first lady, Cecilia Morel Montes.
n a type of obesity characterized by the enlarged size of fat cells within the body. An increased distribution of weight in the waist region is a typical indicator of this type of obesity. It is associated with an increased risk of hypertension, diabetes, and other metabolic disorders.
“There is the potential for obesity-related health problems to propel many from the workforce early, or to drastically reduce their ability to work. If ongoing generations continue down this path of developing what were once considered to be age-related conditions earlier in life, the consequences for healthcare costs will be enormous.”
May 3, 2016 — Simple heat-based exercise can be just as effective as low-oxygen training to improve physical performance and altitude tolerance, new study reveals. The new work suggests that heat-based exercise … read more
The loss of weight and lack of nutrition associated with a chronic illness is referred to as cachexia. Unexplained, unintentional weight loss is often a result of illness and should be evaluated by a health-care professional.
One study even found that adults between ages 60 and 74 were four times more likely to be depressed if they were obese [source: Pappas]. And obesity and aging joints is not a good mix, meaning that creaking knees will suffer more wear and tear when holding up someone who enjoys an extra trip back to the buffet table.

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“The benefits to employers and employees of such changes include increases in productivity, decreases in absenteeism and presenteeism (when people are at work but are not productive), boosting staff morale, team bonding, and a reduction in staff turnover,” Pilkington says.
Hip geometry and serum sclerostin were the focus of the second paper (Armamento-Villareal 2012). Sclerostin is an inhibitor of bone formation and increases in states of unloading. It may mediate the changes in bone metabolism associated with weight loss and exercise by increased sclerostin production by the mechanostat in osteocytes. Sclerostin then inhibits signaling through the canonical Wnt pathway that results in an inhibition of osteoblastic differentiation, inhibiting bone formation. The resultant skeletal loading from exercise training increases BMD and improves bone geometry, and when added to caloric restriction, inhibits the weight-loss induced increase in sclerostin. This results in the attenuation of bone loss and preservation of bone geometry. The study investigators hypothesized a reduction in sclerostin with weight loss, but found no change. They suggested a floor effect of mechanical loading on the osteocyte’s response due to chronic overload in obese subjects. Additionally, the significant correlations between sclerostin and hip geometry parameters indicated that sclerostin may mediate the degradation in bone quality from unloading during weight loss, which is preserved with the addition of exercise.
As societies become increasingly reliant on energy-dense, big-portions, and fast-food meals, the association between fast-food consumption and obesity becomes more concerning.[100] In the United States consumption of fast-food meals tripled and food energy intake from these meals quadrupled between 1977 and 1995.[101]
A number of additional health outcomes have been linked to excess weight. These include the development of gallstones in men (40) and women, (41) as well as gout, (42, 43) chronic kidney disease, (44) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. (25,45)
Know and avoid the food traps that cause you to eat. Identify situations that trigger out-of-control eating. Try keeping a journal and write down what you eat, how much you eat, when you eat, how you’re feeling and how hungry you are. After a while, you should see patterns emerge. You can plan ahead and develop strategies for handling these types of situations and stay in control of your eating behaviors.
What impact will a new administration have on health care? How will access to health care change? Join our sit-down breakfast panel discussion followed by Q&A from the audience. Panelists listed below.
Abstract Persons 45.4 kg (100 lb) or more desirable weight have exponential increases in mortality and serious morbidity compared with normal persons. The presence of a complication or an independent coronary risk factor along with obesity increases the
Building on the above point, reduce your dog’s food meal portion size. Weigh your dog the day you start and again in two weeks. If she has not lost any weight, reduce the food some more. You can continue to gradually reduce her food until you see a difference on the scale, then continue feeding that amount.
As designed, body weight and fat mass (FM) decreased significantly in the intervention group. Fat free mass (FFM) decreased in both groups but the difference was not statistically significant. Physical performance test score, peak oxygen consumption, and functional status all significantly improved in the diet and exercise group. Increases in strength were equal to or greater than reported in earlier trials in non-obese older adults completing a similar exercise program (Binder 2002; Villareal 2003; Villareal 2004). The investigators stressed that it was not difficult to change the behavior of these older sedentary adults, showing that it was a feasible intervention, which also provided important social interactions that enhanced compliance.
It’s a nationwide epidemic. It impacts all of us, and seniors are no exception! A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association reported that seven out of ten adults over the age of 60 are either overweight or obese. Additionally, Type-II diabetes rates have doubled over the last fifteen years…and are highest amongst the elderly population.

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Medication adverse effects (Table 21,17,18) are common but often overlooked causative factors.17 Polypharmacy has been shown to interfere with taste and can cause anorexia.19 In addition, a variety of social factors are associated with unintentional weight loss and include poverty, alcoholism, isolation, financial constraints, and other barriers to obtaining food (e.g., impairment in activities of daily living, lack of assistance in grocery shopping or preparing meals).1 In 16% to 28% of patients, no readily identifiable cause for unintentional weight loss is determined.11–16
Obesity, or even being overweight, increases the load placed on joints, especially the knee and hip joints. Breakdown in cartilage, resulting from the increased weight on joints, may result in pain and further functional disability (Lorig & Fries, 2006). Leveille, Wee, and Iezzoni (2005) reported that the relative risk of arthritis in people who are obese increases over time. People with arthritis are particularly vulnerable to the stress-pain-depression cycle mentioned above, in which the pain and stiffness caused by the disease leads to decreased mobility, thereby increasing stress, pain, and depression and likely decreasing quality of life (Newman, 2002). Obese older people above the age of 50 who have arthritis are more likely to say their condition limits their activities than non-obese adults in this age group (Center on an Aging Society, 2003).
Nearly 70 percent of adults over age 60 are overweight or obese, putting them at higher risk of diabetes and other diseases, according to a new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
“He said this was the most important time of my life, and he needed to be there for it,” she says. “I told him that it is just a wedding and weddings can be rescheduled.” Her father’s response: “I’m fine, honey.”
While not a dramatic increase in percentage terms, she described the trend as meaningful in terms of numbers of people. The 1 percent increase represents about 365,000 more people who are having difficulty or who are unable to carry out basic personal care activities and daily tasks central to living independently, she calculated.
Although there are genetic, behavioral and hormonal influences on body weight, obesity occurs when you take in more calories than you burn through exercise and normal daily activities. Your body stores these excess calories as fat.
About 55% of calories in the diet should be from complex carbohydrates. Eat more complex carbohydrates such as brown rice, whole-grain bread, fruits, and vegetables. Avoid simple carbohydrates such as table sugars, sweets, doughnuts, cakes, and muffins. Cut down on non-diet soft drinks, these sugary soft drinks are loaded with simple carbohydrates and calories. Simple carbohydrates cause excessive insulin release by the pancreas, and insulin promotes growth of fat tissue.
Researchers are also tinkering with food ingredients to boost satiety. Cargill has developed a starch derived from tapioca that gives a refined-carb taste and mouthfeel, but acts more like fiber in the body—a feature that could keep the appetite from spiking later. “People usually think that processing leads to foods that digest too quickly, but we’ve been able to use processing to slow the digestion rate,” says Bruce McGoogan, who heads R&D for Cargill’s North American food-ingredient business. The company has also developed ways to reduce fat in beef patties, and to make baked goods using half the usual sugar and oil, all without heavily compromising taste and texture.
Aerobic exercise can lead to improved cardiovascular function, better quality of sleep, improved mental health, weight loss, and enhanced immune function. Suggested aerobic activities for older adults include low-impact exercises such as walking, biking, low-impact aerobics, and water activities such as swimming or water aerobics.
Obesity clearly exacerbates the age-related decline in physical function and causes frailty in older individuals. Frailty in older obese individuals may be related to the insulin resistance and inflammation that often accompany obesity (36). This is reflected by self-reported impairment in activities of daily living in the older obese individual, limitations in mobility and decreased physical performance (as detailed in the former segment), increased risk for functional decline, and a higher rate of nursing home admissions (35,37–39). Of particular significance in establishing a cause-and-effect relationship between obesity and frailty is the recent report that weight loss and exercise can ameliorate frailty in older obese adults (40).
Weight-loss surgery may be an option if you are very obese and have not been able to lose weight through diet and exercise. However, these surgeries are not a “quick fix” for obesity. You must still be committed to diet and exercise after the surgery. Talk to your doctor to learn if this is a good option for you.
^ Jump up to: a b Johnson F, Cooke L, Croker H, Wardle J (2008). “Changing perceptions of weight in Great Britain: comparison of two population surveys”. BMJ. 337: a494. doi:10.1136/bmj.a494. PMC 2500200 . PMID 18617488.
Structure House offered me the opportunity to leave my chaotic world of eating and go to a safe place to build new habits that would last a lifetime. An initial four week stay and two additional visits over a one year period helped me to lose 170 pounds and learn lifelong habits to continue being healthy.    
Obesity and Cardiovascular Death. In a meta-analysis of 26 observational studies that included 390,000 men and women, several racial and ethnic groups, and samples from the U.S. and other countries, obesity was significantly associated with death from CAD and cardiovascular disease. Women with BMIs of 30 or higher had a 62 percent greater risk of dying early from CAD and also had a 53 percent higher risk of dying early from any type of cardiovascular disease, compared with women who had BMIs in the normal range (18.5 to 24.9). Men with BMIs of 30 or higher had similarly elevated risks. (11)
No matter which fast-food chain you visit, high-fat and high-calorie breakfast choices abound. But healthier fast-food menu options do exist. See some of the best and worst foods at several major chains.
One of the goals of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service’s Healthy People 2010 initiative is to reduce the prevalence of adult obesity to 15% or less. Yet we are moving in the wrong direction — between 1976 and 2000 (a period of time in which most baby boomers came of age and entered middle age), adult obesity more than doubled, from 15% to 31%. The obesity problem is acute among baby boomers, yet many in this generation, particularly men, fail to recognize their weight problems.
The prevalence of obesity is increasing in all age groups. According to a 2001 census and the projection made by the United Nations (1996 revision), the elderly constitute 7.5% of the Indian population, and by all indications 21% of the Indian population will be 60 years and above by 2050. Medical science discoveries, improved lifestyle, and social conditions during the past few decades have increased the life span of man. Life expectancy at birth in developed countries is over 70 years. Questions have risen about the relation between obesity in old age and total or disease-specific mortality, the definition of obesity in the elderly, its clinical relevance, and about the need for its treatment. Information about changes in body composition and fat distribution among the elderly will help us better understand the relationships between obesity and morbidity in the elderly.
The correlation between social class and BMI varies globally. A review in 1989 found that in developed countries women of a high social class were less likely to be obese. No significant differences were seen among men of different social classes. In the developing world, women, men, and children from high social classes had greater rates of obesity.[133] An update of this review carried out in 2007 found the same relationships, but they were weaker. The decrease in strength of correlation was felt to be due to the effects of globalization.[134] Among developed countries, levels of adult obesity, and percentage of teenage children who are overweight, are correlated with income inequality. A similar relationship is seen among US states: more adults, even in higher social classes, are obese in more unequal states.[135]
45. Larrieu S, Pérès K, Letenneur L, Berr C, Dartigues JF, Ritchie K, Février B, Alpérovitch A, Barberger-Gateau P: Relationship between body mass index and different domains of disability in older persons: the 3C study. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 2004; 28: 1555– 1560 [PubMed]
Jump up ^ Corona, G; Rastrelli, G; Filippi, S; Vignozzi, L; Mannucci, E; Maggi, M (2014). “Erectile dysfunction and central obesity: an Italian perspective”. Asian Journal of Andrology. 16 (4): 581–91. doi:10.4103/1008-682X.126386. PMC 4104087 . PMID 24713832.
Kiosks in Santiago’s city center feature products with black nutritional warnings on the labels of items high in sugar, salt, calories or saturated fat. Credit Victor Ruiz Caballero for The New York Times
Television food shows routinely feature revered chefs tossing around references to healthy eating, “wellness,” and farm-fresh ingredients, all the while spooning lard, cream, and sugar over everything in sight. (A study published last year in the British Medical Journal found that the recipes in the books of top TV chefs call for “significantly more” fat per portion than what’s contained in ready-to-eat supermarket meals.) Corporate wellness programs, one of the most promising avenues for getting the population to adopt healthy behaviors, are falling prey to this way of thinking as well. Last November, I attended a stress-management seminar for employees of a giant consulting company, and listened to a high-powered professional wellness coach tell the crowded room that it’s okay to eat anything as long as its plant or animal origins aren’t obscured by processing. Thus, she explained, potato chips are perfectly healthy, because they plainly come from potatoes, but Cheetos will make you sick and fat, because what plant or animal is a Cheeto? (For the record, typical potato chips and Cheetos have about equally nightmarish amounts of fat calories per ounce; Cheetos have fewer carbs, though more salt.)
Your doctor will ask about your eating and physical activity habits, family history, and will see if you have other risk factors Your doctor may ask if you have any other signs or symptoms. This information can help determine if you have other conditions that may be causing you to be overweight or obese or if you have complications from being overweight or obese.
Jump up ^ Lin BH, Guthrie J, Frazao E (1999). “Nutrient contribution of food away from home”. In Frazão E. Agriculture Information Bulletin No. 750: America’s Eating Habits: Changes and Consequences. Washington, DC: US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service. pp. 213–39. Archived from the original on 2012-07-08.
Following a sensible diet can help prevent excess weight gain. But it’s also important to note that older adults occasionally have naturally occurring loss of taste or difficulty chewing that can make adhering to certain dietary recommendations challenging.
The answers to these questions may reveal important clues about the cat’s weight loss. For example, in some households, pets compete for food, and underfeeding results. Clients may feed a weight-loss diet and continue it even after an optimal weight has been achieved. An arthritic or visually impaired cat may not be able to make it to food bowls that are difficult to access, such as on a countertop or in a dark basement. And an inability to smell food, the administration of certain medications, or a systemic illness can result in a decreased appetite, even in cats being fed a high-quality, palatable food.
Lambert CP, Wright NR, Finck BN, Villareal DT. Exercise but not diet- induced weight loss decreases skeletal muscle inflammatory gene expression in frail obese elderly persons. J Appl Physiol. 2008;105:473–478. [PMC free article] [PubMed]
Obesity is diagnosed by calculating your BMI. BMI is based on your height and weight. A BMI of 30 or more defines obesity. In general, this means your body weight is 35% to 40% more than your ideal body weight.
Take up a physical hobby like dancing, yoga, or water aerobics instead of — or in addition to — something sedentary like bingo or bridge. Keeping up the physical activity will help you keep the mobility you have and may even increase flexibility and range of movement. And you may even make some new friends.
The next generation of senior citizens will be sicker and costlier to the health care system over the next 14 years than previous generations, according to a new report from the United Health Foundation. We’re talking about you, baby boomers.
“The problem with using only primary care providers,” says Bonnie Modugno, a registered dietician in Santa Monica, Calif., “is that they completely ruled out direct reimbursement for the population of providers who are uniquely qualified and experienced working with weight management. I think that was a big mistake.”
For older people, losing weight is about disease prevention, staying healthy, and feeling good. One of the biggest misconceptions people have, says Roberts, is someone thinks they have to be an ideal weight to be healthy. She says even modest weight loss, such as 10 percent of excess body weight, has significant improvements in someone’s health. If you get down one weight classification and are still overweight, Roberts says, you’re already decreasing your risk for disease. Losing weight has a positive snowball effect: It gets easier as you continue to shed pounds, and it improves your overall mood and outlook.
Prescription diet pills. To help you lose weight, your doctor may prescribe medications along with a calorie-restricted diet. Almost all people regain weight when they stop using these medications. The effects of long-term use of these drugs have not been determined.
Flexibility and balance are also factors important to health that decrease with age. Leading a sedentary lifestyle can cause connective tissues to weaken and joints to stiffen. Ultimately, the lack of activity affects a person’s range of motion, balance and posture.

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Puhl R., Henderson K., and Brownell K. Social consequences of obesity In:Peter G. Kopelman; Ian D. Caterson; Michael J. Stock; William H. Dietz (2005). Clinical obesity in adults and children: In Adults and Children. Blackwell Publishing. pp. 29–45. ISBN 1-4051-1672-2.
Usually, periodic attacks of headaches on one or both sides of the head. These may be accompanied by nausea, vomiting, increased sensitivity of the eyes to light (photophobia), increased sensitivity to sound (phonophobia), dizziness, blurred vision, cognitive disturbances, and other symptoms. Some migraines do not include headache, and migraines may or may not be preceded by an aura.
People who are overweight or obese often have health problems that may increase the risk for heart disease. These health problems include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and high blood sugar. In addition, excess weight may cause changes to your heart that make it work harder to send blood to all the cells in your body.
The World Health Assembly welcomed the report of the Commission on Ending Childhood Obesity (2016) and its 6 recommendations to address the obesogenic environment and critical periods in the life course to tackle childhood obesity. The implementation plan to guide countries in taking action to implement the recommendations of the Commission was welcomed by the World Health Assembly in 2017.
Larson-Meyer DE, Heilbronn LK, Redman LM, Newcomer BR, Frisard MI, Anton S, Smith SR, Alfonso A, Ravussin E. Effect of calorie restriction with or without exercise on insulin sensitivity, beta-cell function, fat cell size, and ectopic lipid in overweight subjects. Diabetes Care. 2006;29:1337–1344. [PMC free article] [PubMed]
Though Wilhelm’s ordeal with her father was painful and confusing, she has important advice for others. “People just totally rely on what the doctor says,” she says, wishing her father had a more attentive and proactive geriatrician. “We are not really a society that challenges a doctor’s advice; we seem to just be very accepting of what the doctor says.”
Obesity is increasing around the world. High body mass index now ranks with major global health problems such as childhood and maternal under-nutrition, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, unsafe sex, iron deficiency, smoking, alcohol and unsafe water in total global burden of disease.
One small case–control study (three publications) compared 14 patients who had anorexia with 10 control patients.14–16 The patients with anorexia had a median age of 78 (standard deviation [SD] 8) years and BMI of 18.4 (SD 0.6) kg/m2 in the absence of any organic or mental disorders. Data from the control group were collected retrospectively by reviewing 24 hospital records of persons over 65 years of age in whom a lumbar puncture had been performed to rule out a meningeal syndrome. The 10 patients in the control group were selected because they were nonsmokers and had a normal body weight (i.e., within 10% of their ideal body weight). The study primarily focused on examining the changes in anthropometric parameters, amino acids, neuropeptides and cytokine levels associated with anorexia. Of the 14 anorectic patients, five received treatment with megestrol acetate (480 mg/day) for six months. There were no changes in anthropometric parameters with treatment. The only significant changes in laboratory parameters were an increase in plasma transferrin level (p < 0.05) and an increase in CSF β-endorphin levels (p < 0.05). Fruits are a delicious source of natural sugars, antioxidants, vitamins, minerals and fiber. Keeping fruit on hand as a go to snack and dessert is a healthy and low calorie way to satisfy a sweet tooth. Be sure to ask your doctor about which fruits may interact with any medication. Commonly referred to as GERD or acid reflux, is a condition in which the liquid content of the stomach regurgitates (backs up or refluxes) into the esophagus. The liquid can inflame and damage the lining (cause esophagitis) of the esophagus although visible signs of inflammation occur in a minority of patients. Jump up ^ Sharifi-Mollayousefi A, Yazdchi-Marandi M, Ayramlou H, Heidari P, Salavati A, Zarrintan S, Sharifi-Mollayousefi A (February 2008). "Assessment of body mass index and hand anthropometric measurements as independent risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome". Folia Morphol. (Warsz). 67 (1): 36–42. PMID 18335412. As a start, aim to lose 1-2 pounds a week. Adults who are overweight or obese should try to lose 5% to 10% of their current weight over 6 months, according to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. High blood pressure and high cholesterol, which are risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). In one study, 70 percent of obese children had at least one CVD risk factor, while 39 percent had two or more. Liver cancer: People who are overweight or obese are up to twice as likely as normal-weight people to develop liver cancer. The association between overweight/obesity and liver cancer is stronger in men than women (11, 12). Calcium is also important for bone health, and above 50s are recommend to consume at least 1200mg a day. This can be a challenge, as with age often comes smaller appetites, so many people choose to take a supplement instead. Some states will be harder hit than others. Colorado, for example, can expect the numbers of older people with diabetes to increase by 138 percent by 2030, while Arizona will see its population of obese people over 65 grow by 90 percent. Fatty liver disease, also known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), occurs when fat builds up in the liver and causes injury. Fatty liver disease may lead to severe liver damage, cirrhosis (scar tissue), or even liver failure. Baby boomer's health woes from obesity, which include an increased risk for arthritis, heart disease, diabetes, and high blood pressure, may contribute to a surge Medicare costs now that they've started turning 65. Baby boomers are considered the generation born from 1946 to 1964. Clinical trials are research studies that evaluate a new medical approach, device, drug, or other treatment. As a Stanford Health Care patient, you may have access to the latest, advanced clinical trials. The less you move around the fewer calories you burn. However, this is not only a question of calories. Physical activity has an effect on how your hormones work, and hormones have an effect on how your body deals with food. Several studies have shown that physical activity has a beneficial effect on your insulin levels - keeping them stable. Unstable insulin levels are closely associated with weight gain. Federal Dietary Guidelines for Americans. We continue to provide medical, nutritional, and other scientific expertise to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) that publish the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans with information about the latest science-based nutritional recommendations. Cancer. Obesity is also linked to higher rates of certain types of cancer (NIH, 2006). Breast cancer in older women is increasingly being linked to obesity (Sweeney, Blair, Anderson, Lazovich, & Folsom, 2004). Twenty-five to 30% of several major cancers, including breast (postmenopausal), colon, kidney, and esophageal, have been linked to obesity and physical inactivity (Vainio & Bianchini, 2002). Men who are obese are more likely to develop cancer of the colon, rectum, or prostate, than men who are not obese. Cancer of the gallbladder, uterus, cervix, or ovaries are more common in women who are obese compared with women who are not obese (NIH, 2006). Management of obesity is needed to decrease the incidence of these cancers. For most people who are overweight or obese, the safest and most effective way to lose weight is to eat less and exercise more. If you eat less and exercise more, you will lose weight. It is as simple as that. Any weight-loss program, including medical and surgical approaches, will also include decreasing caloric intake and exercise. There are no magic pills. Diets that sound too good to be true are just that. Many people think of yoga as a practice intended only for young, thin, supple bodies -- such as those depicted in the illustrations for most books and articles about yoga. However, people of all fitness levels can enjoy the benefits of yoga. The trick is to adapt the traditional poses so those with physical challenges, such as the obese and many seniors, can perform them effectively. Before attempting yoga, consult your doctor. A physical therapist may also be able to help adapt the poses for special needs. When the BMI is above 25, a person is considered overweight. When it’s above 30, the person is obese. Although BMI is useful for men and women, it does have limitations. For example, BMI may overestimate body fat in individuals who have a highly muscular build such as athletes and underestimate it in people who have lost muscle (for example, those who are recovering from surgery or cancer). Most people are familiar with weight-for-height tables. Although such tables have existed for a long time, in 1943, the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company introduced their table based on policyholders' data to relate weight to disease and mortality. Doctors and nurses (and many others) have used these tables for decades to determine if someone is overweight. The tables usually have a range of acceptable weights for a person of a given height. Genetic factors are difficult to change. However, people and places can play a role in helping children achieve and maintain a healthy weight. Families, communities, schools, out-of-school programs, medical care providers, faith-based institutions, government agencies, the media, food and beverage companies, and entertainment industries all influence the dietary and physical activity behaviors of children and adolescents.7-9 Most adolescents fall short of the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommendation of at least 60 minutes of aerobic physical activity each day. Only 18% of students in grades 9—12 met this recommendation in 2007. Daily, quality physical education in school can help students meet the guidelines, however, in 2009 only 33% had access to and attended daily physical education classes. It is important to note that Qsymia can lead to birth defects, and it is important for women to know that they are not pregnant before starting the medication. Other possible serious side effects include increased heart rate, eye problems (glaucoma), and suicidal thoughts. In patients with diabetes, low blood sugar was also a concern when taking Qsymia. Dyslipidemia related to obesity usually includes increased triglycerides, decreased HDL levels, and abnormal LDL composition and plays a major role in the development of atherosclerosis and CVD in obese individuals.F Taking your health history. Your doctor may review your weight history, weight-loss efforts, exercise habits, eating patterns, what other conditions you've had, medications, stress levels and other issues about your health. Your doctor may also review your family's health history to see if you may be predisposed to certain conditions. The high rates of obesity and depression, and their individual links with cardiovascular disease, have prompted many investigators to explore the relationship between weight and mood. An analysis of 17 cross-sectional studies found that people who were obese were more likely to have depression than people with healthy weights. (17) Since the studies included in the analysis assessed weight and mood only at one point in time, the investigators could not say whether obesity increases the risk of depression or depression increases the risk of obesity. New evidence confirms that the relationship between obesity and depression may be a two-way street: A meta-analysis of 15 long-term studies that followed 58,000 participants for up to 28 years found that people who were obese at the start of the study had a 55 percent higher risk of developing depression by the end of the follow-up period, and people who had depression at the start of the study had a 58 percent higher risk of becoming obese. (18) The points in this article clearly show that in the elderly population, weight classification may not always be accurate, which is one of the difficulties encountered in older adults. This is the first hurdle encountered when trying to evaluate and treat this disease in the elderly. 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Credentials: Diets which are created or endorsed by medical professionals are more likely to provide good advice. This does not mean any diet endorsed by a professional is good but it does have a better chance of being healthy.
While it’s just as possible to reach your healthy weight at 60-something as it is when you were 20-something, it might take a little longer. You might not be able to push yourself as hard as you’d like to during workouts, leading to a lower calorie-burn than you used to hit. Or, you may not be as strong as you once were, prompting you to lift lighter weights (also lowering that calorie-burn number you see on your heart rate monitor). “Keep your focus on the healthy behaviors you’re adopting in order to achieve your goal, rather than your frustration if it’s not happening right away,” says Bowerman. If you stick to a healthy diet and exercise plan, “your weight will take care of itself over time.”
As discussed above, behavior plays a large role in obesity. Modifying those behaviors that may have contributed to developing obesity is one way to treat the disease. A few suggested behavior modifiers include:
Contributors: Svetlana Stajkovic and Jayna Holroyd-Leduc developed the concept of the review. Elizabeth Aitken conducted the literature search. All of the authors reviewed and critically appraised the literature cited in the manuscript. Svetlana Stajkovic drafted the article, and all of the authors revised the manuscript critically for important intellectual content and approved the final version submitted for publishing.
If you are Asian, your health may be at risk if you have a BMI of 27.5 or higher and you have unhealthy eating patterns and too little physical activity. Also, health problems are seen with a smaller waist size. In Asian women, a waist size of 32 in. (80 cm) or more raises the chance for disease. In Asian men, a waist size of 36 in. (90 cm) or more raises the chance for disease.2
Exercise and strength training can optimize overall health and quality of life. Lower impact activities such as walking, swimming, and bicycling are generally safe for many older adults, even those who have chronic conditions such as heart disease or high blood pressure. But the key is to start slowly. Warming up and cooling down by walking and stretching before and after each session is important to minimize any soreness or potential injury.
Poirier, P., al. “Obesity and Cardiovascular Disease: Pathophysiology, Evaluation and Effect of Weight Loss: An Update of the 1997 American Heart Association Scientific Statement on Obesity and Heart Disease from the Obesity Committee of the Council on Nutrition, Physical activity, and Metabolism.” Circulation 113.6 (2006): 898-918.
Most adolescents fall short of the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommendation of at least 60 minutes of aerobic physical activity each day. Only 18% of students in grades 9—12 met this recommendation in 2007. Daily, quality physical education in school can help students meet the guidelines, however, in 2009 only 33% had access to and attended daily physical education classes.
The area I found that’s most chockablock with commercial food options brackets the busy intersection of two main streets. However, like most areas I passed through nearby, this food scene was dominated not by fast-food restaurants but by bodegas (which, like most other types of convenience stores, are usually considered part of the low-income, food-desert landscape). I went into several of these mom-and-pop shops and saw pretty much the same thing in every one: A prominent display of extremely fatty-looking beef and pork, most of it fresh, though gigantic strips of fried pork skin often got pride of place. A lot of canned and boxed foods. Up front, shelves of candy and heavily processed snacks. A large set of display cases filled mostly with highly sugared beverages. And a small refrigerator case somewhere in the back sparsely populated with not-especially-fresh-looking fruits and vegetables. The bodega industry, too, seems to have plotted to addict communities to fat, sugar, and salt—unless, that is, they’re simply providing the foods that people like.
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Yet experts agree it’s important to focus on achieving your healthy weight no matter the number of candles on your birthday cake this year. “Excess fat is something we shouldn’t ignore no matter how old we are,” says Robert Huizenga, MD, the physician featured on The Biggest Loser. And while it can be tempting to throw in the towel, thinking you’re fighting an uphill battle at 60-something, compared with your 20- and 30-something counterparts, he has some interesting news: “There has actually been no difference in the amount or rate of weight loss in individuals of either sex who are over 60 years old versus those who are younger on the 17 seasons of the Biggest Loser show,” says Huizenga. So, while it might feel a little tougher (damn you, sore back), it is possible.
Munsell MF, Sprague BL, Berry DA, Chisholm G, Trentham-Dietz A. Body mass index and breast cancer risk according to postmenopausal estrogen-progestin use and hormone receptor status. Epidemiologic Reviews 2014; 36:114-136.
The definition of obesity varies depending on what one reads. In general, overweight and obesity indicate a weight greater than what is considered healthy. Obesity is a chronic condition defined by an excess amount of body fat. A certain amount of body fat is necessary for storing energy, heat insulation, shock absorption, and other functions.
During 12 years of follow-up, we observed 1035 incident CVD events and 1902 overall deaths. Obesity was associated with an increased risk of CVD among men (HR 1.57 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17, 2.11)) and women (HR 1.49 (95% CI 1.19, 1.86)), compared with normal weight individuals. Overweight and obesity were not associated with mortality in men and women without CVD. Among men with CVD, obesity compared with normal weight, was associated with a lower risk of mortality (HR 0.67 (95% CI 0.49, 0.90)). Overweight and obesity did not influence total life expectancy. However, obesity was associated with 2.6 fewer years (95% CI −4.8, −0.4) lived free from CVD in men and 1.9 (95% CI −3.3, −0.9) in women. Moreover, men and women with obesity lived 2.9 (95% CI 1.1, 4.8) and 1.7 (95% CI 0.6, 2.8) more years suffering from CVD compared with normal weight counterparts.
Obesity per se continues to contribute to mortality in advanced years. However, even if mortality is conceded to be unrelated to obesity at an older age, the unaffected risk of death remains, at best, an imperfect descriptive measure of a disease spread over multiple years of life. Obese, or overweight, older subjects with such presumed unimpaired longevity are nevertheless more likely to have hypertension and diabetes; develop coronary artery disease and possibly stroke; experience erectile dysfunction; suffer from accelerated loss of cognitive function, incontinence, frailty, osteoarthritis, and functional disability; and are dependent on others. The clustering of so many well-defined ailments resulting from, or associated with, obesity, particularly in older subjects, is impressive enough to view obesity as a real primary disease that requires attention and medical care.
Remember, these health benefits can occur independently (with or without) achieving weight loss. Before starting an exercise program, talk to a doctor about the type and intensity of the exercise program.
The prevalence of obesity in the United States is increasing in all age groups. During the past 30 years, the proportion of older adults who are obese has doubled. In this article the author describes the prevalence and causes of obesity among older adults as well as the consequences of obesity in older adults. Recommendations for interventions to address obesity are also provided. Differences between the two groups of older adults, those 50 to 65 years of age, and those over 65 years of age, will be addressed. The goal of the article is to raise nurses’ awareness of the challenges of obesity in older adults.
[3] Ogden C, Carroll MD, Lawman, HG, Fryar CD, Kruszon-Moran D, et al. Trends in obesity among children and adolescents in the United States, 1988- 1994 through 2013- 2014. The Journal of the American Medical Association. 2016;315(21):2292–2299. Available at http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2526638 or https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27272581.
Many explanations have been put forth for associations between BMI and social class. It is thought that in developed countries, the wealthy are able to afford more nutritious food, they are under greater social pressure to remain slim, and have more opportunities along with greater expectations for physical fitness. In undeveloped countries the ability to afford food, high energy expenditure with physical labor, and cultural values favoring a larger body size are believed to contribute to the observed patterns.[134] Attitudes toward body weight held by people in one’s life may also play a role in obesity. A correlation in BMI changes over time has been found among friends, siblings, and spouses.[136] Stress and perceived low social status appear to increase risk of obesity.[135][137][138]
Sleep apnea and respiratory problems – Sleep apnea, which causes people to stop breathing for brief periods, interrupts sleep throughout the night and causes sleepiness during the day. It also causes heavy snoring. Respiratory problems associated with obesity occur when added weight of the chest wall squeezes the lungs and causes restricted breathing. Sleep apnea is also associated with high blood pressure.
Karlson, E., Mandl, L., Aweh, G., Sangha, O., Liang, M., & Grodstein, F. (2003). Total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis: The importance of age, obesity, and other modifiable risk factors. American Journal of Medicine,114, 93-98.
Franco OH, Steyerberg EW, Hu FB, Mackenbach J, Nusselder W. Associations of diabetes mellitus with total life expectancy and life expectancy with and without cardiovascular disease. Arch Int Med 2007; 167: 1145–1151.
Overtaking the shadow of the slight senior is one of the obese senior — a result of a large elderly diabetic population, in addition to disability and other weight-related ailments. Families and senior living communities are increasingly overwhelmed — not to mention, unprepared — to care for this new trend of morbidly heavy seniors.
In an article published in JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), the authors said they found that regions in the brain that regulate appetite became active when people consumed glucose, but remained inactive when they ingested fructose. When those regions become active, they release hormones that produce feelings of satiety (fullness) – in other words, the hormones tell you to stop eating.
Much of the food isn’t all that different from what I can get in any other supermarket, but sprinkled throughout are items that scream “wholesome.” One that catches my eye today, sitting prominently on an impulse-buy rack near the checkout counter, is Vegan Cheesy Salad Booster, from Living Intentions, whose package emphasizes the fact that the food is enhanced with spirulina, chlorella, and sea vegetables. The label also proudly lets me know that the contents are raw—no processing!—and that they don’t contain any genetically modified ingredients. What the stuff does contain, though, is more than three times the fat content per ounce as the beef patty in a Big Mac (more than two-thirds of the calories come from fat), and four times the sodium.
Frail elderly people face different issues. “One concern for older people is getting enough protein,” Campbell says. “We need more as we age.” A lack of protein puts people at risk for lower immune function and osteoporosis.
People with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or higher are considered obese. The term “obesity” is used to describe the health condition of anyone significantly above his or her ideal healthy weight. Don’t be discouraged by the term. It simply means you are 20% or more above your ideal weight, and you are not alone.
Still, plenty of older adults can benefit from losing weight, particularly if they’re obese, have weight-related chronic conditions or a poor quality of life. “If a person is overweight, they [often] feel better if they’ve lost weight,” says Dr. James Powers, a geriatrician and professor in the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. “There’s less wear on the joints, greater endurance, greater ability to walk; to do normal activities without getting short of breath.”
We used to believe that high cholesterol was the number-one risk factor. But we must look at the whole picture. Having metabolic syndrome, appropriately called “diabesity” by Dr. Mark Hyman in his book The Blood Sugar Solution and also known as prediabetes, is a greater risk factor than having high cholesterol. In fact, it’s the number one risk factor of cardiovascular disease. (To read an interview with Dr. Hyman, see the May 2013 issue of Life Extension Magazine®.)
Meat is a concentrated form of calories that can pack on the pounds if not eaten in the right portions. Choosing one or more days a week to go vegetarian can help lower the caloric load of the day, giving your body a chance to burn off excess fat. When going vegetarian, don’t just substitute with cheese, which is equally rich in fat. Instead, opt for low calorie veggies like mushrooms or soy based tofu.
Diabetes does not occur without any warning signs. Before someone’s blood sugar raises to a diabetic level, they will first develop prediabetes, a condition where blood sugar is elevated, but not yet high enough to be considered diabetes. 86 million adults, or 37 percent of the adult population, have prediabetes. Prediabetes is largely influenced by weight and age, which, as described above, are both on the rise.
At the study’s outset, participants had evidence of frailty and impaired physical function based on their Physical Performance Test and on measures of their peak aerobic capacity using an exercise stress test and a questionnaire about their physical function.
Just wanted to post a heartfelt thanks to Doug for this fantastic site and all the work he does for seniors! Seriously overweight but otherwise healthy at 75, I ordered the DVD set and began on September 1, 2016. I started counting calories while eating healthy, and use the DVDs (rotating them) and my exercise bike almost every day. I have lost twenty pounds and many inches, but this has also beneficially affected my sleep, my digestion, and my relationships. Yes, I get sore, but follow his suggestions about that; I look on my soreness as a badge of honor when it happens! I feel so much stronger, so much more flexible, and so proud of myself that the weight loss is just an added bonus, not the primary goal anymore. Doug is a wonderful person and deserves our thanks!