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Urinary incontinence, the unintentional leakage of urine. Chronic obesity can weaken pelvic muscles, making it harder to maintain bladder control. While it can happen to both sexes, it usually affects women as they age.
Waist circumference is another widely used measurement to determine abdominal fat content. An excess of abdominal fat, when out of proportion to total body fat, is considered a predictor of risk factors related to obesity. Men with a waist measurement exceeding 40 inches are considered at risk. Women are at risk with a waist measurement of 35 inches or greater.
Keep moving. Even though regular aerobic exercise is the most efficient way to burn calories and shed excess weight, any extra movement helps burn calories. Making simple changes throughout your day can add up to big benefits. Park farther from store entrances, rev up your household chores, garden, get up and move around periodically, and wear a pedometer to track how many steps you actually take over the course of a day.
Saxenda was approved in late 2014 as a weight-loss drug in combination with physical activity and diet modifications. It is a once-a-day injection (not a pill) that mimics a hormone related to digestion and appetite control (GLP-1) that is used in the management of type 2 diabetes. It activates areas of the brain involved in appetite regulation.
3. Gilmore SA, Robinson G, Posthauer ME, et al. Clinical indicators associated with unintentional weight loss and pressure ulcers in elderly residents of nursing facilities. J Am Diet Assoc 1995;95:984–92 [PubMed]
Measuring waist circumference helps screen for possible health risks that come with overweight and obesity. If most of your fat is around your waist rather than at your hips, you’re at a higher risk for heart disease and type 2 diabetes. This risk goes up with a waist size that is greater than 35 inches for women or greater than 40 inches for men. To correctly measure your waist, stand and place a tape measure around your middle, just above your hipbones. Measure your waist just after you breathe out.
In the past few years the number of older adults who are obese has doubled, with more than 15% of the older adult population now classified as obese. More specifically, it is estimated that the prevalence of obesity in adults ages 50 to 69 is 22.9%; for adults over age 70, the obesity rate is 15%.
A third approach to obesity treatment involves research into the social factors that encourage or reinforce weight gain in humans. Researchers are looking at such issues as the advertising and marketing of food products; media stereotypes of obesity; the development of eating disorders in adolescents and adults; and similar questions.
Getting the correct ratios of protein, carbohydrates, and good-quality fats can help in weight loss via enhancement of the metabolism. Support groups that are informed about healthy, nutritious, and balanced diets can offer an individual the support he or she needs to maintain this type of eating regimen.
Depending on the breed, when your dog is seven years or older, he may be considered a senior. With old age comes a variety of issues that can have negative effects on your dog’s health. Unplanned weight gain in senior dogs is one of the more common issues, and as your old dog becomes more overweight, this can lead to a large number of other related health problems.
American Obesity Association: This group itself is not for profit, but it is made up of several types of sponsors, including professional groups such as the American College of Nutrition as well as health-insurance interests, for-profit companies such as drug and biotechnology companies, and weight-loss interests such as Jenny Craig, Inc., and Weight Watchers, Inc. The group’s purpose is to change the way obesity is perceived and to end discrimination against obese people, as well as to find more effective strategies for preventing and “curing” obesity. It uses lobbying, advocacy, and education to achieve these goals.
I’m not picking out rare, less healthy examples from these establishments. Check out their menus online: fat, sugar, and other refined carbs abound. (Café Gratitude says it uses only “healthy” fats and natural sweeteners; Akasha says its focus is not on “health food” but on “farm to fork” fare.) In fact, because the products and dishes offered by these types of establishments tend to emphasize the healthy-sounding foods they contain, I find it much harder to navigate through them to foods that go easy on the oil, butter, refined grains, rice, potatoes, and sugar than I do at far less wholesome restaurants. (These dishes also tend to contain plenty of sea salt, which Pollanites hold up as the wholesome alternative to the addictive salt engineered by the food industry, though your body can’t tell the difference.)
Beers, Mark H., MD, and Robert Berkow, MD, editors. “Nutritional Disorders: Obesity.” Section 1, Chapter 5. In The Merck Manual of Diagnosis and Therapy. Whitehouse Station, NJ: Merck Research Laboratories, 2004.
During pregnancy, women gain weight so that their babies get proper nourishment and develop normally. After giving birth, some women find it hard to lose the weight. This may lead to obesity, especially after a few pregnancies.
On further questioning, the patient admits that even though she had been eating three meals per day, she eats less at each meal than previously. She tells you that her husband of 50 years died 10 months ago. She reports her mood is fine but that she still has not gotten over his death. She feels lonely and is finding it difficult to motivate herself to prepare adequate meals for only one person. She also reports experiencing nausea and some difficulty chewing over the past month. You take a closer look in her mouth and notice that her dentures are loose and that there are a few small ulcers on her hard palate.
This fact sheet tells you more about the links between excess weight and many health conditions. It also explains how reaching and maintaining a normal weight may help you and your loved ones stay healthier as you grow older.

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Children grow at different rates at different times, so it is not always easy to tell if a child is overweight. The CDC BMI growth charts are used to compare a child’s BMI with other children of the same sex and age. It is important that a child’s health care provider evaluates a child’s BMI, growth, and potential health risks due to excess body weight. An online tool for gauging the BMIs of children and teens can be found at: https://nccd.cdc.gov/dnpabmi/Calculator.aspx
Villareal DT, Miller BV, III, Banks M, Fontana L, Sinacore DR, Klein S. Effect of lifestyle intervention on metabolic coronary heart disease risk factors in obese older adults. Am J Clin Nutr. 2006b;84:1317–1323. [PubMed]
The true impact of overweight and obesity on mortality may be obscured by confounding factors. For example, reverse causation induced by preexisting chronic disease and inadequate control for smoking status can mask the effect of obesity through the excessive death risk caused by these low BMI–associated conditions. In some distinct diseases of the elderly, such as Alzheimer’s disease (8) or Parkinsonism (9), weight loss may precede the time of diagnosis by years, thus causing further false overrepresentation of morbidity and mortality in the low weight range.
Because researchers often treat baby boomers of color as belonging to one group, quality data on the individual status of specific racial populations is lacking, leading to insufficiently designed programs, policies, and services. The absence of data is a testament to the invisibility of baby boomers of color in society and deeply affects the practice of social work and other helping professions that require culturally sensitive approaches. Melvin Delgado rectifies this injustice by providing a comprehensive portrait of the status and unique assets of boomers of color. Using specific data, he grounds an understanding of boomersÕfinancial, medical, and emotional needs within a historical, socioeconomic, cultural, and political context, resulting in tailored recommendations for meeting the challenges of a growing population. His research focuses on African American, Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander, and Native American older adults and addresses issues of financial security, employment stability, housing, and health care, which are often complicated by linguistic and cultural differences. Rather than treat baby boomers of color as a financial burden on society and its resources, Delgado recognizes their strengths and positive contributions to families and communities, resulting in an affirming and empowering approach to service.
Adding to the problem is the fact that baby boomers weren’t raised with deprivation. To the contrary, an abundance of food – frozen food, canned food, soft drinks and snack food – filled many boomers’ childhood kitchens. The generation embraced fast food culture in their teens and 20s. The question for many of them now, in their 50s and 60s, is why they’re still eating like kids.
Strolling through a Chilean supermarket can be visually jarring. Boxes of Nesquik chocolate powder no longer include Nestle’s hyperkinetic bunny. Gone, too, are the dancing candies that enliven packages of M&Ms the world over.
More recently, investigators conducted a systematic review of 89 studies on weight-related diseases and then did a statistical summary, or meta-analysis, of the data. Of the 18 weight-related diseases they studied, diabetes was at the top of the risk list: Compared with men and women in the normal weight range (BMI lower than 25), men with BMIs of 30 or higher had a sevenfold higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, and women with BMIs of 30 or higher had a 12-fold higher risk. (4)
Treatment of obesity depends primarily on how overweight a person is and his or her overall health. However, to be successful, any treatment must affect life-long behavioral changes rather than short-term weight loss. “Yo-yo” dieting, in which weight is repeatedly lost and regained, has been shown to increase a person’s likelihood of developing fatal health problems than if the weight had been lost gradually or not lost at all. Behavior-focused treatment should concentrate on:
Villareal DT, Chode S, Parimi N, Sinacore DR, Hilton T, Armamento-Villareal R, Napoli N, Qualls C, Shah K. Weight loss, exercise, or both and physical function in obese older adults. N Engl J Med. 2011a;364:1218–1229. [PMC free article] [PubMed]
The role of physical activity cannot be overstated when it comes to weight loss. For sedentary seniors moving toward more active lifestyles, starting small can help prevent injuries while avoiding burnout. Also essential? Choosing a program that you can actually stick with. This means honestly assessing your own physical capabilities and adopting a can-do attitude.
24. Yeh SS, Hafner A, Chang CK, et al. Risk factors relating blood markers of inflammation and nutritional status to survival in cachectic geriatric patients in a randomized clinical trial. J Am Geriatr Soc 2004;52:1708–12 [PubMed]
The prevalence of obesity in the United States is increasing in all age groups. During the past 30 years, the proportion of older adults who are obese has doubled. In this article the author describes the prevalence and causes of obesity among older adults as well as the consequences of obesity in older adults. Recommendations for interventions to address obesity are also provided. Differences between the two groups of older adults, those 50 to 65 years of age, and those over 65 years of age, will be addressed. The goal of the article is to raise nurses’ awareness of the challenges of obesity in older adults.
Thus McDonald’s silence on the nutritional profiles of its new menu items. “We’re not making any health claims,” Watson said. “We’re just saying it’s new, it tastes great, come on in and enjoy it. Maybe once the product is well seated with customers, we’ll change that message.” If customers learn that they can eat healthier foods at McDonald’s without even realizing it, he added, they’ll be more likely to try healthier foods there than at other restaurants. The same reasoning presumably explains why the promotions and ads for the Carl’s Jr. grilled-cod sandwich offer not a word related to healthfulness, and why there wasn’t a whiff of health cheerleading surrounding the turkey burger brought out earlier this year by Burger King (which is not yet calling the sandwich a permanent addition).
Sexual function may also be affected by obesity. Data from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, (26) the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), (27) and the Massachusetts Male Aging Study (28) indicate that the odds of developing erectile dysfunction increase with increasing BMI. Of note, weight loss appears to be mildly helpful in maintaining erectile function. (29) The effect of obesity on female sexual function is less clear. In a recent French study, obese women were less likely than normal-weight women to report having had a sexual partner in the preceding 12 months, but the prevalence of sexual dysfunction was similar in both groups. (30) In a smaller survey of 118 women, Esposito and colleagues found that obese women had lower scores on the Female Sexual Function Index, with strong correlations between increasing BMI and problems with arousal, lubrication, orgasm, and satisfaction. (31)
A 2006 review identified ten other possible contributors to the recent increase of obesity: (1) insufficient sleep, (2) endocrine disruptors (environmental pollutants that interfere with lipid metabolism), (3) decreased variability in ambient temperature, (4) decreased rates of smoking, because smoking suppresses appetite, (5) increased use of medications that can cause weight gain (e.g., atypical antipsychotics), (6) proportional increases in ethnic and age groups that tend to be heavier, (7) pregnancy at a later age (which may cause susceptibility to obesity in children), (8) epigenetic risk factors passed on generationally, (9) natural selection for higher BMI, and (10) assortative mating to increased concentration of obesity risk factors (this would increase the number of obese people by increasing population variance in weight).[85] While there is evidence supporting the influence of these mechanisms on the increased prevalence of obesity, the evidence is still inconclusive, and the authors state that these are probably less influential than the ones discussed in the previous paragraph.
Exercises For KneesExercises For Knee InjuriesKnee Injury WorkoutExercises For Arthritic KneesNon Weight Bearing ExercisesBad Knee ExercisesInner Thigh StretchesPilates Ring ExercisesExercises For Love Handles
Modugno says she is sympathetic to the government’s concerns about widespread fraud — that just about everyone in the weight loss and fitness world wanted to be able to bill Medicare for obesity counseling. But she says doctors should be allowed to refer their patients to registered dieticians like her. “Unless we change the nature of how this occurs, how the counseling occurs, I don’t see it being available to people in a meaningful way,” says Modugno.
High blood pressure is linked to overweight and obesity in several ways. Having a large body size may increase blood pressure because your heart needs to pump harder to supply blood to all your cells. Excess fat may also damage your kidneys, which help regulate blood pressure. 
Scoring: 0 to 2 points = You have good nutrition; recheck your nutritional score in six months. 3 to 5 points = You are at moderate nutritional risk, and you should see what you can do to improve your eating habits and lifestyle; recheck your nutritional score in three months. 6 or more points = You are at high nutritional risk, and you should bring this checklist with you the next time you see your physician, dietitian, or other qualified health care professional; talk with any of these professionals about the problems you may have, and ask for help to improve your nutritional status.
Ask your vet for an opinion about your dog’s weight if you’re unsure. But it’s easy to learn how to assess a healthy weight in your dog yourself – if you can’t easily feel your dog’s ribs and shoulder blades, if she has no waist or if there’s a roll of fat at the base of her tail, it is time to face reality and start your dog on a diet.
Federal Dietary Guidelines for Americans. We continue to provide medical, nutritional, and other scientific expertise to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) that publish the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans with information about the latest science-based nutritional recommendations.
^ Jump up to: a b Flegal KM, Ogden CL, Wei R, Kuczmarski RL, Johnson CL (June 2001). “Prevalence of overweight in US children: comparison of US growth charts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention with other reference values for body mass index”. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 73 (6): 1086–93. PMID 11382664.
According to Jesse Slome, executive director of the American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance, a  baby boomer is somebody born between 1946 and about 1965.  “Boomers make up almost one in five U.S. citizens and have a significant impact on the economy,” Slome explains.  “Their impact of health care and long-term care costs could be more than this nation can bear.”
“Job strain occurs when people experience high demands and low control in their jobs. My research has shown that females are more likely to experience this type of work stress, and Gen X has a significantly higher risk. This is a concern given the known association between high job strain, coronary heart disease, metabolic syndrome, obesity, and type 2 diabetes,” she says.
Researchers found that 20% of people born between 1966 and 1985 were obese in their 20s, an obesity prevalence milestone not reached by their parents until their 30s or by their grandparents until their 40s or 50s.
Jump up ^ WHO Expert, Consultation (Jan 10, 2004). “Appropriate body-mass index for Asian populations and its implications for policy and intervention strategies”. Lancet. 363 (9403): 157–63. doi:10.1016/s0140-6736(03)15268-3. PMID 14726171.
Our model is designed to provide comfort, practical fitness, small group training and healthy, everyday meals. The goal is to provide a lifestyle you can replicate and maintain after you return home – without spending exorbitant amounts of money.
You may be able to make progress in weight loss for seniors and achieving your ideal weight by consuming the ideal number of calories. According to health.gov, the total number of calories a person needs per day varies depending on age, sex, height, weight and physical activity. Due to a decrease in basal metabolic rates that happen as someone ages, caloric needs also generally decrease for adults as they age.
Exercise and strength training can optimize overall health and quality of life. Lower impact activities such as walking, swimming, and bicycling are generally safe for many older adults, even those who have chronic conditions such as heart disease or high blood pressure. But the key is to start slowly. Warming up and cooling down by walking and stretching before and after each session is important to minimize any soreness or potential injury.

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Federal dietary guidelines and the MyPlate website recommend many tips for healthy eating that may also help you control your weight (see the Additional Links section for hyperlinks). Here are a few examples:
Asthma is a condition in which hyperreactive airways constrict and result in symptoms like wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath. Causes of asthma include genetics, environmental factors, personal history of allergies, and other factors. Asthma is diagnosed by a physician based on a patient’s family history and results from lung function tests and other exams. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and long-acting bronchodilators (LABAs) are used in the treatment of asthma. Generally, the prognosis for a patient with asthma is good. Exposure to allergens found on farms may protect against asthma symptoms.
Lead researcher, Racher Batterham, explained that people who carry the FTO gene variant tend to eat too much, prefer high-energy, fatty foods, and are usually obese. They also appear to take much longer to reach satiety (feeling of being full).
The study also ranked states on the health of their current senior populations. Massachusetts topped the list, jumping to No. 1 from the No. 6 ranking it had the last time the rankings were calculated. Vermont slipped to No. 2.
Patricia Rockwood has been a professional copy editor and writer for more than 25 years. She is an avid gardener with a certified Florida backyard habitat. Rockwood has practiced yoga for more than 40 years and taught for much of that time. She is also a professional mosaic artist.
Including calisthenic exercises such as sit-ups, push-ups, and pull-ups is an option, but excess bodyweight significantly limits the number of repetitions that overweight or obese clients can perform. Therefore, these activities may limit improvement and be embarrassing for them to attempt. Designing programs that include the use of machines or free-weight equipment may avoid this problem, because resistance loads can be easily adjusted to match each client’s strength level. For example, the free-weight bench press works the same muscles as push-ups do, and the weight-assisted chin and dip machine is nearly identical to pull-ups in its effect on the muscles worked. Although your client may not have the strength to complete push-ups or pull-ups, load assignments in the bench press and weight-assisted chin and dip machine, respectively, can be reduced enough to enable him or her to perform the 8 to 12 reps recommended in chapter 4.
Regular exercise. To effectively lose weight, most people need to do moderate intensity exercise for 60 minutes most days of the week. Add more activity during the day. Take the stairs and get up often from your desk or sofa.
A slew of start-ups are trying to find ways of producing fresh, local, unprocessed meals quickly and at lower cost. But could this food eventually be sold as cheaply, conveniently, and ubiquitously as today’s junky fast food? Not even according to Bittman, who explored the question in a recent New York Times Magazine article. Even if wholesome food caught on with the public at large, including the obese population, and even if poor and working-class people were willing to pay a premium for it, how long would it take to scale up from a handful of shops to the tens of thousands required to begin making a dent in the obesity crisis? How long would it take to create the thousands of local farms we’d need in order to provide these shops with fresh, unprocessed ingredients, even in cities?
Data Sources: A PubMed search was completed in Clinical Queries. Key terms: unintentional, involuntary, weight loss, geriatric, elderly, appetite stimulants, cachexia/drug therapy, and nutrition. The search included meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, clinical trials, and reviews. Also searched were Essential Evidence Plus, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality evidence reports, Clinical Evidence, Google Scholar, and the Cochrane database. References from those sources were also searched. Search dates: January 2012 and March 2014.
Boomers have a lot to gain by losing a little. Many already have obesity-related health conditions, such as diabetes or high blood pressure. Recent research indicates that an average reduction of 3.74 pounds (1.7 kilograms) per person would result in 178,000 fewer cases of coronary heart disease and 890,000 fewer diabetics [source: Goodwin].
Baby Boomers now is the time to address this critical issue. We must deal with this NOW if we are to continue to serve are parents and not be a burden on our children. Even as important is our quality of and our ability to continue to be self-sufficient.

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Cornish J, Callon KE, Bava U, Lin C, Naot D, Hill BL, Grey AB, Broom N, Myers DE, Nicholson GC, Reid IR. Leptin directly regulates bone cell function in vitro and reduces bone fragility in vivo. J Endocrinol. 2002;175:405–415. [PubMed]
acculturation addressed Administration on Aging adults of color African Americans ageism Alzheimer’s disease Asian assets perspective associated baby boom baby boomers benefits boom boomer assets boomers and older boomers of color capital caregivers Centers for Disease challenges chapter civic engagement cohort concept consequences context contributions Control and Prevention cultural assets culturally competent debate deficit perspective Delgado demographic Disease Control economic efforts enter older adulthood enter retirement equity estimated example expected face factors focus formal funds future grandparents health disparities helping professions highlight immigrants impact important income increase individuals intergenerational equity interventions Latino Latino/as lives low-income Medicare ment Meschede million nation needs non-Latino/a older adults particularly pension play political potential practice programs projected rates reform result retirement age role significant sixty-five social justice Social Security social workers society stress tion U.S. Census Bureau understanding volunteering well-being White
Unfortunately, it’s common to regain weight no matter what obesity treatment methods you try. If you take weight-loss medications, you’ll probably regain weight when you stop taking them. You might even regain weight after weight-loss surgery if you continue to overeat or overindulge in high-calorie foods. But that doesn’t mean your weight-loss efforts are futile.
Poirier, P., et al. “Obesity and Cardiovascular Disease: Pathophysiology, Evaluation and Effect of Weight Loss: An Update of the 1997 American Heart Association Scientific Statement on Obesity and Heart Disease from the Obesity Committee of the Council on Nutrition, Physical activity, and Metabolism.” Circulation 113.6 (2006): 898-918.
For example, today’s regular staff may have trouble helping and lifting obese residents, and often do not know how to use the specialized equipment. Overweight patients confined to their beds also require staff to reposition the resident’s body so that bed sores are not developed. Unfortunately it also takes more staff members to aid an obese patient than a regular patient, and this additional care costs money and makes little business sense for communities.
Specific industries, such as the airline, healthcare and food industries, have special concerns. Due to rising rates of obesity, airlines face higher fuel costs and pressures to increase seating width.[213] In 2000, the extra weight of obese passengers cost airlines US$275 million.[214] The healthcare industry has had to invest in special facilities for handling severely obese patients, including special lifting equipment and bariatric ambulances.[215] Costs for restaurants are increased by litigation accusing them of causing obesity.[216] In 2005 the US Congress discussed legislation to prevent civil lawsuits against the food industry in relation to obesity; however, it did not become law.[216]
“There are not many studies of weight loss among the elderly. It’s a rich and fertile area,” says Dr. Adam Bernstein, research director at the Cleveland Clinic’s Wellness Institute. “The prescription would not be the same for a middle-aged person or youth.” Bernstein, who was not in the report, says it is possible for older men and women to lose weight, though doctors are likely to immediately focus on the consequences of excess body fat, like high blood pressure and erratic blood sugar. “If the clinician makes the determination a person is overweight and no other comorbid conditions, then what seems appropriate is a diet and exercise plan,” he says.
If you are at risk for type 2 diabetes, losing weight may help prevent or delay the onset of diabetes. If you have type 2 diabetes, losing weight and becoming more physically active can help you control your blood sugar levels and prevent or delay health problems. Losing weight and exercising more may also allow you to reduce the amount of diabetes medicine you take.
Obesity is best defined by using the body mass index. The body mass index is calculated using a person’s height and weight. The body mass index (BMI) equals a person’s weight in kilograms (kg) divided by their height in meters (m) squared. Since BMI describes body weight relative to height, it is strongly correlated with total body fat content in adults. An adult who has a BMI of 25-29.9 is considered overweight, and an adult who has a BMI over 30 is considered obese. A BMI of 18.5-24.9 is considered normal weight.
“We think it’s the perfect storm of several factors,” says Dr. Scott Kahan, an obesity medicine specialist at George Washington University. Kahan says obese patients and doctors aren’t aware of the benefit, and doctors who want to intervene are often reluctant to do so.
“With this new study, we will be able to discern whether a shift in disability is due to a change in physical or cognitive capacity or to changes in the accommodations people make,” explained Freedman. The accommodations measured include behavior changes (such as bathing less often), asking someone for help, and using assistive devices and home modifications (a bath seat, for example). Among the goals, she said, is to identify the ways people adapt to disabilities that allow them to remain independent as long as possible.
Be wary of quick fixes. You may be tempted by fad diets that promise fast and easy weight loss. The reality, however, is that there are no magic foods or quick fixes. Fad diets may help in the short term, but the long-term results don’t appear to be any better than other diets.
Jump up ^ Diercks DB, Roe MT, Mulgund J, Pollack CV, Kirk JD, Gibler WB, Ohman EM, Smith SC, Boden WE, Peterson ED (July 2006). “The obesity paradox in non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes: Results from the Can Rapid risk stratification of Unstable angina patients Suppress ADverse outcomes with Early implementation of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Guidelines Quality Improvement Initiative”. Am Heart J (Research Support). 152 (1): 140–48. doi:10.1016/j.ahj.2005.09.024. PMID 16824844.
When my father’s final hour came, Wilhelm says, “I kissed my father on the cheek and told him I loved him. He grunted so I knew he heard me.” Saying goodbye, she says, was heartbreaking, especially knowing that there may have been more doctors could have done to help her father (at least before the cancer had spread).
Karlson, E., Mandl, L., Aweh, G., Sangha, O., Liang, M., & Grodstein, F. (2003). Total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis: The importance of age, obesity, and other modifiable risk factors. American Journal of Medicine,114, 93-98.
The body mass index (BMI) is a statistical measurement derived from your height and weight. Although it is considered to be a useful way to estimate healthy body weight, it does not measure the percentage of body fat. The BMI measurement can sometimes be misleading – a muscleman may have a high BMI but have much less fat than an unfit person whose BMI is lower. However, in general, the BMI measurement can be a useful indicator for the ‘average person’.
Overweight and obesity, as well as their related noncommunicable diseases, are largely preventable. Supportive environments and communities are fundamental in shaping people’s choices, by making the choice of healthier foods and regular physical activity the easiest choice (the choice that is the most accessible, available and affordable), and therefore preventing overweight and obesity.
Researchers at the University of Adelaide have confirmed that if current trends continue, Australia’s Generation X will overtake Baby Boomers for poor health, including rates of obesity and diabetes, which could have huge implications for healthcare and the workforce.
Of special interest to women who have gained weight after having a baby is the fact that breastfeeding helps you shed some extra pounds. Besides the positive effects for the baby, breastfeeding burns approximately 500 extra calories each day.
This article has presented formal programs nurses can use to help patients manage their weight along with general considerations to facilitate weight loss safely in older adults who are obese. As trusted and respected healthcare professionals, it is time for nurses to take the lead in combating the obesity epidemic.
One study even found that adults between ages 60 and 74 were four times more likely to be depressed if they were obese [source: Pappas]. And obesity and aging joints is not a good mix, meaning that creaking knees will suffer more wear and tear when holding up someone who enjoys an extra trip back to the buffet table.
My husband and I went there and stayed for 4 weeks. We are both in our early 70’s and were not what I would consider to be in “working out condition”. The owners were so kind and sweet and they went out of their way to modify the program for us and to set aside time and activities outside of their standard clients.
Puhl R., Henderson K., and Brownell K. Social consequences of obesity In:Peter G. Kopelman; Ian D. Caterson; Michael J. Stock; William H. Dietz (2005). Clinical obesity in adults and children: In Adults and Children. Blackwell Publishing. pp. 29–45. ISBN 1-4051-1672-2.
Including calisthenic exercises such as sit-ups, push-ups, and pull-ups is an option, but excess bodyweight significantly limits the number of repetitions that overweight or obese clients can perform. Therefore, these activities may limit improvement and be embarrassing for them to attempt. Designing programs that include the use of machines or free-weight equipment may avoid this problem, because resistance loads can be easily adjusted to match each client’s strength level. For example, the free-weight bench press works the same muscles as push-ups do, and the weight-assisted chin and dip machine is nearly identical to pull-ups in its effect on the muscles worked. Although your client may not have the strength to complete push-ups or pull-ups, load assignments in the bench press and weight-assisted chin and dip machine, respectively, can be reduced enough to enable him or her to perform the 8 to 12 reps recommended in chapter 4.
Recent statistics have initially confirmed this grim health trend. A survey sponsored by the National Institute on Aging examined the health status of 20,000 baby boomers between 51 and 56. Stacked up against the previous generation during the same age bracket, baby boomers lagged behind. The younger set actually reported the most consistent pain and chronic health conditions [source: National Institute on Aging]. Even with low-impact activities of climbing stairs, getting up from a chair and lifting their arms over their heads, baby boomers reported less mobility than their predecessors [source: The Washington Post]. In addition, boomers have a higher prevalence of alcoholism and psychiatric problems [source: Soldo et al].
This is because the boomer generation continues to be large in numbers with behaviors that are still too unsustainable. The reality is that sustainability for our economy, human health and environment cannot be achieved without boomer generation engagement. What every millennial must do is engage the boomer generation to help them adopt sustainable life choices.
Waist circumference is a less-common method used to measure obesity in an individual. This simple measurement indicates obesity and morbid obesity in adults by measuring your waist. To find your waist circumference, wrap a tape measure around the area above your hip bone and below your rib cage.
Moderate intensity aerobic exercise, 30 minutes a day, five times per week is currently recommended for adults ages 65 and older, according to the guidelines presented by the American College Sports of Medicine (ACSM). Those who are not used to exercising can start out with a shorter duration at a lower intensity and work up to the recommendations.
Jump up ^ Poirier P, Giles TD, Bray GA, Hong Y, Stern JS, Pi-Sunyer FX, Eckel RH (May 2006). “Obesity and cardiovascular disease: pathophysiology, evaluation, and effect of weight loss”. Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol. (Review). 26 (5): 968–76. doi:10.1161/01.ATV.0000216787.85457.f3. PMID 16627822.
“Given the link between positive healthy lifestyles and subsequent health in this age group, the present study demonstrates a clear need for policies that expand efforts at prevention and healthy lifestyle promotion in the baby boomer generation,” the study concluded.

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Gastric bypass surgery. A small part of the stomach is connected to the middle part of the intestine, bypassing the first part of intestine. This decreases the amount of food that you can eat and the amount of fat your body can take in and store.
It is important to make a solid commitment to changing a behavior or lifestyle. Involve your family and/or friends and ask them to help you make the necessary changes to positively impact your health.
It’s hard to change habits. You have to be ready. Make sure this is the right time for you. Are you ready to make a plan and stay on it? Do you have the support of your family and friends? Do you know what your first steps will be? Becoming healthier and staying that way is a lifelong effort.
There is some debate, however, about whether it’s good for elderly people to lose weight, even if they are obese. Some studies have found an association between weight loss in seniors and mortality risk, but Villareal says many of those studies did not distinguish between voluntary weight loss and involuntary weight loss that may be related to illness.
It’s a nationwide epidemic. It impacts all of us, and seniors are no exception! A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association reported that seven out of ten adults over the age of 60 are either overweight or obese. Additionally, Type-II diabetes rates have doubled over the last fifteen years…and are highest amongst the elderly population.
*Results based on an aggregate of telephone interviews with 2,006 American adults, aged 18 and older, conducted from 2000 through 2002. For results based on the total sample, one can say with 95% confidence that the maximum margin of sampling error is ±2.4%.
The body mass index (BMI) is a statistical measurement derived from your height and weight. Although it is considered to be a useful way to estimate healthy body weight, it does not measure the percentage of body fat. The BMI measurement can sometimes be misleading – a muscleman may have a high BMI but have much less fat than an unfit person whose BMI is lower. However, in general, the BMI measurement can be a useful indicator for the ‘average person’.
Before selecting a medication for you, your doctor will consider your health history, as well as possible side effects. Some weight-loss medications can’t be used by women who are pregnant, or people who take certain medications or have chronic health conditions.
Diabetes: Type 2 diabetes was once called adult-onset diabetes. Now with the rise in childhood obesity, there is a dramatic rise in the number of children suffering from type 2 diabetes. Untreated, this can be a life-threatening condition.
“About half of people 20 years ago said they exercised regularly, which meant three times a week, and that rate now is only about 18 percent,” King told NPR. “That’s an astonishing change in just one generation.”
Villareal DT, Chode S. Parimi N, Sinacore DR, Hilton T, Armamento-Villareal R, Napoli N, Qualls C, Shah K. Weight loss, exercise or both and physical function in obese older adults, The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 364(13), pp. 1218-1229. March 31, 2011.
Jump up ^ Johnston, Bradley C.; Kanters, Steve; Bandayrel, Kristofer; Wu, Ping; Naji, Faysal; Siemieniuk, Reed A.; Ball, Geoff D. C.; Busse, Jason W.; Thorlund, Kristian; Guyatt, Gordon; Jansen, Jeroen P.; Mills, Edward J. (3 September 2014). “Comparison of Weight Loss Among Named Diet Programs in Overweight and Obese Adults”. JAMA. 312 (9): 923–33. doi:10.1001/jama.2014.10397. PMID 25182101.
Glass, Rasmussen, and Schwartz (2006) did investigate whether neighborhood psychosocial hazards, defined as “stable and visible features of neighborhood environments that give rise to a heightened state of vigilance, alarm, or fear in residents” (p. 4), independent of individual risk factors, were associated with the increased odds of obesity in older adults. After analyzing data from a cohort study of 1140 randomly selected community dwelling men and women who were 50 to 70 years of age, they found that 38% were obese. Residents living in the more hazardous neighborhoods were more than twice as likely to be obese as those living in the least-hazardous neighborhoods, even after controlling for behavioral and socioeconomic individual-level risk factors. The authors concluded that this significant finding demonstrates that neighborhood conditions can alter patterns of obesity. Community-level interventions that might lead to a reduction in environmental and sociological hazards include increasing educational attainment, increasing public safety, reducing crime rates, and eliminating vacant housing.  
Likewise, increasing your activity level is largely a matter of changing your attitude. You don’t have to become a marathon runner. Thirty minutes of aerobic activity five days a week will make a significant difference in your health. Look for ways to increase your activity level doing things you enjoy.
Kelly et al. (2011) recruited 28 sedentary, obese adults who were weight stable for the previous six months. The group was randomly allocated to exercise plus either a low-glycemic index (LGI) or high-glycemic index (HGI) diet. Participants engaged in five exercise sessions per week for 60 minutes at 85% maximum heart rate. All food was provided and balanced for macronutrients and both groups lost similar amounts of weight over the six month intervention. Weight, FM, FFM, truncal fat, fasting plasma glucose and insulin decreased in both groups, but did not differ between groups. Glycemic response reduced only in the LGI group. Plasma and mononuclear cells (MNC)-derived TNFα reduced in the LGI group, but increased in the HGI group. Secretion of IL-6 from MNC and plasma IL-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) was reduced in the LGI group. Change in MNC-derived TNFα and plasma MCP-1 correlated with decreased glycemic response. It was concluded that a LGI diet plus exercise decreased inflammatory markers, whereas a HGI diet attenuated improvements in glycemia and inflammation that usually occur with exercise. One proposed mechanism was the production of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), which results in reactive oxygen species that activates the NFkB pathway, and increases TNF-α (Mohanty 2000; Evans 2002; Ghanim 2004). Hypertrophied adipocytes in obesity are partially responsible for the secretion of IL-6, and are thus regulated by not only weight loss, but also hyperglycemia and physical activity. The decrease of MCP-1 in the LGI group associated with changes in plasma glucose was attributed to reduced stimulus to recruit MNC into adipose tissue, seen as improved glucose tolerance. This implies an improvement in adipose tissue function, and the investigators concluded that eating a LGI diet in combination with aerobic exercise can reverse the effects of obesity on proinflammatory cytokines, which appears independent of weight loss.
A diet high in simple carbohydrates. The role of carbohydrates in weight gain is not clear. Carbohydrates increase blood glucose levels, which in turn stimulate insulin release by the pancreas, and insulin promotes the growth of fat tissue and can cause weight gain. Some scientists believe that simple carbohydrates (sugars, fructose, desserts, soft drinks, beer, wine, etc.) contribute to weight gain because they are more rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream than complex carbohydrates (pasta, brown rice, grains, vegetables, raw fruits, etc.) and thus cause a more pronounced insulin release after meals than complex carbohydrates. This higher insulin release, scientists believe, contributes to weight gain.
Weight loss through calorie reduction or exercise is generally good for most people as an intervention in obesity, although the appropriateness of these methods has historically been a matter of controversy in older adults who are overweight.
The third paper, Shah et al. (2011), focused on bone loss measuring C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) as a marker of bone resorption, and osteocalcin and N-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen as a markers of bone formation. Bone-active hormones, serum estradiol, IGF-1, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and serum PTH concentration were also obtained. Serum C-terminal telopeptide (CTX) and osteocalcin increased in the diet group, with bone resorption increasing more than bone formation. Both of these markers decreased in the exercise and control groups. Osteocalcin did not change with the combination of diet and exercise. Serum leptin and estradiol concentrations decreased more markedly in diet plus exercise than in diet alone (−38% and −13%, respectively). It was suggested that the decrease in leptin with weight loss could stimulate the receptor activator of NF-κB ligand and the receptor activator of NF-κB pathway leading to increased bone resorption and bone loss (Burguera 2001; Thomas 2002). There was no decrease in IGF-1 with weight loss and this was attributed to adequate protein intake during weight loss. Change in mechanical stress was cited as the mechanism behind BMD loss in the hip, but not in the spine or whole body. The most important finding was that in these obese older adults supplemented with calcium and vitamin D, exercise training added to weight loss offset increased bone turnover and loss of BMD. This was supported by changes in lean body mass, 1RM strength and osteocalcin, the only variables that remained in the final regression model predicting the changes in hip BMD, suggesting that exercise countered the unloading effect of weight loss on BMD.
“The ‘epidemic’ of obesity is paralleled by a ‘silent epidemic’ of reduced sleep duration with short sleep duration linked to increased risk of obesity both in adults and in children. These trends are detectable in adults as well as in children as young as 5 years.”
A prospective trial in four long-term care facilities examined the role of megestrol acetate and optimal feeding assistance.21 For 63 days, megestrol (400 mg/d) was given to 17 residents who were eating less than 75% of most meals. They received either usual care or optimal feeding assistance. Results suggest that megestrol in combination with optimal mealtime feeding assistance significantly increased oral intake in frail long-term care residents but was not effective under usual care conditions.
The opinions and assertions contained herein are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of the U.S. Air Force Medical Department or the U.S. Air Force at large.
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Nutritional supplements are predominantly available in liquid form, but also come in puddings, bars, and soups. Nutritional supplements should provide extra calories but not replace scheduled meals. Liquid oral supplements allow for rapid gastric emptying and can be given two hours before a meal.29 Flavor enhancers such as ham, natural bacon, and roast beef flavors sprinkled on cooked food or added during food preparation may improve food consumption and weight gain, but study results have been mixed.32–34
The rise in obesity among 40-to-64-year-olds accounts for much of the rise in both disability and physical-function limitations, according to Martin’s analysis. But while they were able to show a statistical link between the two trends, she explained that “not all obese people had limitations and not all people with limitations were obese.”
“It used to be thought that older patients don’t respond to treatment for obesity as well as younger patients,” Kahan says. “People assume that they couldn’t exercise as much or for whatever reason they couldn’t stick to diets as well. But we’ve disproven that.”
Certain medications may cause you to gain weight. These include some corticosteroids, antidepressants, and seizure medications. Medication can slow the rate at which your body burns calories, increase your appetite, or cause your body to hold extra water. All of these factors can lead to weight gain. If weight gain is a side effect of a medication you are taking, talk to your doctor about potentially switching to a different medication that isn’t associated with weight gain. 
Orlistat is recommended only for people 18 years of age and over in combination with a diet and exercise regimen. People who have difficulties with the absorption of food or who are not overweight should not take orlistat. Overweight is defined by the U.S. National Institutes of Health as having a body mass index (BMI) of 27 or greater.
The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program has been developed by Kate Lorig, a nurse, and her colleagues at Stanford University. While this program is not directed specifically at obese older adults, it has been used to help people with heart disease, arthritis, diabetes, and respiratory problems learn to self-manage their conditions through increasing their self-efficacy. It develops confidence in one’s ability to make the changes needed to lead a healthier life style through having participants make an action plan for each week. Each action plan addresses the questions of: what, how much, when, how often, and how confident older adults are that they can carry out the plan. Research has demonstrated that on a scale of one to ten (with ten being the most confident), people who rate themselves as at least a seven are more likely to be able to make the changes to become a more positive self-manager of their chronic condition than are those who score lower on the scale (Lorig et al, 2006). This program can be used as a prototype for nurses helping obese older adults to achieve success in losing weight.
10. Smith K, Greenwood C, Payette H, Alibhai S. An approach to the of unintentional weight loss in older adults, part one: prevalence rates and screening. Geriatrics & Aging. 2006;9(10):679-685.
28. Megestrol acetate: adverse effects. In: DrugPoints System. Micromedex Healthcare Series [Internet database]. Greenwood Village (CO): Thomson Reuters (Healthcare) Inc; Updated periodically. Available: www.thomsonhc.com/hcs/librarian (accessed 2011 Jan. 27).
Luckily, many weight-loss options are available, even for people who have tried earnestly but unsuccessfully to lose weight through diet, exercise, or prior weight-loss surgery. At the Houston UT MIST Center for Bariatric and Metabolic Surgery, our team of specialists can help you understand the causes and health risks of obesity, as well as the wide range of treatment options available to help you reach your target weight-loss goal and prevent obesity-related health risks.
Kelly KR, Haus JM, Solomon TPJ, Patrick-Melin AJ, Cook M, Rocco M, Barkoukis H, Kirwan JP. A low-glycemic index diet and exercise intervention reduces TNF(alpha) in isolated mononuclear cells of older, obese adults. J Nutr. 2011;141:1089–1094. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

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National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) (1998). Clinical Guidelines on the Identification, Evaluation, and Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults (PDF). International Medical Publishing, Inc. ISBN 1-58808-002-1.
Your caloric needs decrease as you age; therefore, for example, a woman over age 50 should cut back to between 1,600 and 2,000 calories a day, depending on her level of physical activity, according to the National Institute on Aging. If a lack of mobility is a hindrance to preparing healthy foods at home, don’t resort to calling for takeout. Instead, look into a grocery delivery service that allows you to place an order on the Internet and have it delivered to your doorstep. Eating enough food to keep up with the calories needed for movement is important, too — according to WebMD, seniors often grapple with preparing fresh, healthy foods at home due to difficulty chewing due to tooth pain or dentures, problems with indigestion and a declining sense of taste. Emotional problems such as depression or loneliness can play a role in both eating too little and eating too many of the wrong comfort foods. Visit a medical professional to determine a healthy diet for your physical and mental needs.
The short references to websites included in the table are not necessarily links: Copy and paste them into a browser for more information about these health risks of obesity from other sources. Also, these are just a few examples. Find more sources of information, studies, reports and papers by entering the name of the condition (e.g. diabetes) or body part (e.g. liver) into a search box or search engine together with the keyword “obesity”, e.g. [obesity liver].
That science is, in fact, fairly straightforward. Fat carries more than twice as many calories as carbohydrates and proteins do per gram, which means just a little fat can turn a serving of food into a calorie bomb. Sugar and other refined carbohydrates, like white flour and rice, high-starch foods, like corn and potatoes, aren’t as calorie-dense. But all of these “problem carbs” charge into the bloodstream as glucose in minutes, providing an energy rush, commonly followed by an energy crash that can lead to a surge in appetite.
Too much weight is especially hazardous for an aging body. Obesity exacerbates bone and muscle loss, increases inflammation and significantly raises the risk of diabetes, heart disease and stroke. Excess weight also increases the risk of developing chronic diseases, losing the ability to walk or dying earlier.
Unhealthy diet and eating habits. Weight gain is inevitable if you regularly eat more calories than you burn. And most Americans’ diets are too high in calories and are full of fast food and high-calorie beverages.
Obese children may experience immediate health consequences which can lead to weight-related health problems in adulthood. Obese children and teens have been found to have risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), including high cholesterol levels, high blood pressure, and abnormal glucose tolerance. In a sample of 5-to 17-year-olds, almost 60% of overweight children had at least one CVD risk factor and 25% of overweight children had two or more CVD risk factors. In addition, studies have shown that obese children and teens are more likely to become obese as adults.
“The food they’re cooking is making people sick,” Pollan has said of big food companies. “It is one of the reasons that we have the obesity and diabetes epidemics that we do … If you’re going to let industries decide how much salt, sugar and fat is in your food, they’re going to put [in] as much as they possibly can … They will push those buttons until we scream or die.” The solution, in his view, is to replace Big Food’s engineered, edible evil—through public education and regulation—with fresh, unprocessed, local, seasonal, real food.
Jump up ^ Bojanowska, Ewa; Ciosek, Joanna (15 February 2016). “Can We Selectively Reduce Appetite for Energy-Dense Foods? An Overview of Pharmacological Strategies for Modification of Food Preference Behavior”. Current Neuropharmacology. 14 (2): 118–42. doi:10.2174/1570159X14666151109103147. PMC 4825944 . PMID 26549651.
Jump up ^ Rosenheck R (November 2008). “Fast food consumption and increased caloric intake: a systematic review of a trajectory towards weight gain and obesity risk”. Obes Rev (Review). 9 (6): 535–47. doi:10.1111/j.1467-789X.2008.00477.x. PMID 18346099.
Measuring your waist circumference. Fat stored around your waist, sometimes called visceral fat or abdominal fat, may further increase your risk of diseases, such as diabetes and heart disease. Women with a waist measurement (circumference) of more than 35 inches (80 centimeters, or cm) and men with a waist measurement of more than 40 inches (102 cm) may have more health risks than do people with smaller waist measurements. Like the BMI measurement, your waist circumference should be checked at least once a year.
5. Graham M, Knight B. The many causes of involuntary weight loss: a 3-step approach to the diagnosis. www.hcplive.com/general/publications/Resident-and-Staff/2006/2006-11/2006-11_04. December 22, 2009.
Like many other medical conditions, obesity is the result of an interplay between genetic and environmental factors.[118] Polymorphisms in various genes controlling appetite and metabolism predispose to obesity when sufficient food energy is present. As of 2006, more than 41 of these sites on the human genome have been linked to the development of obesity when a favorable environment is present.[119] People with two copies of the FTO gene (fat mass and obesity associated gene) have been found on average to weigh 3–4 kg more and have a 1.67-fold greater risk of obesity compared with those without the risk allele.[120] The differences in BMI between people that are due to genetics varies depending on the population examined from 6% to 85%.[121]
Monsanto presents a series on what it means to be “Climate Smart” in the world of agriculture. The series will cover the role of climate change in impacting food security, agriculture, weather patterns and society at large.
Rising prevalence of obesity is a worldwide health concern because excess weight gain within populations forecasts an increased burden from several diseases, most notably cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and cancers. The trends project 65 million more obese adults in the USA by 2030, consequently accruing an additional 6-8.5 million cases of diabetes, 5.7-7.3 million cases of heart disease and stroke, and 492,000-669,000 additional cases of cancer. The combined medical costs associated with treatment of these preventable diseases are estimated to increase by $48-66 billion per year in the USA by 2030. Hence, effective policies to promote healthier weight also have economic benefits.
Saxenda was approved in late 2014 as a weight-loss drug in combination with physical activity and diet modifications. It is a once-a-day injection (not a pill) that mimics a hormone related to digestion and appetite control (GLP-1) that is used in the management of type 2 diabetes. It activates areas of the brain involved in appetite regulation.
Diabetes. Type 2 diabetes, the most common type of diabetes in older adults, results from interplay between genetic factors and environmental factors that contribute to obesity. Even a 15 pound weight gain can increase a person’s risk of diabetes by 50% (Daniels, 2006). There is an age-related increase in total body fat and visceral adiposity until age 65 that is often accompanied by diabetes or impaired glucose intolerance (Wilson & Kannel, 2007). In the Framingham Study 30-40% of people over 65 were found to have diabetes or glucose intolerance. Coronary disease is the most common and lethal sequel of type 2 diabetes. Lean-muscle mass begins to diminish after the age of 65. This decrease may be related to decreased physical activity, disability, anabolic hormone production, or increased cytokine activity. If calorie intake continues at the same rate while the muscle mass decreases, the older person will most likely experience fat weight gain (Tucker, 2006).
One study even found that adults between ages 60 and 74 were four times more likely to be depressed if they were obese [source: Pappas]. And obesity and aging joints is not a good mix, meaning that creaking knees will suffer more wear and tear when holding up someone who enjoys an extra trip back to the buffet table.
Frimel et al. (2008) reported on a cohort of 30 community-living frail older adults. The participants were sedentary (≤ 2 exercise sessions per week); had stable medications and stable weight (± 2 kg over the past year); and met two out of three criteria for mild–moderate physical frailty. The intervention used was similar to the previously included Villareal studies (Villareal 2006a; Villareal 2006b; Villareal 2008) with a slightly higher daily energy deficit (750 kcal per day versus 500–700 kcal/day). The goal was 10% loss of body weight over six months. Combined aerobic and resistance exercise sessions were 90 minutes three times per week and resistance exercises focused on upper extremity (UE) and lower extremity (LE) muscle groups. The loss of lean body mass was completely prevented in the UE, but not LE. Despite LE lean body mass loss, strength improved. It was proposed that muscle quality improved due to a decrease in muscle fat infiltration and inflammation due to weight loss, as previously reported (Goodpaster 2001; Nicklas 2004). It was also suggested that retention of lean body mass in the UE but not the LE was attributed to UE muscle being more responsive to high-intensity training because these muscle groups are not used regularly for daily activities such as walking and climbing stairs.
Any individual plan listed on our site carries the same costs and offers the exact same benefits regardless of whether you purchase it from our site, a government website, or your local insurance broker.
Take up a physical hobby like dancing, yoga, or water aerobics instead of — or in addition to — something sedentary like bingo or bridge. Keeping up the physical activity will help you keep the mobility you have and may even increase flexibility and range of movement. And you may even make some new friends.
Trim, affluent Americans of course have a right to view dietary questions from their own perspective—that is, in terms of what they need to eat in order to add perhaps a few months onto the already healthy courses of their lives. The pernicious sleight of hand is in willfully confusing what might benefit them—small, elite minority that they are—with what would help most of society. The conversations they have among themselves in The Times, in best-selling books, and at Real Food Daily may not register with the working-class obese. But these conversations unquestionably distort the views of those who are in a position to influence what society does about the obesity problem.
Because they are energy-intense foods, fat and sugar and other problem carbs trip the pleasure and reward meters placed in our brains by evolution over the millions of years during which starvation was an ever-present threat. We’re born enjoying the stimulating sensations these ingredients provide, and exposure strengthens the associations, ensuring that we come to crave them and, all too often, eat more of them than we should. Processed food is not an essential part of this story: recent examinations of ancient human remains in Egypt, Peru, and elsewhere have repeatedly revealed hardened arteries, suggesting that pre-industrial diets, at least of the affluent, may not have been the epitome of healthy eating that the Pollanites make them out to be. People who want to lose weight and keep it off are almost always advised by those who run successful long-term weight-loss programs to transition to a diet high in lean protein, complex carbs such as whole grains and legumes, and the sort of fiber vegetables are loaded with. Because these ingredients provide us with the calories we need without the big, fast bursts of energy, they can be satiating without pushing the primitive reward buttons that nudge us to eat too much.
The points in this article clearly show that in the elderly population, weight classification may not always be accurate, which is one of the difficulties encountered in older adults. This is the first hurdle encountered when trying to evaluate and treat this disease in the elderly.
Alcohol is full of empty calories that cause weight gain. This doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy an occasional drink or a small glass of wine with dinner, it just means that keeping alcohol intake low will help avoid going overboard on empty calories.
The rise in obesity among 40-to-64-year-olds accounts for much of the rise in both disability and physical-function limitations, according to Martin’s analysis. But while they were able to show a statistical link between the two trends, she explained that “not all obese people had limitations and not all people with limitations were obese.”
Yet experts agree it’s important to focus on achieving your healthy weight no matter the number of candles on your birthday cake this year. “Excess fat is something we shouldn’t ignore no matter how old we are,” says Robert Huizenga, MD, the physician featured on The Biggest Loser. And while it can be tempting to throw in the towel, thinking you’re fighting an uphill battle at 60-something, compared with your 20- and 30-something counterparts, he has some interesting news: “There has actually been no difference in the amount or rate of weight loss in individuals of either sex who are over 60 years old versus those who are younger on the 17 seasons of the Biggest Loser show,” says Huizenga. So, while it might feel a little tougher (damn you, sore back), it is possible.
Esophageal adenocarcinoma: People who are overweight or obese are about twice as likely as normal-weight people to develop a type of esophageal cancer called esophageal adenocarcinoma, and people who are extremely obese are more than four times as likely (9).
She was quick to point out that the disability rate of the preretirement age group is “still quite low compared to older Americans,” although it was a full percentage point higher—5 percent instead of 4 percent—compared to people of that same age 10 years earlier.
Such steps are enormously promising, says Jamy Ard, an epidemiology and preventive-medicine researcher at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and a co-director of the Weight Management Center there. “Processed food is a key part of our environment, and it needs to be part of the equation,” he explains. “If you can reduce fat and calories by only a small amount in a Big Mac, it still won’t be a health food, but it wouldn’t be as bad, and that could have a huge impact on us.” Ard, who has been working for more than a decade with the obese poor, has little patience with the wholesome-food movement’s call to eliminate fast food in favor of farm-fresh goods. “It’s really naive,” he says. “Fast food became popular because it’s tasty and convenient and cheap. It makes a lot more sense to look for small, beneficial changes in that food than it does to hold out for big changes in what people eat that have no realistic chance of happening.”
Lee JS, Visser M, Tylavsky FA, Kritchevshy SB, Schwartz AV, Sahyoun N, Harris TB, Newman AB. Weight loss and regain and effects on body composition: the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2010;65:78–83. [PMC free article] [PubMed]
Credentials: Diets which are created or endorsed by medical professionals are more likely to provide good advice. This does not mean any diet endorsed by a professional is good but it does have a better chance of being healthy.
Researchers say current life expectancy predictions were based on obesity rates in 1988-1994, which was the midpoint of the obesity epidemic and included many older adults born in 1885-1976 who had much lower obesity rates over their lifetimes.

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Exercise is important no matter the dog’s age. It might be difficult for your dog to get up and go for a walk if is overweight and suffering from joint pains due to extra weight but every little counts. Even if you just play fetch for a few minutes, it will have a positive effect on your dog’s journey to weight-loss.
Appetite-suppressant drugs are sometimes prescribed to aid in weight loss. These drugs work by increasing levels of serotonin or catecholamine, which are brain chemicals that control feelings of fullness. Appetite suppressants, though, are not considered truly effective, since most of the weight lost while taking them is usually regained after stopping them. Also, suppressants containing amphetamines can be
For children and adolescents (younger than 20 years of age), overweight and obesity are based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) BMI-for-age growth charts, which are available at http://www.cdc.gov/growthcharts/clinical_charts.htm:
The foods we eat every day contribute to our well-being. Foods provide us with the nutrients we need for healthy bodies and the calories we need for energy. If we take in more calories than we burn, the extra food turns to fat and is stored in our bodies. If we overeat regularly, we gain weight, and if we continue to gain weight, we may become obese.
In a June 5 speech to the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Julie Gerberding reported that, in terms of controllable health factors, obesity is closing in on tobacco use as the leading cause of death in the United States, and needs to become a major priority for the U.S. healthcare system. Aggregated results from Gallup’s annual Health and Healthcare polls from 2000 to 2002*, reveal that obesity is a particularly serious problem among the “baby boomer” generation and those slightly older.
Every adult should have his or her BMI calculated at least once a year. The American Heart Association offers an online BMI calculator for adults. Patients with a BMI of 30 or higher are considered obese and need treatment.
Some wholesome foodies openly celebrate fat and problem carbs, insisting that the lack of processing magically renders them healthy. In singing the praises of clotted cream and lard-loaded cookies, for instance, a recent Wall Street Journal article by Ron Rosenbaum explained that “eating basic, earthy, fatty foods isn’t just a supreme experience of the senses—it can actually be good for you,” and that it’s “too easy to conflate eating fatty food with eating industrial, oil-fried junk food.” That’s right, we wouldn’t want to make the same mistake that all the cells in our bodies make. Pollan himself makes it clear in his writing that he has little problem with fat—as long as it’s not in food “your great-grandmother wouldn’t recognize.”
The branch of medicine that deals with the study and treatment of obesity is known as bariatrics. As obesity has become a major health problem in the United States, bariatrics has become a separate medical and surgical specialty.
Public healthcare professionals will need to brace themselves for this increase in seniors. Healthcare costs for treating related ailments such as type-2 diabetes, hypertension, heart disease and mobility constraints will likely increase in seniors who face a higher-than-average obesity rate.
• Psychiatric. Weight loss is depression’s key symptom and may be present with bipolar, personality, dysmorphic, and anxiety disorders, as well as substance abuse and alcoholism, and nicotine addiction. 5
Asthma is a condition in which hyperreactive airways constrict and result in symptoms like wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath. Causes of asthma include genetics, environmental factors, personal history of allergies, and other factors. Asthma is diagnosed by a physician based on a patient’s family history and results from lung function tests and other exams. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and long-acting bronchodilators (LABAs) are used in the treatment of asthma. Generally, the prognosis for a patient with asthma is good. Exposure to allergens found on farms may protect against asthma symptoms.
Jump up ^ Global Burden of Metabolic Risk Factors for Chronic Diseases Collaboration (BMI Mediated, Effects); Lu, Y; Hajifathalian, K; Ezzati, M; Woodward, M; Rimm, EB; Danaei, G (15 March 2014). “Metabolic mediators of the effects of body-mass index, overweight, and obesity on coronary heart disease and stroke: a pooled analysis of 97 prospective cohorts with 1·8 million participants”. Lancet. 383 (9921): 970–83. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(13)61836-X. PMC 3959199 . PMID 24269108.
Diagnosis of obesity is made by observation and by comparing the patient’s weight to ideal weight charts. Many doctors and obesity researchers refer to the body mass index (BMI), which uses a height-weight relationship to calculate an individual’s ideal weight and personal risk of developing obesity-related health problems. Physicians may also obtain direct measurements of an individual’s body fat content by using calipers to measure skin-fold thickness at the back of the upper arm and other sites. The most accurate means of measuring body fat content involves immersing a person in water and measuring relative displacement; however, this method is very impractical and is usually only used in scientific studies requiring very specific assessments. Women whose body fat exceeds 30% and men whose body fat exceeds 25% are generally considered obese.
Luckily, many weight-loss options are available, even for people who have tried earnestly but unsuccessfully to lose weight through diet, exercise, or prior weight-loss surgery. At the Houston UT MIST Center for Bariatric and Metabolic Surgery, our team of specialists can help you understand the causes and health risks of obesity, as well as the wide range of treatment options available to help you reach your target weight-loss goal and prevent obesity-related health risks.
Eating too much or eating too little during your pregnancy can change your baby’s DNA and can affect how your child stores and uses fat later in life. Also, studies have shown that obese fathers have DNA changes in their sperm that can be passed on to their children.
Adopted by the World Health Assembly in 2004, the “WHO Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health” describes the actions needed to support healthy diets and regular physical activity. The Strategy calls upon all stakeholders to take action at global, regional and local levels to improve diets and physical activity patterns at the population level.
The rapid rise in the incidence of obesity in the United States since 1990 has prompted researchers to look for new treatments. One approach involves the application of antidiabetes drugs to the treatment of obesity. Metformin (Glucophage), a drug that was approved by the Food and Dug Administration (FDA) in 1994 for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, shows promise in treating obesity associated with insulin resistance.
Hoyo C, Cook MB, Kamangar F, et al. Body mass index in relation to oesophageal and oesophagogastric junction adenocarcinomas: a pooled analysis from the International BEACON Consortium. International Journal of Epidemiology 2012; 41(6):1706-1718.
Gordon’s team then repeated the experiment with one small twist: after giving the baby mice microbes from their respective twins, they moved the animals into a shared cage. This time both groups remained lean. Studies showed that the mice carrying microbes from the obese human had picked up some of their lean roommates’ gut bacteria—especially varieties of Bacteroidetes—probably by consuming their feces, a typical, if unappealing, mouse behavior. To further prove the point, the researchers transferred 54 varieties of bacteria from some lean mice to those with the obese-type community of germs and found that the animals that had been destined to become obese developed a healthy weight instead. Transferring just 39 strains did not do the trick. “Taken together, these experiments provide pretty compelling proof that there is a cause-and-effect relationship and that it was possible to prevent the development of obesity,” Gordon says.
In many cases of elderly weight loss, a combination of factors is to blame. Many of these factors can be considered secondary to existing medical conditions. For example, some seniors who suffer from mental illnesses such as psychotic disorders or Alzheimer’s disease experience paranoia and suspicion which prevent them from eating the food they are served. This is actually quite common in long term and psychiatric care facilities. Elderly people with these disorders also expend extra energy pacing and performing other habitual movements.
Breast cancer: Many studies have shown that, in postmenopausal women, a higher BMI is associated with a modest increase in risk of breast cancer. For example, a 5-unit increase in BMI is associated with a 12% increase in risk (21). Among postmenopausal women, those who are obese have a 20% to 40% increase in risk of developing breast cancer compared with normal-weight women (22). The higher risks are seen mainly in women who have never used menopausal hormone therapy and for tumors that express hormone receptors. Obesity is also a risk factor for breast cancer in men (23).
“In older, obese people, it may be more important to improve physical function and quality of life, rather than to reverse or treat risk factors for cardiovascular disease,” says Villareal, now chief of geriatrics at the New Mexico Veterans Affairs Health Care System and professor of medicine at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine, both in Albuquerque. “Combining exercise and weight loss isn’t designed so much to extend their life expectancy as it is to improve their quality of life during their remaining years and to help seniors avoid being admitted to a nursing home.”
Jump up ^ Poirier P, Giles TD, Bray GA, Hong Y, Stern JS, Pi-Sunyer FX, Eckel RH (May 2006). “Obesity and cardiovascular disease: pathophysiology, evaluation, and effect of weight loss”. Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol. (Review). 26 (5): 968–76. doi:10.1161/01.ATV.0000216787.85457.f3. PMID 16627822.
Diet is an important factor in shaping the gut ecosystem. A diet of highly processed foods, for example, has been linked to a less diverse gut community in people. Gordon’s team demonstrated the complex interaction among food, microbes and body weight by feeding their humanized mice a specially prepared unhealthy chow that was high in fat and low in fruits, vegetables and fiber (as opposed to the usual high-fiber, low-fat mouse kibble). Given this “Western diet,” the mice with obese-type microbes proceeded to grow fat even when housed with lean cagemates. The unhealthy diet somehow prevented the virtuous bacteria from moving in and flourishing.
One problem with using weight-for-height tables is that doctors disagree over which is the best table to use. Several versions are available. Many have different weight ranges, and some tables account for a person’s frame size, age and sex, while other tables do not.

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According to the CDC, an estimated 112,000 excess deaths per year are associated with obesity. Obesity puts individuals at risk for more than 30 chronic health conditions. They include: type 2 diabetes, high cholesterol, hypertension, gallstones, heart disease, fatty liver disease, sleep apnea, GERD, stress incontinence, heart failure, degenerative joint disease, birth defects, miscarriages, asthma and other respiratory conditions, and numerous cancers.
With her wedding just days away, Wilhelm tried to get to the bottom of her father’s alarming transformation. Because he was diabetic, his primary care physician assumed the weight loss was diabetes-related and treated the problem as such. Wilhelm, worried that the condition might be more serious, tried insisting that her father go to the hospital, but he wouldn’t hear of it.
Being overweight or obese can cause plaque to accumulate in your arteries. If that plaque breaks free from an artery, it can create a blood clot, and if that clot is close to your brain, it can prevent blood and oxygen from reaching your brain, causing a stroke. The risk of having a stroke corresponds to BMI: high BMI = high risk, and low BMI = low risk. That’s one more good reason for losing excess weight.
 Fat cells produce adipokines, hormones that may stimulate or inhibit cell growth. For example, the level of an adipokine called leptin, which seems to promote cell proliferation, in the blood increases with increasing body fat. And another adipokine, adiponectin—which is less abundant in obese people than in those of normal weight—may have antiproliferative effects.
Adopted by the World Health Assembly in 2004, the “WHO Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health” describes the actions needed to support healthy diets and regular physical activity. The Strategy calls upon all stakeholders to take action at global, regional and local levels to improve diets and physical activity patterns at the population level.
High blood pressure – Additional fat tissue in the body needs oxygen and nutrients in order to live, which requires the blood vessels to circulate more blood to the fat tissue. This increases the workload of the heart because it must pump more blood through additional blood vessels. More circulating blood also means more pressure on the artery walls. Higher pressure on the artery walls increases the blood pressure. In addition, extra weight can raise the heart rate and reduce the body’s ability to transport blood through the vessels.
Age. Obesity can occur at any age, even in young children. But as you age, hormonal changes and a less active lifestyle increase your risk of obesity. In addition, the amount of muscle in your body tends to decrease with age. This lower muscle mass leads to a decrease in metabolism. These changes also reduce calorie needs, and can make it harder to keep off excess weight. If you don’t consciously control what you eat and become more physically active as you age, you’ll likely gain weight.
As with obesity in adults, many factors contribute to the rising rates of childhood obesity. Changing diet and decreasing physical activity are believed to be the two most important causes for the recent increase in the incidence of child obesity.[228] Because childhood obesity often persists into adulthood and is associated with numerous chronic illnesses, children who are obese are often tested for hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and fatty liver.[81] Treatments used in children are primarily lifestyle interventions and behavioral techniques, although efforts to increase activity in children have had little success.[229] In the United States, medications are not FDA approved for use in this age group.[227] Multi-component behaviour change interventions that include changes to dietary and physical activity may reduce BMI in the short term in children aged 6 to 11 years, although the benefits are small and quality of evidence is low.[230]
For example, your BMI doesn’t show whether your weight is fat or muscle. If you’re a super-fit athlete, your muscle might put you in the “overweight” or “obese” range. Or, if you’re elderly and have lost muscle mass over the years, your BMI could be normal, but you’re not in as good shape as you think.
Federal dietary guidelines and the MyPlate website recommend many tips for healthy eating that may also help you control your weight (see the Additional Links section for hyperlinks). Here are a few examples:
Before your doctor will prescribe medicines or surgery, he or she will probably want you to work on healthier eating and activity for at least 6 months. Even if your doctor gives you medicines or recommends surgery, you will need to keep your new healthy habits for the rest of your life.
Counseling. Therapy or interventions with trained mental health or other professionals can help you address emotional and behavioral issues related to eating. Therapy can help you understand why you overeat and learn healthy ways to cope with anxiety. You can also learn how to monitor your diet and activity, understand eating triggers, and cope with food cravings. Therapy can take place on both an individual and group basis. More-intensive programs — those that include 12 to 26 sessions a year — may be more helpful in achieving your weight-loss goals.
Under-nutrition and obesity often exist side-by-side within the same country, the same community and even within the same household and this double burden is caused by inadequate pre-natal, infant and young child nutrition followed by exposure to high-fat, energy-dense, micronutrient-poor foods and lack of physical activity.
Dom Naish is a Phoenix-based writer, vegan, cupcake addict and dog lover. Years in the animal rescue trenches have taught him every aspect of dog ownership from behavioral problems, personality and breed specific trait differences of all dogs.
Dougan MM, Hankinson SE, Vivo ID, et al. Prospective study of body size throughout the life-course and the incidence of endometrial cancer among premenopausal and postmenopausal women. International Journal of Cancer 2015; 137(3):625-37.
Researchers know that our brains can become patterned so that we feel pleasure or reward from eating. This can make us unconsciously crave food so our bodies feel that sense of pleasure. It can also make it hard to change our eating patterns, lose weight, or maintain a healthy weight. Researchers are studying whether cognitive behavioral therapies can be an effective treatment for overweight and obesity by retraining the brain to not associate pleasure with food and the act of eating.
Energy imbalances can cause overweight and obesity. An energy imbalance means that your energy IN does not equal your energy OUT. This energy is measured in calories. Energy IN is the amount of calories you get from food and drinks. Energy OUT is the amount of calories that your body uses for things such as breathing, digesting, being physically active, and regulating body temperature.
Gastric bypass surgery—helps you lose weight by changing how your stomach and small intestine handle the food you eat. After the surgery, you will be able to eat as much as before, and your body will not absorb all the calories and other nutrients from the food you eat.
A great first step is to partner with your doctor. If he doesn’t bring up the topic, make the first move and let him know that you want to work toward a healthier weight. Ask for advice, or for a referral to another doctor with more experience in this area. You might also want a referral to a nutritionist and a certified fitness trainer.
Quitting smoking. Quitting smoking is often associated with weight gain. And for some, it can lead to enough weight gain that the person becomes obese. In the long run, however, quitting smoking is still a greater benefit to your health than continuing to smoke.
For older adults who are struggling with obesity, a weight loss program that minimizes muscle and bone loss and also takes into account functional impairments or metabolic complications is often the most beneficial way to get weight issues under control. These programs usually include nutritional counseling from a registered dietician or nutritionist, and can help ensure that older adults meet daily nutritional requirements while also moderately decreasing daily calorie intake for weight loss. Additionally, through the implementation of regular physical exercise older adults can improve physical functioning and better preserve muscle and bone mass. The best types of exercises recommend for the older adults include stretching, aerobics, and strengthen exercises as they help improve flexibility, endurance, and strength and reduce the risk of musculoskeletal injuries.
Measuring overweight and obesity in children aged 5 to 14 years is challenging – the WHO Child Growth Standards includes BMI charts for infants and young children up to age 5 – childhood obesity is associated with a higher chance of premature death and disability in adulthood.
Millennials, you have tried taking them to Chipotle. You have tried lecturing them about not drinking Diet Coke. Keep trying, but consider giving them a book written for them by one of them. It will open their eyes, and hopefully their hearts, before it is too late for them and for you.
A 2006 review identified ten other possible contributors to the recent increase of obesity: (1) insufficient sleep, (2) endocrine disruptors (environmental pollutants that interfere with lipid metabolism), (3) decreased variability in ambient temperature, (4) decreased rates of smoking, because smoking suppresses appetite, (5) increased use of medications that can cause weight gain (e.g., atypical antipsychotics), (6) proportional increases in ethnic and age groups that tend to be heavier, (7) pregnancy at a later age (which may cause susceptibility to obesity in children), (8) epigenetic risk factors passed on generationally, (9) natural selection for higher BMI, and (10) assortative mating leading to increased concentration of obesity risk factors (this would increase the number of obese people by increasing population variance in weight).[85] While there is evidence supporting the influence of these mechanisms on the increased prevalence of obesity, the evidence is still inconclusive, and the authors state that these are probably less influential than the ones discussed in the previous paragraph.
Certain medications. Some medications can lead to weight gain if you don’t compensate through diet or activity. These medications include some antidepressants, anti-seizure medications, diabetes medications, antipsychotic medications, steroids and beta blockers.
Diet and exercise, as always, remain the best ways to treat obesity. Diets should be loaded with fresh vegetables and fruits to help stop weight gain. Remember, as we age we tend towards less physical activity, which decreases our calorie needs. Seniors should eat portions based on their personal caloric needs, but ensure they maintain appropriate nutritional levels -regardless of portion size. One of the best ways to reduce calories is to eliminate fatty, sugary snacks and replace them with healthy nuts and fruits.Getting regular exercise – even light activities like walking – is important to maintaining a healthy weight and lifestyle.
One of the best sources for information about nutrition for seniors is from the USDA’s Food and Nutrition Center, where senior adults can find a wealth of health information about healthy aging, how to obtain home-delivered meals for seniors on a fixed income, a graphic guide to eating called Myplate for Older Adults, food labels, food safety, meal planning, food shopping, and ways to increase enjoyment with eating.
“For the baby boomers, nothing will magically happen to change that,” Hamburg said. “Societal change will take time. It’s a matter of education and realizing the danger of going into retirement age with a less healthy life and more chronic disease. For the time being, the boomers are aging into obesity-related illnesses, which will translate into a cost crisis for health care and Medicare.”
I’m not picking out rare, less healthy examples from these establishments. Check out their menus online: fat, sugar, and other refined carbs abound. (Café Gratitude says it uses only “healthy” fats and natural sweeteners; Akasha says its focus is not on “health food” but on “farm to fork” fare.) In fact, because the products and dishes offered by these types of establishments tend to emphasize the healthy-sounding foods they contain, I find it much harder to navigate through them to foods that go easy on the oil, butter, refined grains, rice, potatoes, and sugar than I do at far less wholesome restaurants. (These dishes also tend to contain plenty of sea salt, which Pollanites hold up as the wholesome alternative to the addictive salt engineered by the food industry, though your body can’t tell the difference.)
You will need close medical monitoring while taking a prescription weight-loss medication. Also, keep in mind that a weight-loss medication may not work for everyone, and the effects may wane over time. When you stop taking a weight-loss medication, you may regain much or all of the weight you lost.
The BMI does not tke count for mass of muscle versus mass of fat. A BMI both below and above the so-called normal values can be healthy if there is little fat, but well developed muscle mass. And a person with a BMI less that 18.5 can be too fat if the muscle mass is very scant, but much fat.
Remember to ask about travel history; feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) testing, exposure, and vaccination history; environmental exposures (e.g. second-hand smoke, herbicides); prior anesthesia; and any medications being given. Many medications can cause gastrointestinal (GI) distress. Common examples are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, glucocorticoids, chemotherapeutics, fluoroquinolones, amoxicillin, ACE inhibitors (e.g. benazepril, enalapril), and digoxin. Medications (notably doxycycline), improper medication administration, and reflux into the esophagus during anesthesia may cause esophageal stricture.

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Kidney disease means that the kidneys are damaged and can’t filter blood like they should. This damage can cause wastes to build up in the body. It can also cause other problems that can harm your health.

Dr. Ann Mabe Newman received a Diploma in Nursing from The University of Virginia, a BSN from The University of North Carolina at Charlotte, a MSN from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a DSN from The University of Alabama-Birmingham. She received CNE certification in 2007. Currently she is an Associate Professor at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte where she has served as President of the Faculty Senate and received the prestigious Bank of America and Governor’s Award for teaching excellence. Dr. Newman has also served on the State Board of Nursing for North Carolina and most recently on the American Nurses Association Congress on Nursing Practice and Economics. For the past 20 years she has maintained a research program on self-management in chronic illness, and she has published extensively on this topic. Dr. Newman’s work has focused on using the concept of self-efficacy to encourage clients, students, and community groups to accomplish things they thought were not possible. Ann notes that as a healthy, older person, her respect and admiration for older adults who persevere in spite of their chronic illnesses continues to grow.

Weight-loss trials with adults 65 years and older that include mechanisms are few. These studies demonstrate that volume of exercise (particularly resistance training) appears critical in attenuating the loss of bone and muscle, along with calcium and Vitamin D supplementation. Inflammatory molecules and pathways, bone active hormones, exercise, mechanical unloading, sclerostin, and diet composition (glycemic index) all appear to be mediators in the response to weight loss.

“In older, obese people, it may be more important to improve physical function and quality of life, rather than to reverse or treat risk factors for cardiovascular disease,” says Villareal, now chief of geriatrics at the New Mexico Veterans Affairs Health Care System and professor of medicine at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine, both in Albuquerque. “Combining exercise and weight loss isn’t designed so much to extend their life expectancy as it is to improve their quality of life during their remaining years and to help seniors avoid being admitted to a nursing home.”

Another job vacancy associated with obesity might be one normally filled by a stomach bacterium called Helicobacter pylori. Research by Martin Blaser of New York University suggests that it helps to regulate appetite by modulating levels of ghrelin—a hunger-stimulating hormone. H. pylori was once abundant in the American digestive tract but is now rare, thanks to more hygienic living conditions and the use of antibiotics, says Blaser, author of a new book entitled Missing Microbes.

Jump up ^ Thangaratinam S, Rogozinska E, Jolly K, Glinkowski S, Roseboom T, Tomlinson JW, Kunz R, Mol BW, Coomarasamy A, Khan KS (16 May 2012). “Effects of interventions in pregnancy on maternal weight and obstetric outcomes: meta-analysis of randomised evidence”. BMJ (Clinical research ed.) (Meta-analysis). 344: e2088. doi:10.1136/bmj.e2088. PMC 3355191 . PMID 22596383.

Nov. 23, 2016 — Older baby boomers—those born between 1945 and 1954—are the “stroke-healthiest generation,” according to a new study that found the lowest incidence of ischemic stroke in this age group … read more

Also, our busy lives make it harder to plan and cook healthy meals. For many of us, it’s easier to reach for prepared foods, go out to eat, or go to the drive-through. But these foods are often high in saturated fat and calories. Portions are often too large. Work schedules, long commutes, and other commitments also cut into the time we have for physical activity.

For most individuals who are mildly obese, these behavior modifications entail life-style changes they can make independently while being supervised by a family physician. Other mildly obese persons may seek the help of a commercial weight-loss program (e.g., Weight Watchers). The effectiveness of these programs is difficult to assess, since programs vary widely, drop-out rates are high, and few employ members of the medical community. However, programs that emphasize realistic goals, gradual progress, sensible eating, and exercise can be very helpful and are recommended by many doctors. Programs that promise instant weight loss or feature severely restricted diets are not effective and, in some cases, can be dangerous.

That means more Americans are getting heavier earlier in their lives and carrying the extra pounds for longer periods of time, which suggests that the impact for chronic disease and life expectancy may be worse than previously thought.

WEDNESDAY, May 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Older, obese adults need to shed weight, but dieting can worsen their frailty. A new study addresses this conundrum, suggesting seniors take up both aerobic and resistance exercise while slimming down.

There were other factors that made the legislation possible, including a legislature determined to address the rising economic costs of obesity and support from Ms. Bachelet, a socialist who also happens to be trained as a pediatrician.

Armamento-Villareal R, Sadler C, Napoli N, Shah K, Chode S, Sinacore DR, Qualls C, Villareal DT. Weight loss in obese older adults increases serum sclerostin and impairs hip geometry but both are prevented by exercise training. J Bone Miner Res. 2012;27:1215–1221. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

I’m running in the NYC Marathon in November to celebrate my 55th birthday and raise money for the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, in memory of a friend who succumbed to the disease last year. Here’s an update on my training schedule for this week:

Obesity in older adults is ubiquitous in many developed countries and is related to various negative health outcomes, making it an important public health target for intervention. However, treatment approaches for obesity in older adults remain controversial due to concerns surrounding the difficulty of behavior change with advancing age, exacerbating the age-related loss of skeletal muscle and bone, and the feasibility of long-term weight maintenance and related health consequences. This review serves to systematically examine the evidence regarding weight loss interventions with a focus on obese (body mass index 30 kg/m2 and above) older adults (aged 65 years and older) and some proposed mechanisms associated with exercise and caloric restriction (lifestyle intervention). Our findings indicate that healthy weight loss in this age group can be achieved through lifestyle interventions of up to a one-year period. Most interventions reviewed reported a loss of lean body mass and bone mineral density with weight loss. Paradoxically muscle quality and physical function improved. Inflammatory molecules and metabolic markers also improved, although the independent and additive effects of exercise and weight loss on these pathways are poorly understood. Using our review inclusion criteria, only one small pilot study investigating long-term weight maintenance and associated health implications was found in the literature. Future research on lifestyle interventions for obese older adults should address the loss of bone and lean body mass, inflammatory mechanisms, and include sufficient follow up to assess long-term weight maintenance and health outcomes.

Several randomized clinical trials in breast cancer survivors have reported weight loss interventions that resulted in both weight loss and beneficial changes in biomarkers that have been linked to the association between obesity and prognosis (43, 44). there is little evidence about whether weight loss improves cancer recurrence or prognosis (45). The NCI-sponsored Breast Cancer WEight Loss (BWEL) Study, a randomized phase III trial that is currently recruiting participants, will compare recurrence rate in overweight and obese women who take part in a weight loss program after breast cancer diagnosis with that in women who do not take part in the weight loss program.

If current trends continue, Australia’s Generation X will overtake Baby Boomers for poor health, including rates of obesity and diabetes, which could have huge implications for healthcare and the workforce. Researchers compared the health status of Baby Boomers (born from 1946-1965) and Generation X (1966-1980) at the same age range of 25-44 years and found that Generation X had significantly poorer levels of self-rated health, and higher levels of obesity and diabetes compared with Boomers, with no real difference in physical activity between the two groups.

43. Saiqal CS, Wessells H, Pace J, Schonlau M, Wilt TJ: Urologic diseases in America Project: predictors and prevalence of erectile dysfunction in a racially diverse population. Arch Intern Med 2006; 166: 207– 212 [PubMed]

For the past year, President Trump has worked with the Republican Congress to dismantle crucial parts of Obama’s legacy, including affordable health care, progressive taxation, climate-change regulation, oversight of the financial system, and immigration reform. Discussions of Medicare and Medicaid cuts surfacing in recent weeks suggest that an effort to roll back Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society might be next.