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In 2004, the United Kingdom Royal College of Physicians, the Faculty of Public Health and the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health released the report “Storing up Problems”, which the growing problem of obesity in the UK.[159] The same year, the House of Commons Health Select Committee published its “most comprehensive inquiry […] ever undertaken” into the impact of obesity on health and society in the UK and possible approaches to the problem.[160] In 2006, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) issued a guideline on the diagnosis and management of obesity, as well as policy implications for non-healthcare organizations such as local councils.[161] A 2007 report produced by Derek Wanless for the King’s Fund warned that unless further action was taken, obesity had the capacity to cripple the National Health Service financially.[162]
In the second paper, all CVD risk factors significantly improved in the diet and exercise group (Villareal 2006b). Specific mechanisms were not proposed, but the discussion focused on medical care costs related to metabolic coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors that were ameliorated by the intervention (Table 1). In the third paper (Villareal 2008), bone turnover was measured by type 1 collagen C-terminal telopeptide (CTX), osteocalcin, and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase. There was a marked increase in serum CTX (~100-fold) and osteocalcin (~60-fold) concentrations in response to weight loss indicating that bone resorption and formation, respectively, were stimulated. Moreover, the increases in both CTX and osteocalcin concentrations correlated with decreases in hip bone mineral density (BMD), suggesting that weight-loss induced bone loss was due to increased bone turnover, with greater stimulation of bone resorption than bone formation. However, the clinical significance of the decrease in BMD was not clear as all participants had high baseline BMD Z-scores, and none had evidence of osteoporosis following weight loss. The investigators argued that BMD was not lost in the spine, which implies that the exercises were more effective in preserving BMD at this site. Exact mechanisms for loss of BMD with weight loss are not currently elucidated, but it was suggested that weight loss decreases the mechanical stress on the hip, without negatively impacting the spine or wrist. Weight loss was also associated with a 25% reduction in serum leptin that was highly correlated with decreased hip BMD. No such relationship was found between decreasing estradiol and changes in BMD. Leptin was discussed in the context of its inhibiting action on the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) ligand levels (Burguera 2001) and osteoblast differentiation (Cornish 2002). Levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), cortisol, and parathyroid hormone (PTH) did not change in response to weight loss, which suggests that these bone-active hormones were not involved with the loss of BMD in the hip. Vitamin D supplementation during the trial did not reach optimal serum concentrations and whether higher dose Vitamin D supplementation could have slowed bone loss, was raised by the investigators. It was also noted that bone quality was not measured and could have been positively impacted by the exercise training intervention.
The medication is approved for patients who are obese (BMI >30) or overweight (BMQ >27) with one weight-related health issue. The predominant side effects were headache and dizziness, as well as fatigue. In patients with diabetes, low blood sugar was also a concern when taking Belviq.
New interventions for childhood overweight and obesity. NHLBI is supporting new projects to prevent and treat childhood obesity. The NHLBI-Sponsored the COPTR program and the Healthy Communities Study to see how well programs were working to prevent childhood obesity in different populations.
“Transport options and workplaces encourage sedentary behavior, and food high in fat and sugar is often more readily available than a healthier alternative. This may account for why the younger generation is developing unhealthy weight levels at an earlier age,” she says.
Meyerhardt JA, Tepper JE, Niedzwiecki D, et al. Impact of body mass index on outcomes and treatment-related toxicity in patients with stage II and III rectal cancer: findings from Intergroup Trial 0114. Journal of Clinical Oncology 2004; 22(4):648-657.
The answers to these questions may reveal important clues about the cat’s weight loss. For example, in some households, pets compete for food, and underfeeding results. Clients may feed a weight-loss diet and continue it even after an optimal weight has been achieved. An arthritic or visually impaired cat may not be able to make it to food bowls that are difficult to access, such as on a countertop or in a dark basement. And an inability to smell food, the administration of certain medications, or a systemic illness can result in a decreased appetite, even in cats being fed a high-quality, palatable food.
Getting the correct ratios of protein, carbohydrates, and good-quality fats can help in weight loss via enhancement of the metabolism. Support groups that are informed about healthy, nutritious, and balanced diets can offer an individual the support he or she needs to maintain this type of eating regimen.
Gaining too much weight during pregnancy can have long-term effects for both mother and child. These effects include that the mother will have overweight or obesity after the child is born. Another risk is that the baby may gain too much weight later as a child or as an adult.
 The key to successful long-term weight loss is to focus less on “dieting,” which tends to be a short-term fix, and more on lifestyle changes, primarily healthy eating, and regular exercise. Your goal should be to make health, not appearance, your priority, meaning your weight loss lifestyle changes must include both diet and exercise.
One of the most common New Year’s resolutions sure to top lists in 2017? Losing weight. And while shedding unwanted pounds is hard at any age, it can be especially challenging for seniors. Still, losing weight and keeping it off is a worthwhile endeavor as doing so can improve both your health and quality of life. Here’s a closer look at the issue of weight loss for older adults, along with several tips aimed at helping seniors reach their weight loss goals.
Other measurements that reflect the distribution of body fat—that is, whether more fat is carried around the hips or the abdomen—are increasingly being used along with BMI as indicators of obesity and disease risks. These measurements include waist circumference and the waist-to-hip ratio (the waist circumference divided by the hip circumference).
Lars Sjöström, M.D., Ph.D., Anna-Karin Lindroos, Ph.D., Markku Peltonen, Ph.D., Jarl Torgerson, M.D., Ph.D., Claude Bouchard, Ph.D., Björn Carlsson, M.D., Ph.D., Sven Dahlgren, M.D., Ph.D., Bo Larsson, M.D., Ph.D., Kristina Narbro, Ph.D., Carl David Sjöström, M.D., Ph.D., Marianne Sullivan, Ph.D., Hans Wedel, Ph.D.. “Lifestyle, Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Risk Factors 10 Years after Bariatric Surgery.” New England Journal of Medicine. Volume 351:2683-2693, December 23, 2004.
The study also found that a significant proportion of baby boomers who are not obese are overweight.  Health experts note that if baby boomers continue with present levels of weight and physical inactivity, they are going to become expensive.  “Experts know their medical costs due to obesity-related illnesses and conditions will grow,” Slome explains.  
Respiratory problems. In obese patients, lungs decrease in size. Both the increased weight on the chest wall of obese patients and the difficulty they experience in lifting the heavy chest wall may contribute to difficulty in breathing (Wallace, Schulte, Nakeeb, & Andris, 2003). Obesity is known to induce respiratory mechanical impairment that may be combined with abnormalities in gas exchange (Zerah et al., 1993). In the obese elderly, these changes are accentuated by changes in the lung structure and function associated with normal aging. These changes in the lungs include decreased alveolar surface available for gas exchange, increased chest wall stiffness, and stiffening of the elastin and the collagen tissue supporting the lungs (Tabloski, 2006). The mass loading of the ventilator system induced by obesity alters the static balance within the respiratory system. Obese older patients often have a reduced respiratory efficiency that can reach the point of respiratory insufficiency in the presence of cardiovascular insufficiency of various degrees. The natural decrease in respiratory function in older patients exacerbates the decrease caused by obesity which may in turn lead to an increase in the sleep apnea syndrome, which, in these patients, is related to a greater risk of developing hallucinatory and cognitive disorders caused by hypoxia during sleep (Donini et al., 2006).

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Michael Spitzer, a personal trainer and author of Fitness at 40, 50, 60 and Beyond, agrees, adding that “the true path to weight control and fitness after age 60 isn’t that much different than it is at any other stage of life. However, there are certain factors that need special consideration.”
Fortunately, researchers are beginning to understand the differences between the wrong mix and a healthy one, as well as the specific factors that shape those differences. They hope to learn how to cultivate this inner ecosystem in ways that could prevent—and possibly treat—obesity, which doctors define as having a particular ratio of height and weight, known as the body mass index, that is greater than 30. Imagine, for example, foods, baby formulas or supplements devised to promote virtuous microbes while suppressing the harmful types. “We need to think about designing foods from the inside out,” suggests Jeffrey Gordon of Washington University in St. Louis. Keeping our gut microbes happy could be the elusive secret to weight control.
^ Jump up to: a b c d Poulain M, Doucet M, Major GC, Drapeau V, Sériès F, Boulet LP, Tremblay A, Maltais F (April 2006). “The effect of obesity on chronic respiratory diseases: pathophysiology and therapeutic strategies”. CMAJ. 174 (9): 1293–99. doi:10.1503/cmaj.051299. PMC 1435949 . PMID 16636330.
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NAEM’s EHS Compliance Management Conference focuses on the core of EHS responsibilities and brings together a diverse group of cross-industry EHS professionals. Attend this conference for case studies and interactive dialogue on emerging trends and issues in EHS management including EHS auditing, data management, risk management, and staffing challenges. This is the conference you won’t want to miss.
Obesity is defined as excess adipose tissue. There are several different methods for determining excess adipose (fat) tissue; the most common being the Body Mass Index (BMI) (see below). A fat cell is an endocrine cell and adipose tissue is an endocrine organ. As such, adipose tissue secretes a number of products, including metabolites, cytokines, lipids, and coagulation factors among others. Significantly, excess adiposity or obesity causes increased levels of circulating fatty acids and inflammation. This can lead to insulin resistance, which in turn can lead to type 2 diabetes.
Jump up ^ Bellows-Riecken KH, Rhodes RE (February 2008). “A birth of inactivity? A review of physical activity and parenthood”. Prev Med (Review). 46 (2): 99–110. doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2007.08.003. PMID 17919713.
In the United States, obesity is more common in black or Hispanic women than in black or Hispanic men. A person’s sex may also affect the way the body stores fat. For example, women tend to store less unhealthy fat in the abdomen than men do.
A hiatus hernia is an abnormality in which where part of the stomach protrudes through a defect in the diaphragm and up into the chest. This can increase the possibility of “reflux acid” into the oesophagus, causing heartburn and other symptoms. Obesity is a “risk factor” re. development of a hiatus hernia (Ref. http://bit.ly/wPv1w2).
More recently, investigators conducted a systematic review of 89 studies on weight-related diseases and then did a statistical summary, or meta-analysis, of the data. Of the 18 weight-related diseases they studied, diabetes was at the top of the risk list: Compared with men and women in the normal weight range (BMI lower than 25), men with BMIs of 30 or higher had a sevenfold higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, and women with BMIs of 30 or higher had a 12-fold higher risk. (4)
Jump up ^ van Baal PH, Polder JJ, de Wit GA, Hoogenveen RT, Feenstra TL, Boshuizen HC, Engelfriet PM, Brouwer WB (February 2008). “Lifetime Medical Costs of Obesity: Prevention No Cure for Increasing Health Expenditure”. PLoS Med. (Comparative Study). 5 (2): e29. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.0050029. PMC 2225430 . PMID 18254654.
As an older adult, there are special considerations to take into account if you want to lose weight. Your lifestyle may have changed over the past several years, you may be living alone and you may have medical issues to consider.
Other conditions and illnesses that are associated with both weight gain and obesity include: hyperthyroidism, Cushing’s syndrome, polycystic ovary syndrome, and depression (NIH, 2006).  The older adults who are obese are more likely than those who are not obese to report symptoms of depression, such as feelings of sadness, worthlessness, and hopelessness (Center on an Aging Society, 2003). Lack of sleep may contribute to obesity, as well as certain drugs, such as steroids and some antidepressants that may stimulate the appetite, cause water retention, or slow the metabolism rate (NIH, 2008). Finally, the complex relationship between functional ability and lifestyle patterns merits attention as a contributor to obesity (Center on an Aging Society). Joint pain, decreased mobility, and activity intolerance may lead to weight gain because of decreased activity. Older adults are more likely than younger adults to experience functional limitations associated with chronic illnesses that may begin a stress-pain-depression cycle that can result in lifestyle patterns leading obesity (Lorig et al., 2006).
A general physical exam. This includes also measuring your height; checking vital signs, such as heart rate, blood pressure and temperature; listening to your heart and lungs; and examining your abdomen.
Collaborative Group on Epidemiological Studies of Ovarian Cancer. Ovarian cancer and body size: individual participant meta-analysis including 25,157 women with ovarian cancer from 47 epidemiological studies. PLoS Medicine 2012; 9(4):e1001200.

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Eat less “energy dense foods.” Energy dense foods are high in fats and simple sugars. They generally have a high calorie value in a small amount of food. The United States government currently recommends that a healthy diet should have less than 30% fat. Fat contains twice as many calories per unit weight than protein or carbohydrates. Examples of high-energy dense foods include red meat, egg yolks, fried foods, high fat/sugar fast foods, sweets, pastries, butter, and high-fat salad dressings. Also cut down on foods that provide calories but very little nutrition, such as alcohol, non-diet soft drinks, and many packaged high-calorie snack foods.

18. Rydwik E, Lammes E, Frandin K, et al. Effects of a physical and nutritional intervention program for frail elderly people over age 75. A randomized controlled pilot treatment trial. Aging Clin Exp Res 2008;20:159–70 [PubMed]

The publication of this supplement was made possible in part by unrestricted educational grants from Eli Lilly, Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Generex Biotechnology, Hoffmann-La Roche, Johnson & Johnson, LifeScan, Medtronic, MSD, Novo Nordisk, Pfizer, sanofi-aventis, and WorldWIDE.

Overweight and obesity are linked to more deaths worldwide than underweight. Globally there are more people who are obese than underweight – this occurs in every region except parts of sub-Saharan Africa and Asia.

Eating less is a key factor in weight loss, lowering cholesterol and reducing the risk of heart disease. Even if you eat a regular diet, which for many of us is loaded with fat, the addition of Chitosan makes it a low-fat, low-calorie diet. The taste buds are happy because it tastes good, and the body is happy because less fat is absorbed.

Gastric bypass surgery is a procedure that creates a small stomach pouch to restrict food intake and constructs bypasses of the duodenum and parts of the small intestine to decrease one’s ability to absorb nutrients from food. There are two types of gastric bypass operations: Roux-en-Y and extensive gastric bypass. Patients who undergo gastric bypass surgery will need to take nutrition supplements due to limited absorption of certain vitamins and minerals.

We fund research. Our Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, which includes our Clinical Applications and Prevention Branch, funds research to understand how overweight and obesity relate to heart disease. Our Division of Lung Diseases funds research on the impact of overweight and obesity on sleep disordered breathing. The research we fund today will help improve our future health. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) to learn about research NHLBI is funding on overweight and obesity.

We used to believe that high cholesterol was the number-one risk factor. But we must look at the whole picture. Having metabolic syndrome, appropriately called “diabesity” by Dr. Mark Hyman in his book The Blood Sugar Solution and also known as prediabetes, is a greater risk factor than having high cholesterol. In fact, it’s the number one risk factor of cardiovascular disease. (To read an interview with Dr. Hyman, see the May 2013 issue of Life Extension Magazine®.)

Diet is an important factor in shaping the gut ecosystem. A diet of highly processed foods, for example, has been linked to a less diverse gut community in people. Gordon’s team demonstrated the complex interaction among food, microbes and body weight by feeding their humanized mice a specially prepared unhealthy chow that was high in fat and low in fruits, vegetables and fiber (as opposed to the usual high-fiber, low-fat mouse kibble). Given this “Western diet,” the mice with obese-type microbes proceeded to grow fat even when housed with lean cagemates. The unhealthy diet somehow prevented the virtuous bacteria from moving in and flourishing.

23. The clinical and cost-effectiveness of medical nutrition therapies: evidence and estimates of potential medical savings from the use of selected nutritional intervention. June 1996. Summary report prepared for the Nutrition Screening Initiative.

Genetic studies have found that overweight and obesity can run in families, so it is possible that our genes or DNA can cause these conditions. Research studies have found that certain DNA elements are associated with obesity.

Many Pollanites insist it will. “If the government came into these communities and installed Brita filters under their sinks, they’d drink water instead of Coke,” Lisa Powell, a professor of health policy and administration at the University of Illinois at Chicago’s Institute for Health Research and Policy, told me. But experts who actually work with the obese see a more difficult transition, especially when busy schedules are thrown into the equation. “They won’t eat broccoli instead of french fries,” says Kelli Drenner, an obesity researcher at Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches, Texas, which has about four fast-food restaurants per block along most of its main drag. “You try to make even a small change to school lunches, and parents and kids revolt.”

Often, you’ll be able to find senior-focused classes offered at local swimming pools, but if not, even just starting off by walking around the pool and doing some mild stretches can make a huge differences.

45. Larrieu S, Pérès K, Letenneur L, Berr C, Dartigues JF, Ritchie K, Février B, Alpérovitch A, Barberger-Gateau P: Relationship between body mass index and different domains of disability in older persons: the 3C study. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 2004; 28: 1555– 1560 [PubMed]

Gordon theorizes that the gut community in obese mice has certain “job vacancies” for microbes that perform key roles in maintaining a healthy body weight and normal metabolism. His studies, as well as those by other researchers, offer enticing clues about what those roles might be. Compared with the thin mice, for example, Gordon’s fat mice had higher levels in their blood and muscles of substances known as branched-chain amino acids and acylcarnitines. Both these chemicals are typically elevated in people with obesity and type 2 diabetes.

It’s never too late to get healthy and improve your quality of life. For some older adults, this means losing weight. But what is the best diet plan for seniors? And how do you start an exercise program if you’ve never been active?

Jump up ^ Aune, D; Norat, T; Vatten, LJ (December 2014). “Body mass index and the risk of gout: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies”. European Journal of Nutrition. 53 (8): 1591–601. doi:10.1007/s00394-014-0766-0. PMID 25209031.

In fact, more than half of boomers polled say they regularly do mental exercises such as crossword puzzles. Some also take fish oil, a type of fatty acid that some studies suggest might help prevent mental decline.

The principal goal of the fat acceptance movement is to decrease discrimination against people who are overweight and obese.[219][220] However, some in the movement are also attempting to challenge the established relationship between obesity and negative health outcomes.[221]

4. Calhoun DA, Jones D, Textor S, Goff DC, Murphy TP, Toto RD, White A, Cushman WC, White W, Sica D, Ferdinand K, Giles TD, Falkner B, Carey RM: American Heart Association Professional Education Committee Resistant hypertension: diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association Professional Education Committee of the Council for High Blood Pressure Research. Circulation 2008; 117: e510– e526 [PubMed]

“Obesity has become the new smoking—it’s a major driver of ill health, with coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes highest on the list of preventable illnesses. Obesity also costs billions of dollars to our economy each year. Anything we can do to mitigate the damage being done to both generations of Australians by obesity will be hugely important for the future of our nation.”

Updated by: Laura J. Martin, MD, MPH, ABIM Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

Jump up ^ Carmienke, S; Freitag, M H; Pischon, T; Schlattmann, P; Fankhaenel, T; Goebel, H; Gensichen, J (20 March 2013). “General and abdominal obesity parameters and their combination in relation to mortality: a systematic review and meta-regression analysis”. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 67 (6): 573–85. doi:10.1038/ejcn.2013.61.

A prospective study evaluated 101 patients (inpatient and outpatient) with an average age of 64 years and unintentional weight loss of at least 5% within six to 12 months.12 Baseline evaluation included a comprehensive history and physical examination, the laboratory studies mentioned in the previous paragraph except for fecal occult blood testing, and abdominal ultrasonography and ferritin measurement. After baseline evaluation, the etiology of unintentional weight was established in 73 patients (72%). Organic disease was identified in 57 patients, and 16 patients had a psychiatric diagnosis. More importantly, all of the 22 patients with malignant disease had abnormal results in the baseline assessment. Tests with the highest yield (i.e., typically abnormal in the setting of organic disease) were C-reactive protein, hemoglobin, lactate dehydrogenase, and albumin measurements. None of the 25 patients with negative findings on baseline evaluation had a malignancy on additional workup, such as computed tomography, endoscopy, colonoscopy, magnetic resonance imaging, or radionuclide examinations. Therefore, the authors concluded that if baseline test results are normal, further workup is not necessary, and close observation for three to six months is justified.11,12

Greenberger NJ, et al. Treatment of obesity: The impact of bariatric surgery. In:  Current Diagnosis & Treatment: Gastroenterology, Hepatology, & Endoscopy. 2nd ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2012. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed March 9, 2015.

Cancer: Obesity can increase your risk for certaincancers such as colon, endometrial, breast, and gallbladder. Obese and overweight women have two to four times the risk of developing endometrial cancer, regardless of their menopausal status.

Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) is a condition in which an inability to breathe deeply enough and quickly enough results in a low level of oxygen and a high level of carbon dioxide in the blood.

If you’re in your 50s, and you plan to lose a significant amount of weight it is essential to contact a doctor’s office first to confirm your chosen route is safe and will not conflict with any medication you are already on. Consult with the specialists from Forest Healthcare and you might just be on the right path to losing weight effectively in our 50s.

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Obesity has been reported to be the single greatest cause of disability for seniors, and it’s expected to put a great strain on the U.S. healthcare system in the coming years. It can lead to heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and osteoarthritis, among other conditions and diseases. Experts consider obesity one of the greatest health challenges of the 21st century.

Reexamination of the impact of obesity on health in older individuals disclosed two potential benefits of weight excess: decreased osteoporosis and better survival of obese subjects with certain health hazards, known as the “obesity paradox.” Obesity, linked to increased bone mineral density, is thus far uncontested, as is the fact that this also translates into a lower rate of hip fractures in elderly obese subjects (10). The latter may reflect not only greater bone resilience, but also cushioning by adipose tissue during falls. An important emerging exception to this general protective effect of obesity on bone is the recent finding that although men and women with the metabolic syndrome do indeed enjoy better total hip and femoral neck bone mineral density in a cross-sectional analysis, these associations do not translate to improved clinical outcome. In fact, incident clinical fractures were 2.6 times more likely to occur in subjects with the metabolic syndrome compared with participants without the metabolic syndrome after an average follow-up of 2 years (11).

The food industry calls the rules government overreach. Felipe Lira, the director of Chilealimentos, an industry association, said the new nutrition labels were confusing and “invasive,” and that the marketing restrictions were based on a scientifically flawed correlation between the promotion of unhealthy foods and weight gain. “We believe that the best way to approach the problem of obesity is through consumer education that changes people’s habits,” he said in an emailed statement.

A group in Amsterdam, meanwhile, is investigating whether transferring feces from lean to overweight people will lead to weight loss. U.S. researchers tend to view such “fecal transplants” as imprecise and risky. A more promising approach, says Robert Karp, who oversees National Institutes of Health grants related to obesity and the microbiome, is to identify the precise strains of bacteria associated with leanness, determine their roles and develop treatments accordingly. Gordon has proposed enriching foods with beneficial bacteria and any nutrients needed to establish them in the gut—a science-based version of today’s probiotic yogurts. No one in the field believes that probiotics alone will win the war on obesity, but it seems that, along with exercising and eating right, we need to enlist our inner microbial army.

nursing considerations Nursing interventions are aimed at reinforcement of long-term life-style changes, including a balanced diet and regular exercise. Instruction is aimed at developing mutually agreed-on diet and exercise goals and successful management of blood pressure, lipid levels, and glucose levels.

During the Renaissance some of the upper class began flaunting their large size, as can be seen in portraits of Henry VIII of England and Alessandro dal Borro.[15] Rubens (1577–1640) regularly depicted full-bodied women in his pictures, from which derives the term Rubenesque. These women, however, still maintained the “hourglass” shape with its relationship to fertility.[199] During the 19th century, views on obesity changed in the Western world. After centuries of obesity being synonymous with wealth and social status, slimness began to be seen as the desirable standard.[15]

A hiatus hernia is an abnormality in which where part of the stomach protrudes through a defect in the diaphragm and up into the chest. This can increase the possibility of “reflux acid” into the oesophagus, causing heartburn and other symptoms. Obesity is a “risk factor” re. development of a hiatus hernia (Ref. http://bit.ly/wPv1w2).

The study also showed that obesity rates were consistently higher among women and African-Americans than for men and whites. For example, among people aged 20-29, 20% of whites and 35% of African-Americans were obese.

The point is not to try to scare him into losing weight but just to understand the consequences. If he could lose weight, he already would have; he has probably tried numerous times and failed. Understanding that he has a problem he he has not been able to fix will help you be more supportive.

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While losing weight is a simple concept in theory — expend more calories than you take in — it is a more complex process in reality. But for seniors, the “battle of the bulge” can be even harder to the natural slowing down of the metabolism. In other words, a 65-year-old might eat the same meal he ate at age 20 and yet burn calories at a slower rate. This can be confusing and frustrating for seniors as they watch the pounds creep up on the scale.

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There are many different types of strength training exercises and a variety of equipment that can be used, including weight-training machines, dumbbells, resistance bands, medicine balls, or weighted bars.

Jump up ^ LeFevre, Michael L. (26 August 2014). “Behavioral Counseling to Promote a Healthful Diet and Physical Activity for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in Adults With Cardiovascular Risk Factors: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement”. Annals of Internal Medicine. 161 (8): 587–93. doi:10.7326/M14-1796. PMID 25155419.

For older adults, being mildly overweight causes little harm, physicians say. But too much weight is especially hazardous for an aging body. Obesity increases inflammation, exacerbates bone and muscle loss and significantly raises the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes.

In 1850, the average man had a normal body mass index (BMI) of 23. Fast forward to 2000, and the male frame elongated and ballooned to a BMI of 28.2, teetering on the brink of obesity [source: Kolata]. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), adults aged 40 to 59 — aka baby boomers — have the highest prevalence of obesity. Of that group, 40 percent of men and 41 percent of women were obese in 2007 [source: CDC]. Their parents, however, had a lower overall obesity rate.

Sex: Men have more muscle than women, on average. Because muscle burns more calories than other types of tissue, men use more calories than women, even at rest. Thus, women are more likely than men to gain weight with the same calorie intake.

It may be beneficial to involve a social worker and/or a dietitian depending on the specific circumstances. This is particularly true if no identifiable conditions are contributing to malnutrition or if the senior is living in poverty. Sedentary seniors should be encouraged to become more active, as exercise is a powerful appetite stimulant.

Recent research has shown that obesity rates have doubled among adults and tripled among children in the U.S., and researchers say more study is needed to understand how these trends will affect life expectancy and obesity-related diseases like diabetes and heart disease.

This review excluded 11% of the retrieved references because they were not written in English. The overall quality of the literature retrieved was low. As a result, there is insufficient evidence to support the routine use of either nutritional interventions or pharmacologic treatments to help address unintentional weight loss. High-quality, adequately powered trials are needed to determine what interventions are effective at addressing unintentional weight loss and the associated clinical outcomes, such as mortality.

Doctors may also note how a person carries excess weight on his or her body. Studies have shown that this factor may indicate whether or not an individual has a predisposition to develop certain diseases or conditions that may accompany obesity. “Apple-shaped” individuals who store most of their weight around the waist and abdomen are at greater risk for cancer, heart disease, stroke, and diabetes than “pear-shaped” people whose extra pounds settle primarily in their hips and thighs.

Contributors: Svetlana Stajkovic and Jayna Holroyd-Leduc developed the concept of the review. Elizabeth Aitken conducted the literature search. All of the authors reviewed and critically appraised the literature cited in the manuscript. Svetlana Stajkovic drafted the article, and all of the authors revised the manuscript critically for important intellectual content and approved the final version submitted for publishing.

SOURCES: Dennis T. Villareal, M.D., professor, medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, and staff physician, Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center, Houston; Miriam Nelson, director, Sustainability Institute, University of New Hampshire, Durham; May 17, 2017, New England Journal of Medicine

Feeling full on less. The concept of energy density can help you satisfy your hunger with fewer calories. All foods have a certain number of calories within a given amount (volume). Some foods — such as desserts, candies, fats and processed foods — are high in energy density. This means that a small volume of that food has a large number of calories. In contrast, other foods, such as fruits and vegetables, have lower energy density. These foods provide a larger portion size with a fewer number of calories. By eating larger portions of foods that have fewer calories, you reduce hunger pangs, take in fewer calories and feel better about your meal, which contributes to how satisfied you feel overall.

Munsell MF, Sprague BL, Berry DA, Chisholm G, Trentham-Dietz A. Body mass index and breast cancer risk according to postmenopausal estrogen-progestin use and hormone receptor status. Epidemiologic Reviews 2014; 36:114-136.

If you’re in your 50s, and you plan to lose a significant amount of weight it is essential to contact a doctor’s office first to confirm your chosen route is safe and will not conflict with any medication you are already on. Consult with the specialists from Forest Healthcare and you might just be on the right path to losing weight effectively in our 50s.

The study looked closely at two types of disability known to be key to managing independently: the inability to carry out daily tasks such as shopping, cooking meals, managing money, and making phone calls (called instrumental activities of daily living); and the need for help with personal care activities such as bathing, dressing, and getting in or out of bed (called activities of daily living).

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Gastric bypass surgery. In gastric bypass (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass), the surgeon creates a small pouch at the top of your stomach. The small intestine is then cut a short distance below the main stomach and connected to the new pouch. Food and liquid flow directly from the pouch into this part of the intestine, bypassing most of your stomach.

An association between viruses and obesity has been found in humans and several different animal species. The amount that these associations may have contributed to the rising rate of obesity is yet to be determined.[147]

Aerobic exercise can lead to improved cardiovascular function, better quality of sleep, improved mental health, weight loss, and enhanced immune function. Suggested aerobic activities for older adults include low-impact exercises such as walking, biking, low-impact aerobics, and water activities such as swimming or water aerobics.

“Boomers and Gen X together make up more than 75% of Australia’s workforce. Their health and the role of the workplace in promoting a healthy, or unhealthy, environment is of critical importance to the Australian economy, to society and to people’s quality of life,” Pilkington says.

Obesity is a serious, chronic disease that can have a negative effect on many systems in your body. People who are overweight or obese have a much greater risk of developing serious conditions, including:

The International Size Acceptance Association (ISAA) is a non-governmental organization (NGO) which was founded in 1997. It has more of a global orientation and describes its mission as promoting size acceptance and helping to end weight-based discrimination.[224] These groups often argue for the recognition of obesity as a disability under the US Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA). The American legal system, however, has decided that the potential public health costs exceed the benefits of extending this anti-discrimination law to cover obesity.[221]

Television food shows routinely feature revered chefs tossing around references to healthy eating, “wellness,” and farm-fresh ingredients, all the while spooning lard, cream, and sugar over everything in sight. (A study published last year in the British Medical Journal found that the recipes in the books of top TV chefs call for “significantly more” fat per portion than what’s contained in ready-to-eat supermarket meals.) Corporate wellness programs, one of the most promising avenues for getting the population to adopt healthy behaviors, are falling prey to this way of thinking as well. Last November, I attended a stress-management seminar for employees of a giant consulting company, and listened to a high-powered professional wellness coach tell the crowded room that it’s okay to eat anything as long as its plant or animal origins aren’t obscured by processing. Thus, she explained, potato chips are perfectly healthy, because they plainly come from potatoes, but Cheetos will make you sick and fat, because what plant or animal is a Cheeto? (For the record, typical potato chips and Cheetos have about equally nightmarish amounts of fat calories per ounce; Cheetos have fewer carbs, though more salt.)

The benefit also can’t be used by endocrinologists, who might be managing a person’s diabetes, or by cardiologists, who monitor patients with heart disease. Both conditions can be caused or made worse by excess weight.

Jump up ^ Zhang, Y; Proenca, R; Maffei, M; Barone, M; Leopold, L; Friedman, JM (Dec 1, 1994). “Positional cloning of the mouse obese gene and its human homologue”. Nature (Research Support). 372 (6505): 425–32. Bibcode:1994Natur.372..425Z. doi:10.1038/372425a0. PMID 7984236.

Dennis T. Villareal, Suresh Chode, Nehu Parimi, David R. Sinacore, Tiffany Hilton, Reina Armamento-Villareal, Nicola Napoli, Clifford Qualls, Krupa Shah. Weight Loss, Exercise, or Both and Physical Function in Obese Older Adults. New England Journal of Medicine, 2011; 364 (13): 1218 DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1008234

Obesity is most commonly caused by a combination of excessive food intake, lack of physical activity, and genetic susceptibility.[1][4] A few cases are caused primarily by genes, endocrine disorders, medications, or mental disorder.[9] The view that obese people eat little yet gain weight due to a slow metabolism is not generally supported.[10] On average, obese people have a greater energy expenditure than their normal counterparts due to the energy required to maintain an increased body mass.[10][11]

A third approach to obesity treatment involves research into the social factors that encourage or reinforce weight gain in humans. Researchers are looking at such issues as the advertising and marketing of food products; media stereotypes of obesity; the development of eating disorders in adolescents and adults; and similar questions.

This is a combination drug of naltrexone (an opioid antagonist) and bupropion HCL (an antidepressant medication that is an inhibitor of the reuptake of dopamine and norepinephrine). The main side effects observed with this medication are nausea, constipation, and headaches. The medication is contraindicated in patients with uncontrolled hypertension or a history of seizures.

A population-based study using BMI and cancer incidence data from the GLOBOCAN project estimated that, in 2012 in the United States, about 28,000 new cases of cancer in men (3.5%) and 72,000 in women (9.5%) were due to overweight or obesity (32). The percentage of cases attributed to overweight or obesity varied widely for different cancer types but was as high as 54% for gallbladder cancer in women and 44% for esophageal adenocarcinoma in men.

A general physical exam. This includes also measuring your height; checking vital signs, such as heart rate, blood pressure and temperature; listening to your heart and lungs; and examining your abdomen.

1. Contact your local Area Agency on Aging. Federal, state and local resources can help families with caregiving, housing and other elder issues. Even if you can’t find a home who will accept your loved one, you may be able to get assistance in other ways — such as an expert in-home caregiver.

Heart-healthy eating. Learn about which foods and nutrients are part of a healthy eating pattern. It’s important to eat the right amount of calories to maintain a healthy weight. If you need to lose weight, try to reduce your total daily calories gradually. Use the Body Weight Planner to find out your daily calorie needs and to set goals. Visit healthy recipes and plan for success. Talk with your doctor before beginning any diet or eating plan. Visit Chose My Plate or 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans for more information.

Most of the evidence about obesity in cancer survivors comes from people who were diagnosed with breast, prostate, or colorectal cancer. Research indicates that obesity may worsen several aspects of cancer survivorship, including quality of life, cancer recurrence, cancer progression, and prognosis (survival) (37, 38).

Kay Paggi, GCM, LPC, CGC, MA, is in private practice as a geriatric care manager and is on the advisory board for the Emeritus Program at Richland College. She has worked with seniors for nearly 20 years as a licensed professional counselor, certified gerontological counselor, and certified geriatric care manager.

Heart disease is a term used to describe several problems that may affect your heart. The most common type of problem happens when a blood vessel that carries blood to the heart becomes hard and narrow. This may keep the heart from getting all the blood it needs. Other problems may affect how well the heart pumps. If you have heart disease, you may suffer from a heart attack, heart failure, sudden cardiac death, angina (chest pain), or abnormal heart rhythm. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States.3

Shah K, Armamento-Villareal R, Parimi N, Chode S, Sinacore DR, Hilton TN, Napoli N, Qualls C, Villareal DT. Exercise training in obese older adults prevents increase in bone turnover and attenuates decrease in hip bone mineral density induced by weight loss despite decline in bone-active hormones. J Bone Miner Res. 2011;26:2851–2859. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

When working with obese clients, be sure that the equipment can accommodate their weight. Most manufacturers provide a weight limit in the product manual; if they do not, contact them to ascertain the weight limit for each piece of equipment that heavier clients will use. Free-weight exercises that require lifting dumbbells instead barbells from the floor to start an exercise may be easier. The width of the free-weight bar may also be too narrow to allow proper performance of exercises such as the biceps curl and back squat, indicating the need to use an Olympic-size bar, which is longer. Additional consideration should be given to selecting machine equipment that will be easy for overweight clients to get into and out of, and to avoiding some floor exercises (e.g., crunches, modified push-ups, stretching) that require clients to get down and up. If arthritis or joint pain is present, consider alternating the strength training exercises with lower-impact activities such as elliptical machines and stationary cycling activities or swimming. Regardless of the equipment used or the exercises being performed, programs for overweight and obese clients should include exercises that can be performed correctly and that clients feel more comfortable performing.

Any any age, successful, sustainable weight loss takes time. “It needs to be a permanent change” to reap the benefits, Beavers says. The Acostas, who still eat and exercise the way they did when they were enrolled in the program, learned that firsthand. “It becomes a life change,” Elena Acosta says. “I could not go back to what I was doing before.”

The principal goal of the fat acceptance movement is to decrease discrimination against people who are overweight and obese.[219][220] However, some in the movement are also attempting to challenge the established relationship between obesity and negative health outcomes.[221]

Arthritis and osteoarthritis. Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in older adults. A high body mass index (BMI) is an associated risk factor for knee osteoarthritis (OA) in older persons (Villareal et al., 2005). By 65 years of age the prevalence of osteoarthritis is 68% in women and 58% in men. This age-related increase in the prevalence of OA may reflect bodily changes as a result of a lifetime of being overweight which results in strain on weight-bearing joints (Villareal et al.).

Texas law prohibits hospitals from practicing medicine. The physicians on the Methodist Health System medical staff are independent practitioners who are not employees or agents of Methodist Dallas Medical Center, Methodist Health System, or any of its affiliated hospitals.

Environment plays a key role in shaping an individual’s habits and lifestyle. There are many environmental influences that can impact your health decisions. Today’s society has developed a more sedentary lifestyle. Walking has been replaced by driving cars, physical activity has been replaced by technology and nutrition has been overcome by convenience foods.

Jump up ^ Molenaar EA, Numans ME, van Ameijden EJ, Grobbee DE (November 2008). “[Considerable comorbidity in overweight adults: results from the Utrecht Health Project]”. Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd (English abstract) (in Dutch). 152 (45): 2457–63. PMID 19051798.

There are more than 40 medical conditions that are associated with obesity. Individuals who have obesity are risk of developing one or more of these serious medical conditions. The most prevalent obesity-related diseases include:

HASfit offers health, fitness and nutritional information and is designed for educational purposes only. You should not rely on this information as a substitute for, nor does it replace, professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. If you have any concerns or questions about your health, you should always consult with a physician or other health-care professional. Do not disregard, avoid or delay obtaining medical or health related advice from your health-care professional because of something you may have read on this site. The use of any information provided on this site is solely at your own risk.

Portion sizes of less healthy foods and beverages have increased over time in restaurants, grocery stores, and vending machines. Research shows that children eat more without realizing it if they are served larger portions. This means they are consuming a lot of extra calories, especially when eating high-calorie foods.

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Dietary modification is the cornerstone of treating cardiovascular disease in older adults who are obese. Grundy (2004) has described obesity as a major underlying factor contributing to atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) and a factor associated with multiple other ASCVD risk factors, including elevated blood pressure, hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoproteins, high cholesterol, and high fasting plasma glucose. It is also a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Even though there is a strong association between obesity and ASCVD, the relationship underlying the mechanism is not well understood. The fact that obesity acts on so many metabolic pathways, producing so many potential risk factors, makes it challenging to delineate the specific mechanism by which obesity contributes to ASCVD. Gundy suggested that the fundamental question for controlling cardiovascular diseases related to obesity is: how can we intervene at the public health level to reduce the high prevalence of obesity in the general population. He added that indeed, “This approach offers the greatest possibility for reducing the cardiovascular risk that accompanies obesity” (p. 2600). The widely disseminated Healthy People 2010 (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, n.d.) challenges individuals, communities, professionals, and indeed all of us, to take specific steps to reduce obesity to ensure that good health, as well as long life, are enjoyed by all. Dietary modification is the cornerstone of treating cardiovascular disease in older adults who are obese. Interventions to decrease obesity are presented in the next section titled, “Interventions to Address Obesity.”

Your whole body feels it, from your joints to your heart, blood pressure, blood sugar, and other systems. The extra fat cells produce inflammation and various hormones, which boosts your odds of chronic medical conditions.

“We wanted to tease apart the effects of dieting and exercise in older people who are obese,” says principal investigator Dennis T. Villareal, MD, adjunct associate professor of medicine at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. “In older adults, obesity exacerbates declines in physical performance and leads to frailty, impaired quality of life and increases in nursing home admissions. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity even among older people, it is important to find ways to combat the problem and help seniors remain healthier and more independent.”

Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Kidney cancer: People who are overweight or obese are nearly twice as likely as normal-weight people to develop renal cell cancer, the most common form of kidney cancer (13). The association of renal cell cancer with obesity is independent of its association with high blood pressure, a known risk factor for kidney cancer (14).

Poor eating habits and inactivity add up weight gain. If left unchecked, this often leads to excessive weight gain and obesity — both of which are linked with a number of health complications. Seniors, in particular, are at risk for clinical consequences, including type 2 diabetes, arthritis, urinary incontinence and even depression, according to an article published in the British Medical Bulletin.

8. Atti AR, Palmer K, Volpato S, Winblad B, De Ronchi D, Fratiglioni L: Late-life body mass index and dementia incidence: nine-year follow-up data from the Kungsholmen Project. J Am Geriatr Soc 2008; 56: 111– 116 [PubMed]

Meat is a concentrated form of calories that can pack on the pounds if not eaten in the right portions. Choosing one or more days a week to go vegetarian can help lower the caloric load of the day, giving your body a chance to burn off excess fat. When going vegetarian, don’t just substitute with cheese, which is equally rich in fat. Instead, opt for low calorie veggies like mushrooms or soy based tofu.

Jump up ^ Hales, Craig M.; Carroll, Margaret D.; Fryar, Cheryl D.; Ogden, Cynthia L. (October 2017). “Prevalence of Obesity Among Adults and Youth: United States, 2015–2016”. NCHS data brief (288): 1–8. ISSN 1941-4927. PMID 29155689.

1. Ogden CL, Carroll MD, McDowell MA, Flegal KM. Obesity among adults in the United States— no change since 2003–2004. NCHS data brief no 1. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2007 http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/index.html

Meningioma: The risk of this slow-growing brain tumor that arises in the membranes surrounding the brain and the spinal cord is increased by about 50% in people who are obese and about 20% in people who are overweight (16).

Researchers interviewed over one thousand men and women who were born between 1946 and 1964.  According to their findings over a fourth (28%) said the worst thing about getting older are changes that occur in their physical ability.  Being physically independent and being able to pay for medical costs is a major concern. 

There are no specific symptoms of overweight and obesity. The signs of overweight and obesity include a high body mass index (BMI) and an unhealthy body fat distribution that can be estimated by measuring your waist circumference. Obesity can cause complications in many parts of your body.  

At what stage of life a person becomes obese can affect his or her ability to lose weight. In childhood, excess calories are converted into new fat cells (hyperplastic obesity), while excess calories consumed in adulthood only serve to expand existing fat cells (hypertrophic obesity). Since dieting and exercise can only reduce the size of fat cells, not eliminate them, persons who were obese as children can have great difficulty losing weight, since they may have up to five times as many fat cells as someone who became overweight as an adult.

To begin with the second part, I suggest that you look for a physician in your community that addresses weight and diet issues. Your father cannot see his weight as a problem because he cannot consider the possibility of living without whatever need the food is meeting. He shold be checked medically for metabolic conditions, such as diabetes and body chemistry imbalances. You can hire an ambulance service that transports wheelchair patients to take him to the doctor.

Age. Obesity can occur at any age, even in young children. But as you age, hormonal changes and a less active lifestyle increase your risk of obesity. In addition, the amount of muscle in your body tends to decrease with age. This lower muscle mass leads to a decrease in metabolism. These changes also reduce calorie needs, and can make it harder to keep off excess weight. If you don’t consciously control what you eat and become more physically active as you age, you’ll likely gain weight.

Another job vacancy associated with obesity might be one normally filled by a stomach bacterium called Helicobacter pylori. Research by Martin Blaser of New York University suggests that it helps to regulate appetite by modulating levels of ghrelin—a hunger-stimulating hormone. H. pylori was once abundant in the American digestive tract but is now rare, thanks to more hygienic living conditions and the use of antibiotics, says Blaser, author of a new book entitled Missing Microbes.

Obesity has reached epic proportions in the U.S. Rates of obesity have gone up from 12 to 20 percent of the population since 1991. This epidemic is not limited to adults; the percentage of young people who are overweight has more than doubled in the past 20 years. Sixteen percent of children and adolescents between 6 and 19 years old are considered overweight.

Several parts of your body, such as your stomach, intestines, pancreas, and fat tissue, use hormones to control how your brain decides if you are hungry or full. Some of these hormones are insulin, leptin, glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1), peptide YY, and ghrelin.

The area I found that’s most chockablock with commercial food options brackets the busy intersection of two main streets. However, like most areas I passed through nearby, this food scene was dominated not by fast-food restaurants but by bodegas (which, like most other types of convenience stores, are usually considered part of the low-income, food-desert landscape). I went into several of these mom-and-pop shops and saw pretty much the same thing in every one: A prominent display of extremely fatty-looking beef and pork, most of it fresh, though gigantic strips of fried pork skin often got pride of place. A lot of canned and boxed foods. Up front, shelves of candy and heavily processed snacks. A large set of display cases filled mostly with highly sugared beverages. And a small refrigerator case somewhere in the back sparsely populated with not-especially-fresh-looking fruits and vegetables. The bodega industry, too, seems to have plotted to addict communities to fat, sugar, and salt—unless, that is, they’re simply providing the foods that people like.

“Most of the long-term care provided to older people today comes from unpaid family members and friends,” Richard Suzman, director of National Institute on Aging’s division of behavioral and social research, said in a statement. “Baby boomers had far fewer children than their parents. Combined with higher divorce rates and disrupted family structures, this will result in fewer family members to provide long-term care in the future.”

Overweight and obesity are major risk factors for a number of chronic diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer and while it was once an issue only in high income countries, overweight and obesity has now dramatically risen in low- and middle-income countries.Such countries are now facing a “double burden” of disease, for while they continue to deal with the problems of infectious disease and under-nutrition, they are also experiencing a rapid upsurge in chronic disease risk such as obesity and overweight, particularly in urban settings.

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Where the Pollanites get into real trouble—where their philosophy becomes so glib and wrongheaded that it is actually immoral—is in the claim that their style of food shopping and eating is the answer to the country’s weight problem. Helping me to indulge my taste for genuinely healthy wholesome foods are the facts that I’m relatively affluent and well educated, and that I’m surrounded by people who tend to take care with what they eat. Not only am I within a few minutes’ drive of three Whole Foods and two Trader Joe’s, I’m within walking distance of two other supermarkets and more than a dozen restaurants that offer bountiful healthy-eating options.
That means more Americans are getting heavier earlier in their lives and carrying the extra pounds for longer periods of time, which suggests that the impact for chronic disease and life expectancy may be worse than previously thought.
Every time your heart beats, it pumps blood through your arteries to the rest of your body. Blood pressure is how hard your blood pushes against the walls of your arteries. High blood pressure (hypertension) usually has no symptoms, but it may cause serious problems, such as heart disease, stroke, and kidney failure.
The Pollanites didn’t invent resistance to healthier popular foods, as the fates of the McLean Deluxe and Olestra demonstrate, but they’ve greatly intensified it. Fast food and junk food have their core customer base, and the wholesome-food gurus have theirs. In between sit many millions of Americans—the more the idea that processed food should be shunned no matter what takes hold in this group, the less incentive fast-food joints will have to continue edging away from the fat- and problem-carb-laden fare beloved by their most loyal customers to try to broaden their appeal.
In this study, Villareal and his colleagues evaluated the effects of dieting and exercise in more than 100 obese seniors over a one-year period. Although weight loss alone and exercise alone improved physical function by about 12 percent and 15 percent, respectively, neither was as effective as diet and exercise together, which improved physical performance by 21 percent.
W. B. Droyvold, T. I. Lund Nilsen, S. Lydersen, K. Midthjel, P. M. Nilsson, J. Nilsson, J. Holmen; “Weight change and mortality: the Nord-Trondelag Health Study.” Journal of Internal Medicine. Volume 257 Issue 4, Pages 338 – 345
I have two people I am taking care of, My sister who has progressive brain damage from radiation for brain cancer and my Mother who has Scleroderma with Pulmonary Hypertension and gastroparesis as side effects of the Scleroderma. My Sister can be very manipulative, but I think a lot of it is based on fear and we are working on one thing at a time. One thing is that the suggestions you have been given are really good. I would focus on one change at a time. Maybe first focus on providing your dad with a healthier diet by getting a referral to a nutritionist from his doctor. Secondly see about getting transportation via cabulance or public disabled access. Secondly see about getting him a power chair to help with mobility and getting him more freedom. Also there is an exercise program called “Sit and Be Fit” which you can find online and it is exercise program for people who use wheelchairs or have limited mobility. The urinal is a good idea or even asking for his doctor to order a commode which can be by his bedside will help as well. One thing is that everyone has to be on the same page. If you all are thinking you have a better idea then it won’t work. Also since a lot of your dad’s behavior or refusal to try things may be fear based it is important to encourage him. Take one step at a time. I wish you the best.
BMI is a calculated value and approximates the body’s fat percentage. Actually measuring a person’s body fat percentage is not easy and is often inaccurate if the methods are not monitored carefully. The following methods require special equipment, trained personnel, can be costly, and some are only available in certain research facilities.
As sure as Jesus’s words proved prescient about the adoption of Christianity in the empire that killed him, so too the modern-day legend of King writes itself in real time. In the official story told to children, King’s assassination is the transformational tragedy in a victorious struggle to overcome.
Increased physical activity or exercise is an essential part of obesity treatment. Most people who are able to maintain their weight loss for more than a year get regular exercise, even simply walking.
Psychosocial effects – In a culture where often the ideal of physical attractiveness is to be overly thin, people who are overweight or obese frequently suffer disadvantages. Overweight and obese persons are often blamed for their condition and may be considered to be lazy or weak-willed. It is not uncommon for overweight or obese conditions to result in persons having lower incomes or having fewer or no romantic relationships. Disapproval of overweight persons expressed by some individuals may progress to bias, discrimination, and even torment.
Television food shows routinely feature revered chefs tossing around references to healthy eating, “wellness,” and farm-fresh ingredients, all the while spooning lard, cream, and sugar over everything in sight. (A study published last year in the British Medical Journal found that the recipes in the books of top TV chefs call for “significantly more” fat per portion than what’s contained in ready-to-eat supermarket meals.) Corporate wellness programs, one of the most promising avenues for getting the population to adopt healthy behaviors, are falling prey to this way of thinking as well. Last November, I attended a stress-management seminar for employees of a giant consulting company, and listened to a high-powered professional wellness coach tell the crowded room that it’s okay to eat anything as long as its plant or animal origins aren’t obscured by processing. Thus, she explained, potato chips are perfectly healthy, because they plainly come from potatoes, but Cheetos will make you sick and fat, because what plant or animal is a Cheeto? (For the record, typical potato chips and Cheetos have about equally nightmarish amounts of fat calories per ounce; Cheetos have fewer carbs, though more salt.)
When working with obese clients, be sure that the equipment can accommodate their weight. Most manufacturers provide a weight limit in the product manual; if they do not, contact them to ascertain the weight limit for each piece of equipment that heavier clients will use. Free-weight exercises that require lifting dumbbells instead barbells from the floor to start an exercise may be easier. The width of the free-weight bar may also be too narrow to allow proper performance of exercises such as the biceps curl and back squat, indicating the need to use an Olympic-size bar, which is longer. Additional consideration should be given to selecting machine equipment that will be easy for overweight clients to get into and out of, and to avoiding some floor exercises (e.g., crunches, modified push-ups, stretching) that require clients to get down and up. If arthritis or joint pain is present, consider alternating the strength training exercises with lower-impact activities such as elliptical machines and stationary cycling activities or swimming. Regardless of the equipment used or the exercises being performed, programs for overweight and obese clients should include exercises that can be performed correctly and that clients feel more comfortable performing.
It’s commonly known and scientifically proven that obesity can contribute to many diseases. In fact, the majority of organs and body systems are negatively affected by obesity. Most commonly, obesity may help bring on hypertension, high cholesterol, heart disease, and certain cancers. The increase in people with type 2 diabetes is of particular concern, as diabetes is a well-known risk factor in heart disease, kidney disease, stroke, and other serious medical conditions. Physical disability and mobility can also be a major problem due to the effect of weight on joints.
Too much weight is especially hazardous for an aging body. Obesity exacerbates bone and muscle loss, increases inflammation and significantly raises the risk of diabetes, heart disease and stroke. Excess weight also increases the risk of developing chronic diseases, losing the ability to walk or dying earlier.
If you are Asian, your health may be at risk if you have a BMI of 27.5 or higher and you have unhealthy eating patterns and too little physical activity. Also, health problems are seen with a smaller waist size. In Asian women, a waist size of 32 in. (80 cm) or more raises the chance for disease. In Asian men, a waist size of 36 in. (90 cm) or more raises the chance for disease.2
Exercise is important no matter the dog’s age. It might be difficult for your dog to get up and go for a walk if he is overweight and suffering from joint pains due to extra weight but every little counts. Even if you just play fetch for a few minutes, it will have a positive effect on your dog’s journey to weight-loss.
Among all the duds—the desperate and depressed and not-quite-divorced—a 45-year-old man named Richie Peterson stood out. He was a career naval officer, an Afghanistan veteran who was finishing his doctorate in political science at the University of Minnesota. When Missi “liked” his profile, he sent her a message right away and called her afternoon. They talked about their kids (he had two; she had three), their divorces, their sobriety. Richie told her he was on vacation in Hawaii, but they planned to meet up as soon as he got back.
All subjects in the study were over 65, with some as old as 85 when the study began. Their average age was about 70. Volunteers were randomly assigned to one of four groups. One set of seniors was placed on a low-calorie diet to help them lose weight. Members of a second group attended exercise sessions three times a week, doing balance work, resistance training and aerobic exercise. A third group combined both the low-calorie diet and the exercise. The last group made no changes in diet or exercise habits.
Villareal and his team also surveyed study subjects about their quality of life, and again, those in the combined diet-exercise group had the biggest improvements. Their scores improved by 15 percent, compared to 14 percent in the diet-only group and 10 percent in the exercise-only group. By every measure, strength, balance and gait all showed the most consistent improvement in the diet-exercise group.
Studies show that people who keep track of what they eat are better at losing weight. Keep a notebook where you can write down everything you eat and drink each day. You may be surprised to see how much you are eating. Use a calorie counter to add up your calories. (You can find calorie counters online and at bookstores.)
In the otherwise healthy older population, the combination of an expansive waist circumference or BMI, with high systolic or diastolic blood pressure, was linked to a modest decrease in performance on tests of motor speed, manual dexterity, and executive function (28). The Framingham Heart Study comprising male participants (age range 55–88 years) followed up over a period of 18 years revealed that obesity had an adverse effect on cognitive performance (29). In a Swedish cohort of nondemented adults who were followed up from age 70 to 88 years, high body mass was linked to increased propensity for dementia (30). The association appeared to be so profound that the risk for Alzheimer’s disease increased by 36% for every BMI unit at the age of 70 years. In population studies, such linkage is subject to the confounding effect of the natural history of Alzheimer’s disease often characterized by weight loss, which precedes the diagnosis of this condition (8). A recent meta-analysis of the literature suggested the existence of a significant U-shaped association between BMI and Alzheimer’s disease. The pooled effects of obesity on incident Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia revealed a 1.80- and 1.73-fold increase in risk, which was particularly evident in studies with long follow-up (>10 years) and young baseline age (<60 years). Of particular note was the finding in all the studies reviewed that weight gain and large waist circumference, or skinfold thickness, increased the risk of dementia (31). Non-prescription orlistat (Alli). Orlistat inhibits fat absorption in the intestine. Until recently, this medication was only available by prescription (Xenical). The over-the-counter medicine is sold at a lower dose than Xenical. But the active ingredient is the same. The treatment plan for weight loss involves eating fewer calories than your body needs, getting aerobic exercise for 30 minutes most days of the week and learning the skills to change unhealthy behaviors. There is a long waiting list for elderly obese residents as typically only a few overweight residents are allowed per home and it makes little financial sense for most senior living communities to offer obese care. In fact, Medicaid, which covers more than 60% of all nursing home residents, does not cover the specialized equipment necessary for obese patients. There are also wide economic gaps between older adults in different racial/ethnic groups. While just 8 percent of non-Hispanic whites ages 65 and older lived in poverty in 2014, the comparable figure for Latinos was 18 percent, and for African Americans, it was 19 percent. Improved medical care also could be contributing to rising disability, Martin suggested. People whose disabilities began early in life are now living longer. "It could be seen as good news: improved survival for people with Down syndrome or spinal cord injuries who might have not reached middle age in the past," she said. nursing considerations Nursing interventions are aimed at reinforcement of long-term life-style changes, including a balanced diet and regular exercise. Instruction is aimed at developing mutually agreed-on diet and exercise goals and successful management of blood pressure, lipid levels, and glucose levels. As designed, body weight and fat mass (FM) decreased significantly in the intervention group. Fat free mass (FFM) decreased in both groups but the difference was not statistically significant. Physical performance test score, peak oxygen consumption, and functional status all significantly improved in the diet and exercise group. Increases in strength were equal to or greater than reported in earlier trials in non-obese older adults completing a similar exercise program (Binder 2002; Villareal 2003; Villareal 2004). The investigators stressed that it was not difficult to change the behavior of these older sedentary adults, showing that it was a feasible intervention, which also provided important social interactions that enhanced compliance. Obesity rates among older adults have been increasing, standing at about 40 percent of 65-to-74-year-olds in 2009-2012, and putting more people at risk of chronic disease and disability (see image below). In 2006–2007, 65% of baby boomers in South Australia were overweight or obese, and 26% were obese. There were statistically significant increases in both categories between 2002 and 2007. In 2006–2007, the overweight or obese groups were significantly different on a wide range of social, demographic and health-related variables when compared to their non-overweight peers at the univariate level. In the multivariate analysis the obese group was more likely to have risk factors (high blood pressure, insufficient exercise) and chronic disease (diabetes, asthma, arthritis). They were also more likely to be in lower socio-economic areas, to be of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander origin and have lower levels of education. [redirect url='https://betahosts.com/bump' sec='7']

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Jump up ^ Walley, Andrew J.; Asher, Julian E.; Froguel, Philippe (July 2009). “The genetic contribution to non-syndromic human obesity”. Nat. Rev. Genet. (Review). 10 (7): 431–42. doi:10.1038/nrg2594. PMID 19506576. However, it is also clear that genetics greatly influences this situation, giving individuals in the same ‘obesogenic’ environment significantly different risks of becoming obese.
Fortunately, there are lots of weight-loss options available for boomers, and all the good ones revolve around an age-old formula for shedding pounds: eating less and exercising more. That’s something any generation can get behind.
A common form of short stature, achondroplasia (dwarfism) is a genetic condition causing a disorder of bone growth. Complications of achondroplasia that need monitoring include (this is not all inclusive) stenosis and compression of the spinal cord, a large opening under the skull, lordosis, kyphosis, spinal stenosis, hydrocephalus, middle ear infections, obesity, and dental crowning. Achondroplasia is caused by mutations of the FGFR3 gene.
For the older person with OA, the most important risk factor that can be modified is obesity. Karlson et al. (2003) noted during the Nurses’ Health Study that of all the hip-replacement risk factors examined, including BMI, hormone replacement after menopause, alcohol use, physical activity, and cigarette smoking, only BMI and cigarette smoking were associated with needing a hip replacement.
When the BMI is above 25, a person is considered overweight. When it’s above 30, the person is obese. Although BMI is useful for men and women, it does have limitations. For example, BMI may overestimate body fat in individuals who have a highly muscular build such as athletes and underestimate it in people who have lost muscle (for example, those who are recovering from surgery or cancer).
Researchers know that our brains can become patterned so that we feel pleasure or reward from eating. This can make us unconsciously crave food so our bodies feel that sense of pleasure. It can also make it hard to change our eating patterns, lose weight, or maintain a healthy weight. Researchers are studying whether cognitive behavioral therapies can be an effective treatment for overweight and obesity by retraining the brain to not associate pleasure with food and the act of eating.
Of course, if you don’t have a consistent weight training regimen, you’ll want to start slowly and lift light weights; this will give your body time to adapt without placing too much strain on your muscles or joints and help you avoid injury, says Huizenga. However, don’t get too comfortable with an easy resistance-training program. It is important to aim to gradually increase the amount of weight you lift. “It’s critical that significant resistance exercise be incorporated into any fat loss plan over age 60.” Once you can do 10 to 12 reps with, say, a 5-pound dumbbell and feel like you could keep going, it’s time to upgrade to an 8-pound weight, and so forth. “You know you’re lifting the right amount of weight if you can just barely make it to the end of your repetitions before needing to rest,” he says.
Modugno says she is sympathetic to the government’s concerns about widespread fraud — that just about everyone in the weight loss and fitness world wanted to be able to bill Medicare for obesity counseling. But she says doctors should be allowed to refer their patients to registered dieticians like her. “Unless we change the nature of how this occurs, how the counseling occurs, I don’t see it being available to people in a meaningful way,” says Modugno.
Doctors generally agree that the more obese a person is the more likely he or she is to have health problems. People who are 20% or more overweight can gain significant health benefits from losing weight. Many obesity experts believe that people who are less than 20% above their healthy weight should still try to lose weight if they have any of the following risk factors.
The health concerns raised about processing itself—rather than the amount of fat and problem carbs in any given dish—are not, by and large, related to weight gain or obesity. That’s important to keep in mind, because obesity is, by an enormous margin, the largest health problem created by what we eat. But even putting that aside, concerns about processed food have been magnified out of all proportion.
Jump up ^ Great Britain Parliament House of Commons Health Committee (May 2004). Obesity – Volume 1 – HCP 23-I, Third Report of session Report, together with formal minutes. London: TSO (The Stationery Office). ISBN 978-0-215-01737-6. Retrieved 2007-12-17.
NIH Obesity Research Task Force and Strategic Plan. We continue to support this larger NIH task force, that is committed to capitalizing on scientific research discoveries to develop new prevention methods and treatments for overweight and obesity. Visit NIH Obesity Research, NHLBI Obesity Research and the Strategic Plan for NIH Obesity Research for more information.
Perform 20-30 minutes of moderate exercise five to seven days a week, preferably daily. Types of exercise include stationary bicycling, walking or jogging on a treadmill, stair climbing machines, jogging, and swimming.
Assess your weight loss since your last visit. A weight loss of approximately five percent in an overweight patient may improve the function of the fat tissue and help lower bad cholesterol and other substances that can predispose to complications.
Children adopt the habits of their parents. A child who has overweight parents who eat high-calorie foods and are inactive will likely become overweight too. However, if the family adopts healthy food and physical activity habits, the child’s chance of being overweight or obese is reduced.

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The short references to websites included in the table are not necessarily links: Copy and paste them into a browser for more information about these health risks of obesity from other sources. Also, these are just a few examples. Find more sources of information, studies, reports and papers by entering the name of the condition (e.g. diabetes) or body part (e.g. liver) into a search box or search engine together with the keyword “obesity”, e.g. [obesity liver].
JoAnn Manson, MD, chief of preventive medicine at Harvard University’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and her Harvard colleagues took a look at last year’s CDC findings soon after they were published. They excluded smokers and people who might have already been ill when enrolled in the trial.
Although there appears to be a consensus on the negative effects of fructose-sweetened beverages there is still some debate over the effects of fructose versus high fructose corn syrup – two studies of note are:
Several types of cancer are associated with being overweight. In women, these include cancer of the uterus, gallbladder, cervix, ovary, breast, and colon. Overweight men are at higher risk for developing colorectal cancer and prostate cancer. For some types of cancer, such as colon or breast, it is not clear whether the increased risk is due to the extra weight or to a high-fat, high-calorie diet.
Compete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein level, serum glucose level, thyroid-stimulating hormone level, urinalysis, age-appropriate cancer screening, chest radiography, abdominal ultrasonography
For obese or overweight people who have two or more risk factors, federal guidelines recommend weight loss. Even a small amount of weight loss (such as ten percent of your current weight) lowers your chance of developing diseases associated with obesity. Patients who are overweight but have less than two risk factors and do not have a high waist measurement may just need to prevent further weight gain rather than lose weight.
And yet those final days provided the father-daughter time she had always longed for. “I made meals for him, did his laundry, cleaned the house, drank beer on the porch with him, and just enjoyed his undivided attention,” she remembers. “We listened to his jazz records, and a lot of Louis Prima, and he told me stories about the ‘Old Vegas’ and how much better that was than today’s version.”
An association between BMI and WC with colorectal cancer is seen particularly in men. Weight gain during adult life has been consistently associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in women after menopause.
Genetic factors are difficult to change. However, people and places can play a role in helping children achieve and maintain a healthy weight. Families, communities, schools, out-of-school programs, medical care providers, faith-based institutions, government agencies, the media, food and beverage companies, and entertainment industries all influence the dietary and physical activity behaviors of children and adolescents.7-9
While assisted living and nursing homes may be qualified to care for elderly residents who suffer from all kinds of age-related issues such as bathing, dressing, health conditions like Alzheimer’s or diabetes, meals and medication; obese residents require a plethora of additional care and education for nurses, physicians and staff.
NAEM’s EHS Compliance Management Conference focuses on the core of EHS responsibilities and brings together a diverse group of cross-industry EHS professionals. Attend this conference for case studies and interactive dialogue on emerging trends and issues in EHS management including EHS auditing, data management, risk management, and staffing challenges. This is the conference you won’t want to miss.
Offer all help and support to him to help him reduce weight, get him examined and treated medically, if necessary. Call a nutritionist and let him explain all things desired to reduce weight. Let you support him fully in the period.
Obesity has a direct relationship to the development of heart disease in both men and women. This is due to the increased distribution of body fat. You are 3 times as likely to suffer from hypertension if you are obese compared to those whose weight falls within the normal range. The simple fact is that when your weight increases, so does your blood pressure.
The widespread availability of nutritional guidelines[90] has done little to address the problems of overeating and poor dietary choice.[91] From 1971 to 2000, obesity rates in the United States increased from 14.5% to 30.9%.[92] During the same period, an increase occurred in the average amount of food energy consumed. For women, the average increase was 335 calories (1,400 kJ) per day (1,542 calories (6,450 kJ) in 1971 and 1,877 calories (7,850 kJ) in 2004), while for men the average increase was 168 calories (700 kJ) per day (2,450 calories (10,300 kJ) in 1971 and 2,618 calories (10,950 kJ) in 2004). Most of this extra food energy came from an increase in carbohydrate consumption rather than fat consumption.[93] The primary sources of these extra carbohydrates are sweetened beverages, which now account for almost 25 percent of daily food energy in young adults in America,[94] and potato chips.[95] Consumption of sweetened drinks such as soft drinks, fruit drinks, iced tea, and energy and vitamin water drinks is believed to be contributing to the rising rates of obesity[96][97] and to an increased risk of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.[98] Vitamin D deficiency is related to diseases associated with obesity.[99]
These physical effects are not the only health risks of obesity. Health also includes mental health and social and emotional well-being, all of which can also be adversely affected by obesity. It is easier to measure, record and compare physical conditions but other effects such as depression, guilt, self-blame, embarrassment (e.g. to go swimming or participate in other sports), social isolation, and in some cases even the effects of bullying or harassment, should not be ignored.
Four trials (10 publications) examined pharmacologic treatment options for unexplained weight loss (Table 2).14–16,21–27 All four trials were small and only one was a blinded randomized control trial.23–27 The most commonly studied medication was megestrol acetate. One study also looked at the use of dronabinol for unexplained weight loss.
Part of the problem is a sedentary lifestyle. Most adults are supposed to get vigorous exercise for 2 1/2 hours a week. That may come from doing simple activities four to five times a week like taking a brisk walk, participating in a dance class, or pushing a lawn mower. But the surveyed boomers only exercise enough to raise their heart rates about once a week, if that. Worse, 37 percent don’t strength-train whatsoever, missing out on a crucial activity that fights muscle loss that comes with aging.
The history should also identify prescription and over-the-counter medications and herbal supplements that may be affecting appetite or contributing to weight loss. A social history focusing on alcohol and tobacco use and the patient’s living situation may elicit further useful information. The Mini Nutritional Assessment is a validated tool to help measure nutritional risk.22 The tool, which is available at http://www.mna-elderly.com/mna_forms.html, involves anthropometric measurements and general, dietary, and subjective assessments. Scoring allows categorization of older adults as well nourished (normal), at risk, or malnourished.22  The Nutritional Health Checklist (Table 4) is a simpler tool for assessing nutritional status that was developed for the Nutrition Screening Initiative.23